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By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
A 46-year-old state employee died after he was struck by a truck Tuesday morning at the Dundalk Marine Terminal, according to Maryland Transportation Authority police. The man, who worked for the Maryland Environmental Service, was struck about 10:15 a.m. near Berth No. 14 at the port of Baltimore, said Sgt. Jonathan Green, a transportation police spokesman. The victim was hit by a three-axle truck owned and operated by the environmental agency, Green said. The man had been driving the truck, parked it and got out, and a few seconds later, realized the it was moving, Green said.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 12, 2011
In an era of high unemployment - and with many of the gainfully employed working too many hours because companies are either still downsizing or avoiding new hires - it would be helpful if the Maryland Court of Appeals allowed this question to be decided by a jury: Should an employer be held responsible when an overworked, sleep-deprived employee causes a terrible accident? That's the question at the center of a lawsuit that has been grinding through the state courts for a few years.
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NEWS
March 31, 1992
Baltimore fire officials recovered the body of a diver this morning who apparently got into trouble while working on the hull of a ship at the Dundalk Marine Terminal.Acting Lt. Neil Schmidt, a city fire department spokesman, said few details were available, but that a body was recovered about 11 a.m. The diver's identity was not available.Other fire and police officials said rescue personnel were sent to Berth 5 at the terminal about 10:30 a.m. after a report that a diver did not surface.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Colleagues and supervisors mourned the loss of a state worker who was killed while trying to stop an out-of-control truck Tuesday morning at the Dundalk Marine Terminal, remembering James Mills Gillus as a dedicated and well-liked employee. Police believe Gillus, a 46-year-old Dundalk man and equipment operator for the Maryland Environmental Service, noticed his truck rolling backward shortly after he had parked it about 10:15 a.m. near Berth 14, said Sgt. Jonathan Green, a spokesman for Maryland Transportation Authority police.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Colleagues and supervisors mourned the loss of a state worker who was killed while trying to stop an out-of-control truck Tuesday morning at the Dundalk Marine Terminal, remembering James Mills Gillus as a dedicated and well-liked employee. Police believe Gillus, a 46-year-old Dundalk man and equipment operator for the Maryland Environmental Service, noticed his truck rolling backward shortly after he had parked it about 10:15 a.m. near Berth 14, said Sgt. Jonathan Green, a spokesman for Maryland Transportation Authority police.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
Stevedoring company Ceres Terminals Inc. is expanding its cargo operations at the port of Baltimore, leasing an additional 12 acres at Dundalk Marine Terminal from the Maryland Port Administration, state officials said Thursday. Ceres now leases 5 acres at Dundalk from the port administration. The company will be handling roll-on, roll-off cargo business — typically construction and farm equipment — for Hoegh Autoliners, which is moving its European Service vessels to the Dundalk terminal.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2002
James Antkowiak's regular vehicle is a 1995 Dodge pickup. But yesterday, the Baltimore longshoreman started his workday in the contoured driver's seat of a $55,000 Porsche Boxster fresh off the boat from Germany. "How many people get to drive Porsches, you know?" Antkowiak said, while the blue Boxster convertible purred in neutral. "When you're a little kid you think about cars like this, and then you get to drive them. It's fun." The first of about 400 of the luxury sports cars rolled across the Dundalk Marine Terminal yesterday morning as part of a minimum two-year deal with the auto manufacturer that will give the port's vehicle import business an added measure of prestige.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 4, 1996
Veterans are invited to participate Saturday when the Liberty ship John W. Brown commemorates Veterans Day with a voyage from Dundalk Marine Terminal to the HarborView on Key Highway.Veterans may call (410) 661-1550 to register.Pub Date: 11/04/96
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | March 9, 2008
A while back, a reader in Hamilton asked for the highest wind speed ever recorded in Baltimore. The National Weather Service never got me the answer. So Sun librarian Paul McCardell pulled some clips. Gusts at Friendship Airport (now BWI) reached 84 mph during Hurricane Hazel in October 1954. Winds were clocked at 90 mph June 29, 1980, at Dundalk Marine Terminal, when they toppled an 800-ton container crane. Maybe not the highest winds ever here, but serious contenders.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
The Maryland Port Administration has reached an agreement with Ceres Marine Terminals to create a private "mini-terminal" at the Dundalk Marine Terminal.The terminal will be similar to one Maersk Inc./Universal Maritime Service Corp. has operated at the Dundalk terminal since November.Under the agreement, approved yesterday by the Board of Public Works, the MPA and Ceres will pay for improvements and modifications to an 88-acre site, which will be leased to Ceres.The MPA will pay $800,000 of the $1.5 million cost to build a computerized gate, fence the area and make other improvements.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
