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Dungeness Crab

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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 4, 2006
Crab is king in San Francisco, where hungry residents wait impatiently for the start of Dungeness crab season every fall. The sweet, clean flavor of just-caught local crab is a thing to be savored. A favorite presentation found at the city's Vietnamese restaurants is roasted crab served in the shell atop an aromatic pillow of garlicky noodles. The dish serves as inspiration for this quicker, simpler dish. Dungeness works great here, of course, but equally good results can be had with other crab varieties.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
They came to pay off a wager, but they couldn't escape a little trash talk. California Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer walked humbly to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski's Capitol Hill hideaway on Thursday to pay off their Super Bowl bet, showering Mikulski and Sen. Ben Cardin with cheese, wine and crab -- the West Coast variety. "This is real crab," Feinstein said as she handed a Dungeness crab to the Maryland senators. "It was caught a few days ago in a trap off of the Golden Gate Bridge...It comes with our deepest congratulations.
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NEWS
By Miriam Silver and Miriam Silver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2002
MENDOCINO COAST, Calif. -- Crab is both indulgence and staple in many ports of the world, with each region declaring its variety the best. Marylanders have their blue crabs. On the West Coast, the large Dungeness crab caught in cold ocean waters rewards Pacific Ocean chauvinists with sweet, briny flesh. "Men are risking their lives to produce this incredible delicacy that is only available a few months of the year," says Mel McKinney, innkeeper at the Little River Inn on the Mendocino coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | February 7, 2013
And then there were four. Brooke, Sheldon, Josh and Lizzie disembark from the Celebrity Cruise ship in Juneau, Alaska. They are all thrilled to be there, though Sheldon's Hawaiian faculties are not accustomed to the climate: “I better throw on a couple extra underwear just so I can keep the package nice and warm, you know?” The shivering chefs meet Padma and guest judge Sean Brock at Juneau's top culinary destination: Tracey's King Crab Shack. Their Quickfire challenge is to “take this near-perfect ingredient and make it shine in a dish.” Chef Brock, who hails from Charleston, tells them he's been on a flight for 13 hours to eat Alaskan King crab.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 13, 1995
Portland, Ore. -- During a recent eating vacation in Portland, I spent a fair amount of time comparing their local crab, the Pacific Dungeness, with ours, the Atlantic blue.Rather than restricting my comparison to the culinary question of which crab dishes can curl my toes with delight, I also looked at crab culture. I looked at what kind of art the local crab inspires. I looked at what kind of bait and tactics crabbers use. I looked at which crab was nastier.Shortly after I got off the plane from Baltimore, I went to a Portland seafood restaurant, McCormick & Schmick's, and ordered crab cakes made with Dungeness crab.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
They came to pay off a wager, but they couldn't escape a little trash talk. California Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer walked humbly to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski's Capitol Hill hideaway on Thursday to pay off their Super Bowl bet, showering Mikulski and Sen. Ben Cardin with cheese, wine and crab -- the West Coast variety. "This is real crab," Feinstein said as she handed a Dungeness crab to the Maryland senators. "It was caught a few days ago in a trap off of the Golden Gate Bridge...It comes with our deepest congratulations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 18, 1994
From sudden plagues of locusts to mysterious declines in sought-after creatures like the Dungeness crab, the booms and busts of nature have puzzled researchers. A new study suggests that scientists may sometimes have difficulty finding an environmental cause simply because there is not one.In the study published recently in the journal Science, researchers at the University of California at Davis found evidence that many animals, even when they are unperturbed by unusual weather or any other alterations in their environment, can undergo wildly unpredictable changes in their numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | February 7, 2013
And then there were four. Brooke, Sheldon, Josh and Lizzie disembark from the Celebrity Cruise ship in Juneau, Alaska. They are all thrilled to be there, though Sheldon's Hawaiian faculties are not accustomed to the climate: “I better throw on a couple extra underwear just so I can keep the package nice and warm, you know?” The shivering chefs meet Padma and guest judge Sean Brock at Juneau's top culinary destination: Tracey's King Crab Shack. Their Quickfire challenge is to “take this near-perfect ingredient and make it shine in a dish.” Chef Brock, who hails from Charleston, tells them he's been on a flight for 13 hours to eat Alaskan King crab.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 23, 2008
When it comes to crabs, I am provincial. Because I reside in Maryland, home of the blue crab, I have a hard time working up interest in "outsider" crabs, the ones that hail from beyond the Chesapeake Bay region. Life is good here, I tell myself; why look beyond the borders for pleasure? Yet, recently, I found myself enjoying the company of strangers - crabs from Alaska, Florida and Oregon. I did this during eating adventures in two Baltimore restaurants, the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East and McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurant at Pier 5 in the Inner Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2013
