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NEWS
April 9, 2006
JEAN DUNLOP CARMICHAEL, 92, minister's wife Jean Dunlop Carmichael, wife of the late Rev. Ralph M. Carmichael, of Albany and Raquette Lake, NY. and Ajijic, Lake Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico, died peacefully on Thursday, March 23, 2006. She was a 1935 graduate of Mc Gill University. A Memorial Service will be offered on Saturday, May 13 at 1:00 P.M. at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Main and Madison Avenues, Albany, NY. Burial will be in Scarborough, Ontario. Obituary: www.sthubertsisle.com/page206.
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SPORTS
By Compiled from news service and Web reports | September 29, 2008
Mr. Flip always has felt a special affinity with Paul Newman. It could be because of his tremendous body of work or his appealing persona. But it's really because Mr. Flip often has been mistaken for him. (When the paper bag is off, of course.) Newman, who died Friday at 83, made what surely is one of the funniest sports-related movies ever, Slap Shot, and he also starred in other films with sports themes - Somebody Up There Likes Me (boxing), The Hustler and The Color of Money (pool) and Winning (auto racing)
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NEWS
January 14, 2004
On Monday, January 12, 2004, JOHN A. DUNLOP, age 95 (retired College Administrator); beloved husband of the late Wilna (nee Snyder) Dunlop; devoted father of Marion E. Malcolm; grandfather of John A. Malcolm and his wife Jill, and Elizabeth N. Malcolm, of Scottsdale, AZ; great-grandfather of Peter and Victoria Malcolm; dear uncle of W. David Borden and Mary Miller. A Memorial Service will be held at the family owned Peaceful Alternatives Funeral and Cremation Center, 2325 York Road, Timonium, on Saturday, January 24, at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in John's name to the Hospice of Baltimore, 6601 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD, 21204.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 20, 2008
Mary K. Sim, an accomplished cook who proved a Julia Child recipe didn't work and received an acknowledgment from the TV chef, died of heart failure Feb. 12 at her home in Columbia. She was 92. Mary Kinnard was born and raised in Cashmere, Wash. After graduating from high school in 1932, she was a pre-med student at the University of Minnesota. In 1934, she married John Bonhus, a Minneapolis hardware dealer, and was a homemaker there for 36 years. Their marriage ended in divorce. In 1970, she married a former high school classmate, Dr. Van Murray Sim, and moved to Bel Air. Dr. Sim, who was chief of medical research at Edgewood Arsenal, died in 1995.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
Teachers and school administrators are poised to receive a 3 percent raise next year, after the signing of a tentative agreement between the Howard County Education Association and the school system.Howard's state rank in terms of teacher salaries won't be known until other counties have finished their negotiations. However, school officials hope the increase announced yesterday will help correct what has been deemed a gradual loss of salary competitiveness."That was definitely one of our motivating factors in setting the parameters as high as we did," said Karen B. Campbell, school board chairwoman.
NEWS
November 26, 1994
Helena C. NewcombHospital workerHelena Cook Newcomb, a retired hospital worker, died Monday of a liver illness at the Bay Meadow Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center in Glen Burnie. She was 79.The Pasadena native, who attended Anne Arundel County schools, retired in 1986 after 20 years at Maryland General Hospital.Services were to be held at 10 a.m. today at the Stallings Funeral Home, 3111 Mountain Road, Pasadena.She is survived by her husband, Leroy Newcomb, whom she married in 1941; two daughters, Ellen Heath and Christine Merritt, both of Pasadena; and five grandchildren.
NEWS
August 26, 1996
Graham Warren Dunlop, 83, AARP conferences directorGraham Warren Dunlop, a former director of conferences and conventions for the American Association of Retired Persons and a docent at the National Cathedral in Washington, died Tuesday from complications of liver disease at Meridian Healthcare Center in Spa Creek. He was 83 and lived in Annapolis.Mr. Dunlop spent most of his working career in the hospitality and travel industries.After serving as an infantry officer in World War II, he joined Eastern Airlines as a passenger agent in Boston, where he later became manager of conferences and travel for Prudential Insurance Co.In 1974, he joined AARP and retired in 1986.
SPORTS
By The Boston Globe | October 3, 1993
CARDIFF, Wales -- Apparently International Boxing Federation and World Boxing Association heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe is facing a weighty problem as he prepares for his Nov. 6 rematch with former champion Evander Holyfield.One has to consider the source on such matters as a heavyweight's expansive waistline, but here is what former Sugar Ray Leonard associate Ollie Dunlop said last week concerning Bowe's physique."Bowe looked like a rhino before he left for his training camp," said Dunlop, who lives near Bowe outside Washington.
