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NEWS
October 29, 2005
CHRIS DUPONT passed away on October 26, 2005 after an accident on October 4, 2005. He was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland for 26 years. Chris was born in Corpus Christi, TX on June 21, 1951 to Leland (deceased) and Dolores Dupont. Chris was a Senior Inspector for KCI Technology, Inc., in Baltimore, Maryland for 15 years. Chris is survived by his loving wife, Cynthia Dupont of Baltimore, Maryland; his mother Dolores Dupont of Orange Grove, TX; one brother, Leland Dupont II of Muldoon, TX; and best buddies Abby and Scuby.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
TIC Gums in Harford County is perhaps the biggest privately owned player in an invisible part of the food industry. It's not chewing gum, though the company does get some visitors who assume that's what it makes. The name refers to a different kind of gum - the type known as hydrocolloids, which hold the ingredients in your ranch dressing together and influence the way food feels in your mouth. The natural additives give many products their texture and consistency. "Just about anything you buy in the grocery store needs some level of it," said Greg Andon, the company's president.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 24, 2008
Elizabeth "Betty" DuPont, a volunteer and former Lutherville resident, died of aortic stenosis Sunday at a nursing home in South Portland, Maine. She was 89. Elizabeth Lunt was born and raised in South Portland. After graduating from high school in 1936, she attended Northeastern Business College. After moving to Lutherville in 1959, Mrs. DuPont became an active member of Havenwood Presbyterian Church and was a former board member of the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. Mrs. DuPont was an enthusiastic cook and enjoyed entertaining family and friends.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Spring brings renewal, and that was the feeling among some horsemen Wednesday, when the Maryland Jockey Club released a Pimlico spring stakes schedule that includes the return of the Grade III Allaire duPont Distaff on Preakness Day and a $100,000 boost to the purse for the day before's Grade II Black-Eyed Susan Stakes. The MJC unveiled the stakes schedule after reaching agreement with the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association and Maryland Horse Breeders Association. All that remains is for the Maryland Racing Commission to approve it Feb. 15 at its monthly meeting at Laurel Park.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Widely known as a sportswoman and equestrian, Allaire C. duPont loved animals, including her noted thoroughbred Kelso - a winner of the 1964 Washington D.C. International at Laurel Race Course. But Mrs. duPont also was a major advocate for Cecil County land conservation and led historic preservation in Chesapeake City, which she helped transform into a restored canal town over the past two decades. She died Friday at age 92. Family members said Mrs. duPont suffered a mini-stroke late last year and succumbed at her Woodstock Farm in Chesapeake City, where many of the animals she owned and loved are buried.
BUSINESS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | December 12, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Facing sharp competition and market share erosion in its once-unassailable corn seed business, DuPont Co. says it will cut about 10 percent of its work force, or 1,500 employees, in its agriculture and nutrition division. The cuts will save the Wilmington, Del., chemical company about $100 million a year, which it will plow back into developing new high-yielding corn seeds. DuPont's Pioneer Hi-Bred seed operation, a centerpiece of its effort to restructure into a biotech company and out of old-line petrochemicals, has been losing corn seed market share to Monsanto Corp.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Laura DuPont, an international tennis champion and former manager of the Orchard Indoor Tennis Club, died Wednesday at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., of cancer. She was 52. Ms. DuPont, who lived in Lutherville from about 1980 to 1997, was once the ninth-ranked women's tennis player in the world. She was the U.S. clay court women's singles champion in 1977 and winner of the German Open in 1976, the Argentine Open in 1977 and the Canadian Open in 1979. On the tennis court "she was unflappable," said retired tennis star Pam Shriver, a Baltimore native who was DuPont's doubles partner on the professional tour.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
A military funeral for Howard D. Dupont, a decorated Army veteran and retired employee of the Heritage Automobile Group, was conducted Tuesday at Arlington National Cemetery.Mr. Dupont, who was 63 and a resident of Tivoly Avenue, died of cancer Aug. 30 at the Francis Scott Key Medical Center.Born and reared in Harahan, La., Mr. Dupont moved to Baltimore with his family after his parents gave up dairy farming. He enlisted in the Army in 1948, beginning a military career that spanned two decades.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | December 9, 1992
