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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 22, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- A 27-year-old actor was killed and another actor was injured Friday on the set of the Fox action-adventure series "Sliders," when a dune buggy they were riding in $l overturned on a dry lake bed 40 miles east of here, authorities said.Kenneth Keith Steadman, 27, of Sherman Oaks was flown by helicopter from the set on El Mirage Dry Lake near Adelanto to San Bernardino County Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead, said Randy Emon of the county coroner's office.The other actor, not identified, was treated for minor injuries, said Libby Gill, a spokeswoman for MCA/Universal Television Group, makers of the program.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Perhaps it was a prank or a desire for an unique Ocean City souvenir, but either way, a portrait of the founder of the Dunes Manor Hotel that hung in the lobby is missing and the hotel wants it back. Police said the hotel reported the theft of the painting depicting Dunes Manor founder Thelma Conner early Sunday morning. The picture went missing sometime during the night, around 3 a.m., when a hotel security guard noticed it was gone. Conner, who founded the Victorian-style hotel in 1987 at the age of 74, is a beloved figure in Ocean City . She was known for her Texas twang and her tea-time tradition.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 25, 1993
PALERMO, N.J. --- When Phil Dubruille retired from his casino carpentry job seven years ago, he quickly decided how he would spend his time: He'd sit and watch the grass grow.Dune grass, that is. Somebody's got to grow the stuff ` it doesn't just sprout up on its own.Somebody's got to take little dune-grass seedlings and put them in sandy ground, and water and fertilize them for a whole year.Somebody's got to yank up the weeds that choke them. And somebody's got to furnish the fully grown stalks to shore towns, which put the tall, slinky grass on the beaches to keep the sand dunes from eroding.
NEWS
By JAMES GERSTENZANG and JAMES GERSTENZANG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2006
YUMA, Ariz. -- Declaring yesterday that "we do not have full control of the border," President Bush visited an area where arrests and deaths of would-be immigrants have risen sharply, and he urged the Senate to complete work on immigration legislation by the end of the month. The president spent about an hour inspecting the arid and stark border sector marked by a 20-foot-tall corrugated metal structure, an 8-foot-high chain-link fence topped by razor-sharp concertina wire, powerful lights, watch towers and video cameras, all deployed in an area where the Border Patrol says the most apprehensions have occurred.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 7, 1996
GUZILIANG VILLAGE, China -- With a mighty roar, the tractor laboring outside Xue Yongquan's house shoveled sand off the road that was once the main route south. The road is blocked, yet again, because the desert is coming closer.When Xue was a boy, Guziliang was a prosperous oasis on the eastern fringe of China's Gobi Desert. But a huge increase in population as well as overuse of the naturally available water has caused the desert to besiege the town, with huge dunes looming in the distance.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | January 7, 1992
With Ocean City's protective sand dune all but washed away by last weekend's storm, a University of Maryland researcher says he doubts the resort's vaunted $44 million beach replenishment project was all it was cracked up to be.Stephen P. Leatherman, director of the coastal research laboratory in College Park, said yesterday Ocean City's man-made dune line should have been able to stand up to a much fiercer storm than the northeaster that smacked the Maryland...
NEWS
By ROBERT FOLSOM | October 2, 2005
Effendi Courtenay Grimwood Spectra (paperback) 432 pages. Ashraf "Raf" Bey is a good chief of detectives in the bad city of El Iskandryia in this sequel to Pashazade, which established a 21st-century world under Ottoman Empire rule. Raf has to investigate the case of billionaire Hamzah Effendi, the father of the woman Raf should have married. But Raf has his hands full: trying to protect the daughter from atrocious secrets, solving murders related to the case, and trying to stay alive.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2000
SOUTH BETHANY BEACH, Del. - Standing on the deck of his rented stilt house, looking out on the fastest-eroding beach in the second-fastest-eroding state in the nation, vacationer Matthew Slifko has a question: "What are the state and the Corps of Engineers going to do about it?" The state of Delaware and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' $22 million answer: They plan to build a 16-foot-high artificial dune - with a 150-foot-wide swath of sand behind it - along a two-mile stretch of shoreline.
NEWS
By JAMES GERSTENZANG and JAMES GERSTENZANG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2006
YUMA, Ariz. -- Declaring yesterday that "we do not have full control of the border," President Bush visited an area where arrests and deaths of would-be immigrants have risen sharply, and he urged the Senate to complete work on immigration legislation by the end of the month. The president spent about an hour inspecting the arid and stark border sector marked by a 20-foot-tall corrugated metal structure, an 8-foot-high chain-link fence topped by razor-sharp concertina wire, powerful lights, watch towers and video cameras, all deployed in an area where the Border Patrol says the most apprehensions have occurred.
NEWS
January 14, 1992
Support the businesses that support youAs co-owner of a business in the Perry Hall area I am proud to say that our business is up considerably over last year.There is a very simple reason for this. We care about our customers and their problems. We take care of them, offer them reasonable prices, get them what they need within one or two days if it is an item we do not stock and give them a pleasant place to shop. Our customers can also depend on the fact that my partner and I are in the store at all times.