A 46-year-old state employee died after he was struck by a truck Tuesday morning at the Dundalk Marine Terminal, according to Maryland Transportation Authority police. The man, who worked for the Maryland Environmental Service, was struck about 10:15 a.m. near Berth No. 14 at the port of Baltimore, said Sgt. Jonathan Green, a transportation police spokesman. The victim was hit by a three-axle truck owned and operated by the environmental agency, Green said. The man had been driving the truck, parked it and got out, and a few seconds later, realized the it was moving, Green said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
Stevedoring company Ceres Terminals Inc. is expanding its cargo operations at the port of Baltimore, leasing an additional 12 acres at Dundalk Marine Terminal from the Maryland Port Administration, state officials said Thursday. Ceres now leases 5 acres at Dundalk from the port administration. The company will be handling roll-on, roll-off cargo business — typically construction and farm equipment — for Hoegh Autoliners, which is moving its European Service vessels to the Dundalk terminal.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | October 18, 2009
Capt. George Jefferson Price, a retired Pan American World Airways pilot, adventurer and raconteur, packed a lot of living into a life that ended at 96 earlier this month, when he died at a Coral Gables, Fla., nursing home. Price's professional ties to Baltimore were through Pan Am, which he joined in 1942 aboard flying boats and later as a first officer aboard the famed M-130, better known to travelers as the China Clipper, that was built at the Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | March 9, 2008
A while back, a reader in Hamilton asked for the highest wind speed ever recorded in Baltimore. The National Weather Service never got me the answer. So Sun librarian Paul McCardell pulled some clips. Gusts at Friendship Airport (now BWI) reached 84 mph during Hurricane Hazel in October 1954. Winds were clocked at 90 mph June 29, 1980, at Dundalk Marine Terminal, when they toppled an 800-ton container crane. Maybe not the highest winds ever here, but serious contenders.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
Attorney Peter Angelos said yesterday that Maryland should compel Honeywell International to clean up more than a half-dozen chrome waste dumps around Baltimore's harbor - and said he's willing to fight a legal battle to force the issue. Angelos, who built a reputation with asbestos and tobacco litigation, is representing the community group Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) in an attempt to require the New Jersey-based manufacturing company to remove chromium beneath the Dundalk Marine Terminal and elsewhere.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2006
A community group is trying to force a New Jersey-based manufacturing company to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to remove a cancer-causing chemical from a state-owned shipping center on the Baltimore waterfront. Organizers of Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) said they want Honeywell International Inc. to remove millions of cubic yards of chromium - waste from a former chrome factory - from beneath the Dundalk Marine Terminal, where it was dumped decades ago to fill wetlands.
NEWS
January 21, 2005
Suddenly on January 18, 2005, LARRY A., beloved husband of Sheila Johnson; devoted father of Craig, Tracey, Vickie, and Larshea. Also survived by one uncle, one aunt, members of the Dundalk Marine Terminal, Local 333, and a host of other relatives, and friends. Friends may call at the Gary P. March Funeral Home, 270 Fred Hilton Pass, on Friday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Family will receive friends at the Morning Star Baptist Church, 154 Winters Lane, Catonsville, MD, on Saturday at 12 noon.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 26, 2006
Our political leaders have all but ignored the No. 1 terrorist menace - the chance that bad guys will steal poorly guarded nuclear weapons in the former Soviet Union. But don't worry: Once loose nukes are stolen, smuggled on a ship and waiting to blow up in Baltimore's harbor, politicians will make darn sure the innocent longshoreman unloading them won't be supervised by an Arab company. Feel better? Save us from these saviors. The firestorm over Dubai Ports World's $6.8 billion acquisition of the British Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co., which manages terminals in Baltimore and five other U.S. ports, is about brainless politics and economic jingoism.
NEWS
January 21, 2005
Suddenly on January 18, 2005, LARRY A., beloved husband of Sheila Johnson; devoted father of Craig, Tracey, Vickie, and Larshea. Also survived by one uncle, one aunt, members of the Dundalk Marine Terminal, Local 333, and a host of other relatives, and friends. Friends may call at the Gary P. March Funeral Home, 270 Fred Hilton Pass, on Friday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Family will receive friends at the Morning Star Baptist Church, 154 Winters Lane, Catonsville, MD, on Saturday at 12 noon.
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