Michael Mina's name is familiar to Baltimore restaurant-goers from the suite of restaurants he developed for the Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore - Wit & Wisdom, Pabu and Lamill Coffee. But Mina's base of operations is in San Francisco, and the Michelin-starred chef is a hardcore 49ers fan. He'll be attending the Super Bowl in New Orleans with his sons. Mina has advice for folks throwing a Super Bowl potluck party at home. His cioppino can be made in advance, so the hosts and their guests can give their full attention to the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2013
Michael Mina's name is familiar to Baltimore restaurant-goers from the suite of restaurants he developed for the Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore - Wit & Wisdom, Pabu and Lamill Coffee. But Mina's base of operations is in San Francisco, and the Michelin-starred chef is a hardcore 49ers fan. He'll be attending the Super Bowl in New Orleans with his sons. Mina has advice for folks throwing a Super Bowl potluck party at home. His cioppino can be made in advance, so the hosts and their guests can give their full attention to the game.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 23, 2008
When it comes to crabs, I am provincial. Because I reside in Maryland, home of the blue crab, I have a hard time working up interest in "outsider" crabs, the ones that hail from beyond the Chesapeake Bay region. Life is good here, I tell myself; why look beyond the borders for pleasure? Yet, recently, I found myself enjoying the company of strangers - crabs from Alaska, Florida and Oregon. I did this during eating adventures in two Baltimore restaurants, the Oceanaire Seafood Room in Harbor East and McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurant at Pier 5 in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 4, 2006
Crab is king in San Francisco, where hungry residents wait impatiently for the start of Dungeness crab season every fall. The sweet, clean flavor of just-caught local crab is a thing to be savored. A favorite presentation found at the city's Vietnamese restaurants is roasted crab served in the shell atop an aromatic pillow of garlicky noodles. The dish serves as inspiration for this quicker, simpler dish. Dungeness works great here, of course, but equally good results can be had with other crab varieties.
NEWS
By Miriam Silver and Miriam Silver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2002
MENDOCINO COAST, Calif. -- Crab is both indulgence and staple in many ports of the world, with each region declaring its variety the best. Marylanders have their blue crabs. On the West Coast, the large Dungeness crab caught in cold ocean waters rewards Pacific Ocean chauvinists with sweet, briny flesh. "Men are risking their lives to produce this incredible delicacy that is only available a few months of the year," says Mel McKinney, innkeeper at the Little River Inn on the Mendocino coast.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 13, 1995
Portland, Ore. -- During a recent eating vacation in Portland, I spent a fair amount of time comparing their local crab, the Pacific Dungeness, with ours, the Atlantic blue.Rather than restricting my comparison to the culinary question of which crab dishes can curl my toes with delight, I also looked at crab culture. I looked at what kind of art the local crab inspires. I looked at what kind of bait and tactics crabbers use. I looked at which crab was nastier.Shortly after I got off the plane from Baltimore, I went to a Portland seafood restaurant, McCormick & Schmick's, and ordered crab cakes made with Dungeness crab.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 18, 1994
From sudden plagues of locusts to mysterious declines in sought-after creatures like the Dungeness crab, the booms and busts of nature have puzzled researchers. A new study suggests that scientists may sometimes have difficulty finding an environmental cause simply because there is not one.In the study published recently in the journal Science, researchers at the University of California at Davis found evidence that many animals, even when they are unperturbed by unusual weather or any other alterations in their environment, can undergo wildly unpredictable changes in their numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Baltimore-area "Master Chef" finalist Helene Leeds had her apron confiscated on Tuesday night's episode of Master Chef. In the elimination challenge, the 15 remaining contestants had to prepare a crab dish using either fresh crab meat or canned crab meat. Leeds, a health coach based in Baldwin, was among the fresh-crab bunch. But her Dungeness crab soup with corn bread left the judges panel of Gordon Ramsay, Joe Bastianich and chef Graham Elliot cold. I didn't watch the show, but Baltimore Insider Jill Rosen did. " “She muffed up with an ingredient that as a Baltimorean, she should have won with,” Insider said.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 29, 1998
I SHOOK A CRAB in Portland, Ore. That is how the residents of the Pacific Northwest handle their Dungeness crabs. They "shake" them, a process that involves separating the crab's body into pieces, then pounding the shell of each piece against the edge of a bowl with straight sides.When this procedure is performed correctly, the crab meat easily falls from the shell into the bottom of the bowl. That is what happened when Pansy Bray, a resident of Hoquiam, Wash., and a former fish-house worker, shook a crab.
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