NEWS
By ROBERT FOLSOM | October 2, 2005
Effendi Courtenay Grimwood Spectra (paperback) 432 pages. Ashraf "Raf" Bey is a good chief of detectives in the bad city of El Iskandryia in this sequel to Pashazade, which established a 21st-century world under Ottoman Empire rule. Raf has to investigate the case of billionaire Hamzah Effendi, the father of the woman Raf should have married. But Raf has his hands full: trying to protect the daughter from atrocious secrets, solving murders related to the case, and trying to stay alive.
TRAVEL
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,Chicago Tribune | July 3, 2005
All it needs is a camel, maybe a Bedouin tent, or a couple of date palms. The place is that deserty. Great Sand Dunes National Park is centered on mounds of sand that go for 30 square miles, right up against the sort of Colorado landscape one has every reason to expect: mountains with snow on top, rushing creeks, cactus, sagebrush, aspens, cottonwoods and ranchland dotted with grazing bison. The sand is what catches attention, some of it piled nearly eight stories high, magnificent but highly incongruous -- as if Hollywood remade Lawrence of Arabia as a Western.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
ASSATEAGUE ISLAND - It's a bright, dazzlingly blue afternoon on this arid claw of land stretching beside the Atlantic Ocean, and Allison Turner has been slogging for hours through salt marshes and loblolly pines, a rifle slung over her shoulder. Suddenly, she aims at a pony with a shaggy reddish coat munching grass near a dune. A pop sounds as she fires a 4-inch orange dart that pierces the horse's haunch. For the past decade, the National Park Service has been injecting contraceptives into the mares among this herd of 160 wild horses on the Assateague Island National Seashore in an attempt to control the population.
TRAVEL
By Joshua S. Howes and Joshua S. Howes,Chicago Tribune | July 20, 2003
There are things that awe us to rapture -- grand canyons, wild cascades, the immense rolling ocean. And there are other things -- cool-rooted flowers, sunrise in a meadow -- that awe us to silence, that "seal the hushed casket of the soul," as John Keats said. The Sahara at night awes to silence. Yet the ordinary has a way of impinging on the sublime. While I was stretching my limbs atop the world's tallest sand dunes, my traveling companion, Mark, who had come to the Sahara hoping the great dunes might be the elixir for his broken heart, was shut away in a concrete toilet, victim of a bad bowl of tagine stew.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - From the city's hilltops, the trees of the Presidio form luxurious green plumage against winter's crystalline skies. When the U.S. Army planted this urban forest - now a 1,480-acre national park - on ridges and wind-swept sand dunes in the 1880s, it imbued the trees of what was then a military post with deep symbolism. Maj. W.A. Jones, the landscape engineer, wrote that soaring Monterey cypress, eucalyptus and other trees would make the base appear imposing and "indirectly accentuate the idea of the power of government."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
VALENTINE, Neb. - Driving south this summer through north-central Nebraska's lonely Sand Hills cattle country, motorists will notice a soft, irregular tapping on the windshield and under the floorboards. It sounds like the first, heavy drops of a summer thundershower. But it's not raining. Nebraska is one of 14 Western states being seared by extreme drought this year. A more careful look reveals grasshoppers by the thousands, crossing the sun-blistered asphalt and leaping into the path of approaching cars.
NEWS
By EDWARD FLATTAU | February 1, 1992
You don't have to be a professional coastal engineer to recognize that this resort community is dangerously exposed to the Atlantic Ocean. The pilings of beach houses foolishly built in front of the dune line stand in deep pools of salt water that linger long after the January 4 storm that struck the Delaware and Maryland shore with devastating impact.The dunes themselves have vanished along much of the coast within 10 miles of here in either direction, due to the same tempest. That leaves some communities with only a narrow stretch of unstable beach between them and the unruly Atlantic, with more nasty winter storms likely.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff Reporter Robert Hilson Jr. contributed to this story | November 1, 1991
OCEAN CITY -- Storm-driven surf subsided today after a day of snapping at the sea wall, surging up to the boardwalk, nipping away at dunes, dune grass and fences dedicated just this week as part of a $44 million beach replenishment project.Tides surged 4 to 5 feet above normal highs yesterday afternoon, flooding much of the south end of Ocean City, the Inlet and most of the streets along the length of the bay side."It's the worst high tide since the 1962 northeaster," said Terence J. McGean, acting city engineer.
NEWS
By Amy S. Rosenberg and Amy S. Rosenberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 14, 2001
CAPE MAY, N.J. - Well, it's about that time again at the scenic Cove Restaurant, when winter is receding and Ed Johnston begins the process of opening up his little beachfront restaurant for the season at the western tip of this seaside town. It's time for Ed to start shoveling sand. Mountains of it have blown onto his property, making his place look like the day after a blizzard. The sand covers his parking lot, drifts up along his boarded-up deck, blows against the door, jams the lock, creeps through the door threshold all the way into the restaurant, where little cone-shaped piles of sand sit on the tables.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
ASSATEAGUE ISLAND - Just below the dunes and far enough above the high tide line to be safe from waves and people, a rare and vulnerable plant spreads its stems under the sand on this wide beach, poking up green leaves that hide thousands of tiny seed pods. It is seabeach amaranth, once common on beaches from Massachusetts to the Carolinas but not seen here for more than 30 years, or in Delaware for 125 years. The plant, which is on the federal list of threatened species, seems to be staging a comeback on mid-Atlantic beaches, aided in part by federal and state agencies.
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