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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1996
Before gangsta raps there were raps about libraries and teen-age pregnancy; before Dannemora State Prison and the killing bullets, there were pillow fights and the exuberance of youth.Tupac Amaru Shakur did not grow up in Baltimore. He was not a finished product when he left. But his years here encompassed that crucial time when childhood ends and self-discovery begins.He was 14 when he and his mother moved here from the Bronx in 1985. He called himself MC New York and won a rap contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
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By Erica L. Green and Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Baltimore school officials are investigating hazing allegations involving the Paul Laurence Dunbar High School football program, and parents are protesting the possibility that the school's celebrated coach might be removed. School officials declined to give details about the allegations or the investigation's status, saying the inquiry is continuing. "As the CEO, my job is to come to the aid of children," interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards said in an interview. "If a child is hurt, disrespected, harmed in any form or fashion, it's my job to find out. " Edwards declined to elaborate.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Paul E. Smith, former head basketball coach at Dunbar High School and McDonogh School who later coached in Baltimore County public schools, died Monday of kidney failure at Maryland General Hospital. The Randallstown resident was 71. "Paul coached for the love of basketball and working with young people," said Ronald Belinko, who had been director of athletics for Baltimore County for 46 years until retiring earlier this year. "He knew how to work with kids and coached for all the right reasons and without any ego. " Paul Everett Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2500 block of McCulloh St. He graduated in 1959 from Frederick Douglass High School, where he had been captain of the basketball and baseball teams his senior year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Paul E. Smith, former head basketball coach at Dunbar High School and McDonogh School who later coached in Baltimore County public schools, died Monday of kidney failure at Maryland General Hospital. The Randallstown resident was 71. "Paul coached for the love of basketball and working with young people," said Ronald Belinko, who had been director of athletics for Baltimore County for 46 years until retiring earlier this year. "He knew how to work with kids and coached for all the right reasons and without any ego. " Paul Everett Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2500 block of McCulloh St. He graduated in 1959 from Frederick Douglass High School, where he had been captain of the basketball and baseball teams his senior year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Marjorie J. Bowers, who worked as a senior administrative assistant for city public schools for nearly three decades, died Aug. 22 of complications from leukemia at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 87. The daughter of a minister and a nurse, Marjorie Jones was born in Chestertown and later moved to East Baltimore with her family, where she graduated in 1942 from Dunbar High School. After graduating the next year from the old Cortez Peters Business School on Eutaw Place, Mrs. Bowers went to work as a secretary at Dunbar High School, rising to head secretary.
NEWS
November 21, 2009
Walter Breeden Austin, a retired Department of Public Works foreman, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 13 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Cedonia resident was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised on North Spring Street, he attended Dunbar High School. As a young man, he worked at neighborhood movie theaters, including the old Ritz, Radio, Dunbar and Harlem. "He took care of everything at the theaters," said Frances Carr, a niece. "On Saturdays he would take his daughter, his nieces and nephews and cousins.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Stephen Henderson and Jean Thompson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1997
Baltimore school officials fired a Paul Laurence Dunbar High School business manager yesterday as police investigated a report of $32,000 missing from a school account made up of money raised by students and parents.During a news conference and in a press release issued yesterday, school officials identified the employee as Christine White, 30, of Baltimore and said she was under investigation.Police spokesman Robert W. Weinhold Jr. and Leonard Hamm, chief of police for the schools, confirmed that an investigation had begun.
