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Dundalk Community College

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By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1995
Felix T. Haynes, a veteran education administrator from Illinois, has been named president of Dundalk Community College, which has 3,400 students and a $13.7 million operating budget.In a telephone interview, Dr. Haynes, 48, said he looks forward to the "challenge of heading Dundalk. We have challenges, educationally and financially, because the American public no longer blindly supports higher education. We have to prove our quality, improve our accountability."He was selected from 69 applicants by Daniel J. LaVista, chancellor of Baltimore County's three two-year colleges.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Ralph R. Baney, a sculptor and ceramic artist who taught at Dundalk Community College, died of an aortic aneurysm Jan. 21 at his Ellicott City home. He was 84. Born in Trinidad, he was the son of Baney Seecharan and Bhagia Seecharan. After study at the Teachers' College in Trinidad and Tobago, he won a government scholarship to Brighton College of Art in England. "He worked in the style of the British sculptors Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth," said Paul W. Glasgow, interim chair of the art and design department at what is now the Community College of Baltimore County.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1991
In expectation of a tuition increase of $4 per credit, Dundalk Community College today announced layoffs, a three-day furlough and a halt to certain public uses of its campus to make up for state budget cuts.Tuition costs at Baltimore County's three community colleges are likely to increase by $4 per credit when the college Board of Trustees meets Nov. 13. Anticipating that action, Dundalk President Martha Smith has ordered moves to cope with a $1.4 million state cut in her college's $13.1 million budget.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | October 29, 2009
Rosemary T. Brozena, who realized a life dream of earning a college degree when she was in her 50s, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at Oak Crest Village retirement community. She was 86. Rosemary Piscotty, the daughter of an anthracite coal miner and a mother who owned and operated a grocery store, was born and raised in Plymouth, Pa. She was a 1941 graduate of Plymouth High School and attended Wilkes-Barre Business College. During World War II, she worked at Olmsted Air Force Base near Harrisburg, Pa., from 1943 to 1948.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1998
The 11-year-old sitting in Biology 101 at Dundalk Community College looks more like someone's kid brother than a student in the class -- until he starts conducting a complicated experiment with sugar molecules and bacteria.He also works comfortably with lab partners three times his age, earns straight A's in an array of subjects and was nominated for president of the student government.He's even starting a Japanese animation club to expose other students to his passion.With a self-assuredness that belies his age, Jeff Peck has taken the college by storm this school year.
NEWS
July 31, 1996
A college registration directory published in Sunday's Education section misstated the address of Dundalk Community College, which is 7200 Sollers Point Road, Baltimore 21222.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/31/96
NEWS
October 11, 1991
Dundalk Community College, the Maryland Job Service at Eastpoint and the Eastern Baltimore Area Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a "Blue Collar Job Fair" from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 22 at the college, 7200 Sollers Point Road.Further information may be obtained by calling Wayne Ching at 285-9806.
NEWS
June 28, 1993
Dr. Ralph Baney of Ellicott City will be participating in two international exhibitions. A professor of art at Dundalk Community College, he recently had his piece "Oracle" in an all-sculpture show at the Cast Iron Gallery in New York.This show will travel to Japan, where it will be on exhibit from Oct. 3 to Nov. 15 in Kyoto. During the summer, Dr. Baney and his wife Vera, also an artist and teacher at Dundalk Community College, will have a joint show at Gallery 101 in Port of Spain, Trinidad.
NEWS
July 28, 1991
The fall semester at Dundalk Community College is offering a comprehensive array of career training using the latest technology.DCC's Computer Information Systems program has expanded its capabilities with the addition of an IBM AS-400 mini-computer system. The updated computer system results from a $100,000 challenge grant awarded to DCC by the State of Maryland.For the first time, DCC is also offering beginning, intermediate and advanced Statistical Analysis System courses to the public.
NEWS
January 5, 1992
To help those students affected by the increase in tuition and fees at Dundalk Community College, the college has designated an additional $20,000 for student financial aid.Provided through the college foundation and special auxiliary fTC enterprises, the funds are available to full-time and part-time DCC students. No funds will be used from the college's operating budget. The college has also established a deferred payment plan, which will allow students to spread their tuition payments throughout the semester.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 18, 1999
Three southern Baltimore students will receive a total of $6,000 in college scholarships at 6 p.m. today during a ceremony at Harbor Hospital Center's Life Course Center.Communities Working Together -- a group of local businesses and community groups -- will present the scholarships, which are funded by Baltimore RESCO, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and Sherwin-Williams Co.The recipients are Shira Bethea of Mount Winans, an honor roll student at Western High School who plans to attend Morgan State University; Mary K. Clark of Westport, a Southwestern High graduate planning to study nursing at Dundalk Community College or the Medix School; and Anthony Falcon of Cherry Hill, a National Honor Society member and graduate of Baltimore City College who will attend Hampton (Va.)
