Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDungy
IN THE NEWS

Dungy

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | February 1, 2007
MIAMI-- --It's the quintessential dopey Super Bowl week question: If you were a tree, what kind of tree would you be? This year, there's a legit answer, at least if you ask the two coaches, the Indianapolis Colts' Tony Dungy and the Chicago Bears' Lovie Smith: a coaching tree. Well, Dungy has a tree. Smith is one of its products. This tree is unique in a couple of ways - it's one of the more recently planted, since Dungy has been an NFL head coach for only 11 years, and its branches include primarily, although not solely, African-American coaches.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 31, 2012
The coaching fraternity can be a tight one, especially among those on the NFL level. But that didn't prevent former Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy from lobbing a volley at Ravens coach John Harbaugh. Dungy, now an analyst on NBC's “Football Night in America,” questioned Harbaugh's decision to pull many of his starters early in Sunday's eventual 23-17 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals. Had the Ravens (10-6) won, they might have had a chance to vault from the No. 4 seed to the No. 3 spot and tangle with Cincinnati (10-6)
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | February 3, 2007
MIAMI -- Once again, the Indianapolis Colts' Tony Dungy and Chicago Bears' Lovie Smith made Super Bowl history. Only 57 hours before kickoff, the first two black head coaches in the Super Bowl - and two close friends - met briefly at yesterday's news conference, which is an unusual occurrence for the event. It is believed to be the first time coaches have posed with the championship trophy before the game. When the photo session ended, they shook hands and hugged. "That was an awesome moment," Dungy said, "not only because of what that symbolized for African-American people and African-American coaches, but more than that because of who I was standing with.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 3, 2012
After weeks of questioning the Ravens' credentials as a Super Bowl contender, former Indianapolis Colts coach and current NBC analyst Tony Dungy positioned himself for a seat on the Ravens bandwagon. Appearing on the network's “Football Night in America” program Sunday night, Dungy was asked to provide his thoughts on the best team in the AFC, and his answer involved the top-seeded New England Patriots - but for not the reason one might expect. “Their defense scares me,” Dungy said of the Patriots.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 15, 2008
It has become an annual ritual for Tony Dungy to contemplate retirement as the Indianapolis Colts' coach once the team's season ends. While the mere mention of the name Irsay raises predictable ire in Baltimore, the lengths to which owner Jim Irsay is willing to go to keep Dungy and yet allow the coach to spend more time away from the team and with his family are admirable. Dungy's soul-searching is understandable.
SPORTS
By DAVID WHITLEY and DAVID WHITLEY,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 29, 2006
Tony Dungy is back at work now. He looks like the same person he's always been. Then he'll get a flash. "Something happens," Dungy said. "Some trigger will go off." He'll have to stop. Losing a son to suicide brings pain and questions that will never go away. "You'll always have those moments," Dungy said. He got the news two days before Christmas. A few weeks later, his Indianapolis Colts endured a devastating end to what had been a dream season. There is no comparing the two, of course.
SPORTS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
Wearing a crestfallen look as he trudged off the practice field, Ravens coach Brian Billick offered up his condolences to friend and former colleague Tony Dungy, whose son died near Tampa, Fla., yesterday morning. Billick worked with Dungy, now coach of the Indianapolis Colts, on the Minnesota Vikings staff from 1992-95. Dungy and Billick have remained friends through the years, and Billick said he knew 18-year-old James Dungy. "There is not much I can give you," a shaken Billick said.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 30, 2005
Let's hope Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy experiences a change of heart in the next few weeks as his undefeated team goes about wrapping up a division title and home-field advantage throughout the AFC playoffs. Let's hope he decides to make every effort to have the Colts become the first NFL team to go 16-0, and just the second in the modern era to finish a regular season with a perfect record. Let's hope he doesn't ease up in the last few games if the Colts have nothing left to play for, as he intimated he might late Monday night after the Colts thrashed the Steelers to improve to 11-0.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | February 5, 2007
MIAMI -- Tony Dungy probably didn't even get wet. The first black coach to lead a team to a Super Bowl championship did it in a torrential downpour - that figures - and did it by imitating a stroll in the park on a clear spring day. By doing that, he set the tone for his team to remain just as placid and unruffled when almost any other team would have been at least a little flustered. He's been tormented by playoff near-misses, fired for not being "tough" enough, haunted by a personal loss (the suicide of his son last season)
SPORTS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 28, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - Tony Dungy's search for an offensive coordinator ended at the office down the hall. Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterbacks coach Clyde Christensen was promoted Friday to the position Dungy made vacant Jan. 9 when he fired Les Steckel. Christensen, who turns 43 today, will be the Bucs' third offensive coordinator in as many seasons. Steckel was fired after the Bucs lost in the first round of the playoffs. "There were some good people out there who could have come in from the outside," Dungy said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 28, 2011
