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By Margy Rochlin and Margy Rochlin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2004
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Kirsten Dunst tells a story about the strangeness of fame. She was 12 and had landed what would be her breakthrough role as an aging woman in a child's body in Interview With the Vampire. At the time, she lived with her family near the Warner Brothers lot that is famous as a way station for stage parents and their child-star offspring and as a hotbed of competition. One day, Dunst recalled, a young girl approached her and bragged, "My agent says I'm going to be the next Kirsten Dunst."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
If a high-end patisserie ever went "all you can eat," the result would be something like Marie Antoinette, an endless gourmet pastry tray of a movie put together by a gifted young bakery chef, writer-director Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation). It's high-caloric art-house moviemaking, full of pastry-coated, sugar-swirled ideas and historical moments dipped in candy. They are consumed entirely in the watching of the movie. They leave no aftertaste - no troubling thought, no haunting emotion, except, perhaps, a smile and a tear for Kirsten Dunst's cheerful valor in the title role.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2004
SUN SCORE **** Spider-Man 2 is a comic-book film with the soul and tang of a funny-sad first-love story. The dazzling visuals and special-effects cohere into a stirring and sometimes hilarious romantic adventure that pits two bereft males against each other and dots the screen with wounded hearts. Spider-Man, aka Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire), decides he can never consummate his passion for Mary Jane Watson (Kirsten Dunst) because he endangers everyone who gets close to him. Dr. Otto Octavius (Alfred Molina)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2005
Dreamer What It's About: A girl, her dad and a racehorse bond in ways guaranteed to warm every heart. Rated: PG The scoop: Stars Dakota Fanning and Kurt Russell are wonderful, even though the film is too precious by half. Grade: C+ Elizabethtown What It's About: A suicidal shoe designer (Orlando Bloom) returns to his father's old Kentucky home with his father's ashes; a cockeyed optimist of a flight attendant (Kirsten Dunst) cheers him up. Rated: PG-13 The scoop: Cameron Crowe's heartfelt tribute to his father has too much going on for its own good.
NEWS
September 3, 2005
On September 1, 2005, SHELVIAJEAN MAE WARREN loving wife of Bill E. Warren, mother of Portia Dunst and husband Herman, Donald Warren and Tim Warren, sister of Jearlene Mc Donald and Juanita Papa, grandmother of Eric Dunst, Brad Dunst, Justin Warren and Melissa Warren. Also survived by great-grandchild Madylin Elise Dunst. Family will receive friends at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14) on Sunday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P. M where services will be held on Tuesday at 11 A.M. Interment Lake View Memorial Park.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2000
They're cuter than you, more popular than you, and better than you. The cheerleaders from Rancho Carne High School impart that message in an opening number promising lots of sass in "Bring It On." But the movie delivers only on occasion as it skewers and celebrates competitive cheerleading. The energy crackles in the cheerleading scenes, and then goes as limp as wet pom-poms when the story relies on teen-movie cliches. Kirsten Dunst is Polyanna in a pleated skirt. Dunst, a portrait of nubile reserve in "The Virgin Suicides," turns downright spunky in "Bring It On."
NEWS
April 12, 1995
A lunch-time card game at the Howard County Detention Center in Jessup got out of hand Monday, resulting in a fight in which an inmate struck another prisoner with a crutch, jail officials said.Donald Myrick, 32, being held at the jail for failure to appear in court, was driven by ambulance to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center after the 11:30 a.m. fight. He was treated for head injuries and released about 5 p.m. Monday, Howard County rescue officials said.The other inmate -- a man jailed at the center for assault whose name was not released by prison officials -- was uninjured.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 6, 1993
On a cool October morning 20 years ago, my college roommate, Dunst, awoke early and decided he was through eating meat.This startling decision was made known to everyone at lunch that day in the cafeteria.As I pressed a 2-story-high hamburger topped with pickles, lettuce, tomato and onions into my mouth, Dunst whispered: "Murderer!""Beg pardon?" I managed to choke."Steer-killer!" he said.Then he turned his attention to my man Witte, who was inhaling a cheese steak sandwich."You make me sick!"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
If a high-end patisserie ever went "all you can eat," the result would be something like Marie Antoinette, an endless gourmet pastry tray of a movie put together by a gifted young bakery chef, writer-director Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation). It's high-caloric art-house moviemaking, full of pastry-coated, sugar-swirled ideas and historical moments dipped in candy. They are consumed entirely in the watching of the movie. They leave no aftertaste - no troubling thought, no haunting emotion, except, perhaps, a smile and a tear for Kirsten Dunst's cheerful valor in the title role.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 17, 2004
They meet cute, play tennis cute and certainly look cute. Trouble is, that's as involving as this movie gets. Wimbledon is an attempt to play out Bull Durham on grass, to do for tennis what that great 1988 film did for baseball: make it seem hip, dramatic and, most of all, sexy. But it has nowhere near the edge of the earlier film, which was as smart as it was erotic; sadly, Wimbledon is neither. Paul Bettany is Peter Colt, a 32-year-old has-been on the pro tennis scene about to play in what he resignedly decides will be his final tournament.
