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By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Dun & Bradstreet Corp. has entered into a definitive agreement to sell its Baltimore-based subsidiary, American Credit Indemnity Co., to Europe's largest credit insurer and a New York merchant banking firm for an undisclosed price, the company said yesterday.Paris-based Compagnie Financiere SFAC, a $2.9 billion-asset credit insurer, and Securitas Capital LLC have formed ACI lTC Holding Inc. to acquire American Credit. The deal is expected to close by September after it is approved by insurance regulators, executives said.
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January 23, 2012
The Environmental Business Journal has recognized Sovereign Consulting Inc., an environmental consulting and remediation firm with an office in Edgewood, as one of the top medium-sized environmental businesses in the United States. Sovereign received a Bronze Medal for Business Achievement in 2011. The Environmental Business Journal honored Sovereign Consulting for its business successes over the last five years. Sovereign's 2011 revenue was approximately $48 million in 2011, up from $26.6 million in 2007.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 1997
CEOS: Nearly 60 percent of the nation's top corporate executives -- including chief executive officers, partners, owners, presidents, chairmen and principals -- are in their 40s or 50s, says Dun & Bradstreet, the business information company. Dun & Bradstreet found 29.4 percent of top executives are 40 or over, while 29.9 percent are in their 50s, 17.9 percent in their 60s, 7.4 percent in their 70s and 1.6 percent are octogenarians.TPI: The cost of travel has been rising at a much faster clip than overall inflation, according to the Travel Industry of Association.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2003
Robert C. Rogers Sr., a retired salesman for Dun & Bradstreet and a longtime supporter of the McDonogh School, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital of a cardiac arrest. He was 88 and lived in Lutherville. Born in Waverly, he graduated from McDonogh School in 1933, a connection he would cherish for the rest of his years. "His father died when he was 9," said his son Robert C. Rogers Jr. of Timonium. "So I think for him McDonogh was his father." And also, briefly, his home. In 1935, Mr. Rogers married the daughter of the school's gardener, Anne Slonaker.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
In what could be a sign that Maryland's economy may be weakening, the number of business failures rose in the first quarter of the year, the Dun & Bradstreet Corp. has reported.Although local business people and bankruptcy lawyers disputed the analysis, the Wilton, Conn.-based research company said the number of business failures has been rising steadily in Maryland since 1993.And in the first three months of 1995, the number of businesses that declared bankruptcy, closed or caused losses for creditors reached 385, 19 percent more than in the same period a year ago."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2003
Robert C. Rogers Sr., a retired salesman for Dun & Bradstreet and a longtime supporter of the McDonogh School, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital of a cardiac arrest. He was 88 and lived in Lutherville. Born in Waverly, he graduated from McDonogh School in 1933, a connection he would cherish for the rest of his years. "His father died when he was 9," said his son Robert C. Rogers Jr. of Timonium. "So I think for him McDonogh was his father." And also, briefly, his home. In 1935, Mr. Rogers married the daughter of the school's gardener, Anne Slonaker.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1993
QVC-Paramount hearing setA Delaware court yesterday set a Nov. 16 hearing on QVC Network Inc.'s lawsuit to overturn Paramount Communications Inc.'s takeover defenses. But experts said the battle would be decided in the marketplace, not the courtroom.They said it was highly unlikely that the court would act any time soon to lift the defenses. And unless home shopping channel QVC soon tops Viacom's $10 billion bid, the battle for the entertainment giant might be decided without court action.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,The Dun & Bradstreet Corp | April 27, 1991
Because of continuing real estate and bank troubles, the number and size of Maryland business failures are rising sharply, bankruptcy attorneys and financial experts say.A survey by the Dun & Bradstreet Corp. found that the number of Maryland business failures has doubled in the first three months of 1991, and the size of the failures has rocketed more than tenfold.Howard Rubenstein, a Baltimore attorney who has been handling bankruptcies for 36 years, said he's never seen so many, or such large, business failures as he's seen so far this year.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