With just one game left in the regular season, the Ravens are in position to capture a first-round bye and a home playoff game for the first time since 2006. But the Ravens, who are competing with the New England Patriots and the Pittsburgh Steelers, for one of the top two seeds in the AFC, didn't generate much enthusiasm from the NBC analysts who sit in on the network's “Football Night in America” broadcast.” Asked to rank those three teams, former Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy said, “It kind of changes moment by moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
NBC Sports shared some of the interview that Tony Dungy did with Ravens coach John Harbaugh. It will air tonight during NBC's prime-time coverage. NOTE [from NBC]: John Harbaugh's brother is San Francisco 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh. Their father, Jack, was a longtime college football coach, including as an assistant at Michigan. DUNGY: If I were to describe you and your brother Jim, two words would be intense and competitive. Is that from growing up with a dad as a coach or is that from growing up together?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 5, 2011
The Ravens' 24-10 rout of the Cleveland Browns Sunday earned the team a few accolades from a pair of analysts on NBC's “Football Night in America” program. Former Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy was effusive in his praise of the offense's strategy of giving the ball to running back Ray Rice, who rushed for a career-best 204 yards and one touchdown. “You think of the Baltimore Ravens and all their defensive stars, we think of [defensive tackle Haloti] Ngata and [inside linebacker]
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 21, 2011
With a 7-3 record after Sunday's 31-24 win against the Cincinnati Bengals, the Ravens have legitimately thrown their hats into the circle in contention to be crowned the best team in the AFC. The Ravens have the same record as the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Houston Texans, but have beaten both of those teams, including the Steelers twice. The Ravens are one game better than the 6-3 New England Patriots in the win column. On NBC's “Football Night in America” program Sunday night, former Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy and former New England Patriots safety Rodney Harrison debated the merits of the Ravens' candidacy for that title.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 3, 2011
Analysts for NBC, which will broadcast Sunday night's clash between the Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers from Heinz Field, don't sound very optimistic about the Ravens' chances of beating the Steelers for the second time this season. In comments distributed by the network, former Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy pointed out that the Ravens haven't really replicated the rushing production that helped them enjoy a 35-7 rout of Pittsburgh in the season opener on Sept. 11. “John Harbaugh has to be concerned,” Dungy said of the Ravens coach.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 29, 2011
The Ravens and New York Jets will meet Sunday night at M&T Bank Stadium, an affair that will be nationally televised on NBC. As with all Sunday night broadcasts, NBC emailed a couple thoughts from Sunday Night Football analysts Tony Dungy and Rodney Harrison. Dungy, the Super Bowl-winning coach with the Indianapolis Colts, opined that with identical 2-1 records, both teams will be primed for this showdown. “The Ravens had an emotional letdown going to Tennessee [on Sept.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 23, 2008
It's probably fitting that an introspective and candid figure like Tony Dungy elicits similar reaction from the people who try to write about him. In sports, we usually deal with the obvious by accentuating it with whatever flourish we can muster, whether it's the impressive excellence of the New England Patriots and Tom Brady or the delightful surprise of the New York Giants and Eli Manning. However, Dungy is a constant reminder of a greater purpose in life beyond the sidelines or off the court.
SPORTS
By CHRIS HARRY and CHRIS HARRY,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 28, 2005
Lutz, Fla. -- As the Indianapolis Colts marched to their magical run of 13 straight victories to open the 2005 NFL season, coach Tony Dungy's son asked the same question. "Dad, if we go to the Super Bowl, will I be on the field?" James Dungy died last week of an apparent suicide, but if the heavy-hearted Colts make it to Detroit, his spirit will be there alongside a father, family and football world that celebrated his memory yesterday. "We have joy today," Tony Dungy told a congregation estimated at around 2,000 at the Idlewild Baptist Church.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer | October 24, 2010
With NFL players getting bigger and faster, which constantly increases the violence of their collisions, the league needed to take steps to curtail the helmet-to-helmet shots that could have devastating effects. But that doesn't mean offensive and defensive players will find a common ground on the issue, mostly because for years defenders have believed the game is slanted in favor of the people paid to put points on the scoreboard. "I know that feeling because I played defense and coached defense," NBC's Tony Dungy said.
SPORTS
August 15, 2009
A remorseful Michael Vick wants a second chance and vowed to crusade for animal rights with the Philadelphia Eagles - and knows he won't be easily forgiven by fans. "I've done some terrible things, I made a horrible mistake. And now I want to be part of the solution and not the problem," Vick said Friday, referring to his conviction for his role in running a dogfighting ring. Vick was introduced by the Eagles a day after signing a one-year deal for $1.6 million with a team option for a second year for $5.2 million.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.