NEWS
September 3, 2005
On September 1, 2005, SHELVIAJEAN MAE WARREN loving wife of Bill E. Warren, mother of Portia Dunst and husband Herman, Donald Warren and Tim Warren, sister of Jearlene Mc Donald and Juanita Papa, grandmother of Eric Dunst, Brad Dunst, Justin Warren and Melissa Warren. Also survived by great-grandchild Madylin Elise Dunst. Family will receive friends at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14) on Sunday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P. M where services will be held on Tuesday at 11 A.M. Interment Lake View Memorial Park.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 17, 2004
They meet cute, play tennis cute and certainly look cute. Trouble is, that's as involving as this movie gets. Wimbledon is an attempt to play out Bull Durham on grass, to do for tennis what that great 1988 film did for baseball: make it seem hip, dramatic and, most of all, sexy. But it has nowhere near the edge of the earlier film, which was as smart as it was erotic; sadly, Wimbledon is neither. Paul Bettany is Peter Colt, a 32-year-old has-been on the pro tennis scene about to play in what he resignedly decides will be his final tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Margy Rochlin and Margy Rochlin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2004
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Kirsten Dunst tells a story about the strangeness of fame. She was 12 and had landed what would be her breakthrough role as an aging woman in a child's body in Interview With the Vampire. At the time, she lived with her family near the Warner Brothers lot that is famous as a way station for stage parents and their child-star offspring and as a hotbed of competition. One day, Dunst recalled, a young girl approached her and bragged, "My agent says I'm going to be the next Kirsten Dunst."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2004
SUN SCORE **** Spider-Man 2 is a comic-book film with the soul and tang of a funny-sad first-love story. The dazzling visuals and special-effects cohere into a stirring and sometimes hilarious romantic adventure that pits two bereft males against each other and dots the screen with wounded hearts. Spider-Man, aka Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire), decides he can never consummate his passion for Mary Jane Watson (Kirsten Dunst) because he endangers everyone who gets close to him. Dr. Otto Octavius (Alfred Molina)
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | January 4, 2004
Now and then, the words nifty or groovy may drop into a conversation, instantly identifying the speaker as an old fogy or, worse, an old hippie. But the word cool doesn't do that. Cool is constant. As a modifier, as the modified, as a noun and as a verb, cool has withstood the fleeting nature of most slang. What is the reason for cool's longevity? That's an easy question for Keith Covington, owner of the New Haven Lounge in North Baltimore and jazz expert. As long as Miles Davis' classic 1949 work, Birth of the Cool, remains the best-selling jazz album of all time, cool will stay cool, he says.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 17, 2002
In The Cat's Meow, Edward Herrmann's William Randolph Hearst tries to play the fun-loving host of a yacht party for the likes of Charlie Chaplin (Eddie Izzard). But from the start he moves with the stricken and bewildered heaviness of a wounded elephant. Herrmann and his director, Peter Bogdanovich, and his screenwriter, Steven Peros, have transformed the tale of Hearst's most disastrous pleasure cruise into a masochistic, histrionic showcase on the order of The Blue Angel. Hermann's Hearst is an emotionally needy monarch in a jester's hat who turns menacing when he learns that his beloved mistress Marion Davies (Kirsten Dunst)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 17, 2002
In The Cat's Meow, Edward Herrmann's William Randolph Hearst tries to play the fun-loving host of a yacht party for the likes of Charlie Chaplin (Eddie Izzard). But from the start he moves with the stricken and bewildered heaviness of a wounded elephant. Herrmann and his director, Peter Bogdanovich, and his screenwriter, Steven Peros, have transformed the tale of Hearst's most disastrous pleasure cruise into a masochistic, histrionic showcase on the order of The Blue Angel. Hermann's Hearst is an emotionally needy monarch in a jester's hat who turns menacing when he learns that his beloved mistress Marion Davies (Kirsten Dunst)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2001
It's a staple as old as the love story itself: A guy is crazy for a girl who no longer desires him, and he's so busy feeling sorry for himself that he doesn't notice the even better girl who'd take him in a second. That's the essential plot of "Get Over It," a surprisingly funny and good-hearted teen comedy that Miramax tried to sneak into theaters this week without any grumpy old critics getting a look at it. Usually, that's a sure sign the film's in trouble. But not here: "Get Over It" is a delightful and exuberant bit of romantic comedy and, as a bonus, it breathes new life into a pair of '70s musical chestnuts long off our culture's radar screens.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2001
It's a staple as old as the love story itself: A guy is crazy for a girl who no longer desires him, and he's so busy feeling sorry for himself that he doesn't notice the even better girl who'd take him in a second. That's the essential plot of "Get Over It," a surprisingly funny and good-hearted teen comedy that Miramax tried to sneak into theaters this week without any grumpy old critics getting a look at it. Usually, that's a sure sign the film's in trouble. But not here: "Get Over It" is a delightful and exuberant bit of romantic comedy and, as a bonus, it breathes new life into a pair of '70s musical chestnuts long off our culture's radar screens.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2000
They're cuter than you, more popular than you, and better than you. The cheerleaders from Rancho Carne High School impart that message in an opening number promising lots of sass in "Bring It On." But the movie delivers only on occasion as it skewers and celebrates competitive cheerleading. The energy crackles in the cheerleading scenes, and then goes as limp as wet pom-poms when the story relies on teen-movie cliches. Kirsten Dunst is Polyanna in a pleated skirt. Dunst, a portrait of nubile reserve in "The Virgin Suicides," turns downright spunky in "Bring It On."
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