NEWS
August 5, 1992
NEWS THAT New Jersey entrepreneur Henry M. Rowan is donating $100 million to Glassboro State College has overshadowed a Baltimore native's equally noteworthy gift to Harvard Law School.Reginald F. Lewis, who was raised in West Baltimore and graduated from Dunbar High School, announced recently that he will be giving $3 million to Harvard Law School -- the largest single gift in the school's 175-year history.Mr. Lewis, 48, is not a well-known figure in Baltimore because most of his career has been spent in the boardrooms of New York and European capitals.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE AND SARA NEUFELD and JOHN FRITZE AND SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTERS | July 7, 2006
A proposal to borrow $36 million to rehabilitate Baltimore schools has stalled in the City Council because of questions over how the capital improvement money is being allocated - a conflict that is likely to result in a showdown on the council floor next week. City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., who chairs the Taxation and Finance Committee, has delayed a committee vote on the borrowing because he has questions about why some school building projects that received funding in previous years require more money.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2011
— In the past two days at the University of Maryland, for a couple hours in each, the Dunbar boys basketball team took over the Comcast Center court like it was its own. The No. 4 Poets, prepped by their demanding regular-season schedule in Baltimore City, proved to be a cut above the rest of the Class 1A field. Their final assignment was Saturday's state championship game against Williamsport. Getting separation in the second quarter and then controlling the second half with defense, Dunbar repeated as champions, bringing home the program's 13th state crown with a thorough 64-43 win over the Wildcats from Washington County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Marjorie J. Bowers, who worked as a senior administrative assistant for city public schools for nearly three decades, died Aug. 22 of complications from leukemia at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 87. The daughter of a minister and a nurse, Marjorie Jones was born in Chestertown and later moved to East Baltimore with her family, where she graduated in 1942 from Dunbar High School. After graduating the next year from the old Cortez Peters Business School on Eutaw Place, Mrs. Bowers went to work as a secretary at Dunbar High School, rising to head secretary.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
It isn't unusual for students to remember the impact a teacher had on them well into adulthood, but on Saturday, many students of former Baltimore music teacher Lucille Marcus Brooks had an unusual opportunity to tell her — more than a half-century after they sat in her classroom. About 150 people, including many former students, packed Union Baptist Church to celebrate 100 years of Brooks' life, three-quarters of which she has devoted to grooming some of the region's finest musicians.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
School never closed this summer for about 30 Baltimore City middle-school students. They arrive at Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School with enthusiasm for a day that may be shorter and more laid-back, but still enhances their academic and athletic skills. These kids are reading books of their own choosing, writing in their personal journals, zipping through math calculations and working out on the basketball court. They spend two hours a day in an air-conditioned classroom and two in the gym — cooled only with fans — at the school on West Lexington Street, a few miles from downtown.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 28, 2011
Only recently, with the controversy over the proposed demolition of the Read's drugstore at Howard and Lexington, are we beginning to take note of Baltimore's important and early role in the civil rights movement. A few weeks ago, a copy of a new book, "Round and Round Together," arrived with much to say. Its title refers to Gwynn Oak's merry-go-round, which the author treats as a kind of centerpiece and metaphor for the local movement of the 1950s and 1960s. I later spoke with the author, Amy Singewald Nathan, a Baltimorean from Hunting Ridge who had just graduated Western High School during the summer of 1963, when Gwynn Oak was the subject of national attention.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Band teacher Charles Funn's voice thundered in a classroom at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, shouting the names of familiar Southern foods as a way to help the students to find their rhythm. You can feel both, he explained, in your soul. "Fried chicken, greens, hot sauce, potato salad," Funn instructed above the small assembly of squealing trumpets and booming bass drums that clumsily converged as students struggled to raise their instruments and legs at the same time. "Grease!"
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 18, 2011
Former state delegate Ruth M. Kirk, who served West Baltimore's 44th District for 28 years, died June 17 of heart failure at her home in Baltimore. The lifelong West Baltimore resident was 81. Mrs. Kirk was born Ruth Simmons in Baltimore in 1930, the fifth of eight children. She attended Baltimore City public schools through the ninth grade and received her GED, her family said. She held several jobs before her political career, including work as a house cleaner and in early childhood education.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
School never closed this summer for about 30 Baltimore City middle-school students. They arrive at Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School with enthusiasm for a day that may be shorter and more laid-back, but still enhances their academic and athletic skills. These kids are reading books of their own choosing, writing in their personal journals, zipping through math calculations and working out on the basketball court. They spend two hours a day in an air-conditioned classroom and two in the gym — cooled only with fans — at the school on West Lexington Street, a few miles from downtown.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2011
— In the past two days at the University of Maryland, for a couple hours in each, the Dunbar boys basketball team took over the Comcast Center court like it was its own. The No. 4 Poets, prepped by their demanding regular-season schedule in Baltimore City, proved to be a cut above the rest of the Class 1A field. Their final assignment was Saturday's state championship game against Williamsport. Getting separation in the second quarter and then controlling the second half with defense, Dunbar repeated as champions, bringing home the program's 13th state crown with a thorough 64-43 win over the Wildcats from Washington County.
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