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1998
The 11-year-old sitting in Biology 101 at Dundalk Community College looks more like someone's kid brother than a student in the class -- until he starts conducting a complicated experiment with sugar molecules and bacteria.He also works comfortably with lab partners three times his age, earns straight A's in an array of subjects and was nominated for president of the student government.He's even starting a Japanese animation club to expose other students to his passion.With a self-assuredness that belies his age, Jeff Peck has taken the college by storm this school year.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1997
Local law enforcement officials gathered at Dundalk Community College yesterday to celebrate the opening of the new Baltimore County Police Academy -- a partnership expected to shore up the college's sagging enrollment and save the county $1.6 million."
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
Baltimore County's police training academy will be moved from its aging facility on Parkwood Road in Dundalk to the enrollment-strapped Dundalk Community College, under a plan being announced today by police department and college officials.The move, to begin with the June 1997 class of about 60 recruits, is intended to secure the future of Dundalk Community College and is expected to save the Police Department more than $1 million in renovation costs at the old academy, officials say."I think this is a win-win situation," said County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
NEWS
July 31, 1996
A college registration directory published in Sunday's Education section misstated the address of Dundalk Community College, which is 7200 Sollers Point Road, Baltimore 21222.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/31/96
NEWS
By David J. O'Neill | May 25, 1996
I WISH TO respond to your May 13 editorial and to recent attacks on Dundalk Community College by a few county politicians.I found the editorial unenlightened and the reasoning fallacious.The editorial concluded that the Baltimore County Council shouldn't spare Dundalk Community College if it can't do a better job of justifying expenditures and cited ''foolish mistakes'' made by the ''college system.''Most concerns highlighted in the editorial are the result of actions taken by the board of trustees and the tri-college administration before the chancellor, Daniel LaVista, was hired.
NEWS
July 31, 1991
Dundalk Community College will offer several off-campus courses in chemical dependency counseling and retail floristry during the fall semester.DCC's Chemical Dependency Counseling program will offer two evening courses on the campuses of Catonsville and Carroll Community Colleges. The "Effects of Alcohol and Drugs" will be taught from 7:05 to 9:50 p.m. on Wednesdays at Carroll Community College, and on Mondays at Catonsville Community College. "Group Counseling: General" will be taught from 7:05 to 9:50 p.m. on Mondays at the Carroll campus, and on Tuesdays at the Catonsville campus.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 18, 1999
Three southern Baltimore students will receive a total of $6,000 in college scholarships at 6 p.m. today during a ceremony at Harbor Hospital Center's Life Course Center.Communities Working Together -- a group of local businesses and community groups -- will present the scholarships, which are funded by Baltimore RESCO, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and Sherwin-Williams Co.The recipients are Shira Bethea of Mount Winans, an honor roll student at Western High School who plans to attend Morgan State University; Mary K. Clark of Westport, a Southwestern High graduate planning to study nursing at Dundalk Community College or the Medix School; and Anthony Falcon of Cherry Hill, a National Honor Society member and graduate of Baltimore City College who will attend Hampton (Va.)
NEWS
May 22, 1996
WHEN HEARINGS BEGAN last month on Baltimore County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger III's fiscal 1997 budget, Councilman Douglas B. Riley noted that he and his colleagues could make two kinds of cuts.They could cut for the sake of cutting, to make themselves look as fiscally conservative as possible to voters, who especially value that quality these days. Or they could act maturely, eschewing token trims and making responsible reductions. To the council's credit, it took the latter route.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 17, 1995
Trend report! Shopper snacking on rise in supermarkets. Says who? Says me and at least one other guy. I've been noticing this for months but refrained from declaring it a trend until at least one other observer concurred. (That's really all a trend spotter needs, you know.) Concurrence came yesterday from a keen-eyed Baltimorean who sees this as another signpost on the road to moral ruin. "And," says he, "people who already have gone a long distance toward being public slobs don't seem to care if they're spotted anymore."
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