DuPont Agricultural Products has decided to pump $2 million into Crop Genetics International Corp. to help the company commercialize several products to protect garden vegetables and orchards from insects, the companies said yesterday.A year ago, the two companies formed an alliance to begin producing insecticidal viruses, and Crop Genetics, a Hanover-based biotech company, began renovating a 75,500-square-foot manufacturing facility in Columbia.The company hopes the Environmental Protection Agency gives its approval soon to begin marketing the products and that manufacturing will begin by September 1993,said Joseph Kelly, Crop Genetics' chief executive.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Wilmington, Del. - The rich are different from the rest of us. They have better gardens. But if we are lucky, they let us visit those gardens, drinking in the serenity, marveling at the perfection. That is certainly the case with Nemours, the mansion and gardens created at the turn of the 20th century by Alfred I. duPont, the great-great-grandson of Pierre Samuel duPont, the French aristocrat who immigrated to this country and founded a family fortune by making gunpowder. Nemours, both the 47,000-square-foot mansion and the 220 acres of gardens, has just undergone a $39 million face-lift overseen by Sandra Parson Vicchio of the Baltimore architectural firm Ayers Saint Gross, which also designed the award-winning visitors center.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
Route 50 was closed at Interstate 97 in Anne Arundel County for three to four hours Sunday evening while hazmat crews cleaned up a spill from a leaking tanker-truck, an Anne Arundel County fire spokesman said. A truck driver from New Jersey noticed a vapor cloud coming from his vehicle and called for help at about 5:04 p.m., said the spokesman, Capt. James Rostek. Medics treated the 50-year-old driver for inhalation and took him to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for potential hyperbaric therapy, Rostek said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The National Audubon Society has sold a 950-acre wildlife sanctuary it was given on the Eastern Shore to former Anne Arundel County executive Robert A. Pascal, who said Friday he plans to raise organic cattle and hay on part of it. Pascal and Audubon both declined to disclose the purchase price, though state assessment records valued the land and six homes there at $8.5 million. The waterfront estate near Bozman in Talbot County was once a hunting preserve for the DuPont family. It was donated to Audubon 13 years ago by Jean Ellen duPont Shehan to be a nature preserve and outdoor education center.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | March 17, 2010
The unveiling of the spring schedule at a meeting of the Maryland Racing Commission on Tuesday came with good news and bad, as the state's horse racing industry continues to struggle for financial stability. More than $2.4 million will be up for grabs in 18 stakes races during the spring meet at Pimlico Race Course, but the Grade I Pimlico Special, which dates to War Admiral's 1937 victory and for years has been the second-most important race in Maryland after the Grade I Preakness, will not be among the scheduled events.
NEWS
By Ashley Halsey III and Ashley Halsey III,The Washington Post | February 6, 2010
After hearing hype that rivaled the Super Bowl, after sweeping the supermarkets clean and stockpiling enough food for a winter's hibernation, the Washington region braced Friday for a storm that was expected to leave at least 20 inches of snow on the ground by late Saturday. The District of Columbia declared a snow emergency, ticketing cars parked on emergency routes and changing traffic signals to handle an early evening rush hour. The school systems that bothered to open at all - in the District and the Maryland counties of Howard, Montgomery, Prince George's and Anne Arundel - sent everyone home early.
NEWS
April 23, 2009
On April 20, 2009, MARIE WILLIAMS. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after 8:30 A.M. The family will receive friends on Saturday at 10:30 A.M. at St. John Baptist Church, 2929 Dupont Avenue. Funeral services will follow at 11:00 A.M.
NEWS
March 8, 2009
Suddenly, on March 1, 2009 , John A. Darden Sr. A Memorial Service will be held on Thursday March 12, 2009 at 11:00A.M. at Dupont Park SDA Church, 3985 Massachusetts Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20019
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | March 1, 1996
WILMINGTON, Del. -- DuPont Co. said yesterday that it will slash 1,500 jobs in its fiber businesses to make them more competitive, and said it took a first-quarter charge of $27 million.The action affects about 1,200 employees at the company's North American nylon and Dacron polyester divisions, and another 300 people who work under contract. Of the 1,200 DuPont workers, 800 will be fired and 400 transferred to other jobs, the company said.Rising competition has forced the world's largest nylon maker to cut costs in an effort to maintain its leading position.
BUSINESS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | August 4, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- DuPont Co., which has gone through extensive restructuring over the past decade, has told Wall Street analysts that 40 percent of its businesses are failing to reach corporate profitability targets and some face restructuring or sale. Another round of disruptive asset sales is unlikely, but some businesses will be unloaded, David Peet, director of investor relations, said in an interview. "There will have to be divestitures," he said. DuPont also plans to cut costs or rework business plans to boost profitability in low-return units, Peet said.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2008
Nov. 26: Name of product: Century Cookware Stainless Steel Stockpots Units: About 7,000 Importer: Ocean State Jobbers Inc., of North Kingstown, R.I. Hazard: The stainless steel pots have metal handles that can detach during use. Sold at: All Ocean State Job Lot stores throughout New England from July 2008 through October 2008 for between $12 and $25. Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the stockpots and return them to the place of...
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