NEWS
By Newsday | March 25, 1993
Former Secretary of Labor John T. Dunlop has been named t head a commission whose goal will be to develop a new national policy for the treatment of American workers.The 10-member Commission on the Future of Worker/Management Relations is to re-examine the 60-year-old National Labor Relations Act. Enacted in an era of labor-management warfare and a worldwide depression, the act was designed to bring peace to the American workplace and to assure the right of workers to join a union.The Dunlop commission is undertaking its mission in a more complex setting of economic recession, coupled with confusion about the future for American workers in a time of intense international competition for markets and good jobs.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1994
IBM sets new version of OS/2IBM, hoping to revive its desktop software business and exploit a delayed product introduction by the Microsoft Corp., is about to introduce a more powerful, consumer-friendlier version of the OS/2 software operating system for personal computers.The critically acclaimed improvements to OS/2, some of which IBM disclosed yesterday, include built-in, easy access to the Internet, the global web of computer networks. Executives of the IBM Personal Software Products division here said the new version of OS/2, code-named Warp, is expected to be formally introduced next month.
NEWS
April 9, 2006
JEAN DUNLOP CARMICHAEL, 92, minister's wife Jean Dunlop Carmichael, wife of the late Rev. Ralph M. Carmichael, of Albany and Raquette Lake, NY. and Ajijic, Lake Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico, died peacefully on Thursday, March 23, 2006. She was a 1935 graduate of Mc Gill University. A Memorial Service will be offered on Saturday, May 13 at 1:00 P.M. at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Main and Madison Avenues, Albany, NY. Burial will be in Scarborough, Ontario. Obituary: www.sthubertsisle.com/page206.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
It began as an observation that inflamed academicians worldwide. It's morphed into a test case for experts in corporate damage control. Whether or not Harvard University president Lawrence Summers actually believes men are innately superior to women in math and the sciences, when he broached that politically incorrect possibility in a closed-door meeting last month, he sparked a controversy that triggered a near revolt on his faculty and left his job...
NEWS
January 21, 2004
On Monday, January 12, 2004, JOHN A. DUNLOP, age 95 (retired College Administrator); beloved husband of the late Wilna (nee Snyder) Dunlop; devoted father of Marion E. Malcolm; grandfather of John A. Malcolm and his wife Jill, and Elizabeth N. Malcolm, of Scottsdale, AZ; great-grandfather of Peter and Victoria Malcolm; dear uncle of W. David Borden and Mary Miller. A Memorial Service will be held at the family owned Peaceful Alternatives Funeral and Cremation Center, 2325 York Road, Timonium, on Saturday, January 24, at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in John's name to the Hospice of Baltimore, 6601 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD, 21204.
NEWS
October 5, 2003
William Steig, 95, a prolific illustrator for The New Yorker known as the "King of Cartoons" for his award-winning, best-selling children's books including Shrek, died of natural causes of Friday at his home in Boston. Mr. Steig combined a child's innocent eye with idiosyncratic line to create a wonderful world of animal characters for his books and Edwardian-era dandies in his drawings. His 1990 book about a green monster, Shrek, was made into the hit film that in 2002 became the first winner of an Oscar in the new category of best animated feature.
NEWS
November 26, 2002
A $1 million gift from Drew Bauer, part-owner of the St. Louis Cardinals, will be used to establish a professorship in transplant surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Bauer, who received a kidney transplant at the medical center three years ago, said at a gift-giving ceremony yesterday that he wanted the professorship to advance research and encourage organ donations. The teaching position is being named for his sister, Barbara Bauer Dunlop, who donated a kidney to him. "I can't think of a better way to honor my sister, who saved my life through her brave and unselfish act," said Bauer, whose transplant was performed by a team led by Dr. Stephen T. Bartlett.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 25, 2001
Groundbreaking ceremonies always test the creativity of developers and academic institutions, among others, as they seek fitting ways to mark the construction of important buildings without resorting to the predictable lineup of dignitaries sticking shovels in the earth. A local developer once let a flock of homing pigeons fly from the upper windows of an old building he was renovating to show it would no longer be a pigeon coop. The Peabody Institute recently held a musical groundbreaking, with musicians in hard hats, to signal that it had started its $24 million expansion in Mount Vernon.
NEWS
November 26, 2002
A $1 million gift from Drew Bauer, part-owner of the St. Louis Cardinals, will be used to establish a professorship in transplant surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Bauer, who received a kidney transplant at the medical center three years ago, said at a gift-giving ceremony yesterday that he wanted the professorship to advance research and encourage organ donations. The teaching position is being named for his sister, Barbara Bauer Dunlop, who donated a kidney to him. "I can't think of a better way to honor my sister, who saved my life through her brave and unselfish act," said Bauer, whose transplant was performed by a team led by Dr. Stephen T. Bartlett.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH BACH and DEBORAH BACH,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 16, 2000
The dream was always the same. She'd be skating on a pond, gliding gracefully in the moonlight, when she'd suddenly lift off and start flying. As she grew up, the dream got shelved in that place dreams go but never quite die, just sit waiting to be dusted off when the time is right. That time came decades later for Jean Hinlicky, when her 7-year-old son began taking figure-skating lessons. She watched from the sidelines for about six months, then couldn't stand it anymore. She had to be out there too. At 43, Hinlicky started taking classes with her son. After a few years, her son decided it was a girlie sport.
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