H. Michael Cushinsky is a stocky, animated guy with a broad smile and a dream in his heart: to expand his market and sell his product all over the country. Trouble is, most of his potential customers haven't even heard of his product, much less the name of his firm.Which is odd, considering Mr. Cushinsky's company, the Baltimore-based American Credit Indemnity Co., this year celebrated its 100th year in business. Now a division of New York-based Dun & Bradstreet Corp., ACI employs about 285 people -- more than half in Baltimore -- and commands a 70 percent share of its market nationwide.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1994
Senate OKs bankruptcy overhaulThe Senate approved yesterday the first comprehensive overhaul of the nation's bankruptcy laws in 16 years, setting new rules that will make it easier for individuals to repay their debts on installment plans and harder for big corporate debtors to avoid their creditors.The House passed the same bill Wednesday night, so the Senate vote in the early hours of yesterday morning sends the bill to President Clinton, who is expected to sign it.The new legislation imposes many time limits on various steps in the bankruptcy process to hasten the flow of cases through courts and prevent the dissipation of debtors' assets to legal fees.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
The Stroud Group is a family business in the truest sense.For almost two decades, it was operated under a different name as a regional purchasing company by a couple expecting it to provide for them in their later years.Instead, the couple's daughter, Marjorie Waldman, gave the company a new name and has landed it in the top ranks of a high-profile list of small businesses owned by women.The 18-employee Stroud Group can outfit a hotel with all of its needs, from the lamps and plants in the lobby to the curtains and carpet in the guest rooms.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1997
CEOS: Nearly 60 percent of the nation's top corporate executives -- including chief executive officers, partners, owners, presidents, chairmen and principals -- are in their 40s or 50s, says Dun & Bradstreet, the business information company. Dun & Bradstreet found 29.4 percent of top executives are 40 or over, while 29.9 percent are in their 50s, 17.9 percent in their 60s, 7.4 percent in their 70s and 1.6 percent are octogenarians.TPI: The cost of travel has been rising at a much faster clip than overall inflation, according to the Travel Industry of Association.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
Maryland businesses expecting increases in hiring and revenue reached a two-year high recently, according to a survey by the University of Baltimore, signaling continued expansion for the state's economy.But state job growth in the last year hasn't kept pace with revenues, the poll suggested, and a separate survey by Dun & Bradstreet shows that potential for business failures is higher in Maryland than nationally.Three-fourths of companies surveyed by the University of Baltimore said they expect sales growth in the next year, up from 65 percent earlier in 1996.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Dun & Bradstreet Corp. has entered into a definitive agreement to sell its Baltimore-based subsidiary, American Credit Indemnity Co., to Europe's largest credit insurer and a New York merchant banking firm for an undisclosed price, the company said yesterday.Paris-based Compagnie Financiere SFAC, a $2.9 billion-asset credit insurer, and Securitas Capital LLC have formed ACI lTC Holding Inc. to acquire American Credit. The deal is expected to close by September after it is approved by insurance regulators, executives said.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
In what could be a sign that Maryland's economy may be weakening, the number of business failures rose in the first quarter of the year, the Dun & Bradstreet Corp. has reported.Although local business people and bankruptcy lawyers disputed the analysis, the Wilton, Conn.-based research company said the number of business failures has been rising steadily in Maryland since 1993.And in the first three months of 1995, the number of businesses that declared bankruptcy, closed or caused losses for creditors reached 385, 19 percent more than in the same period a year ago."
BUSINESS
October 8, 1994
Senate OKs bankruptcy overhaulThe Senate approved yesterday the first comprehensive overhaul of the nation's bankruptcy laws in 16 years, setting new rules that will make it easier for individuals to repay their debts on installment plans and harder for big corporate debtors to avoid their creditors.The House passed the same bill Wednesday night, so the Senate vote in the early hours of yesterday morning sends the bill to President Clinton, who is expected to sign it.The new legislation imposes many time limits on various steps in the bankruptcy process to hasten the flow of cases through courts and prevent the dissipation of debtors' assets to legal fees.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | December 26, 1991
As more government records are computerized -- from Texas bankruptcy filings to New York drivers' licenses to state voter registration lists -- companies are eagerly buying access to the data and reselling it over computer services.The companies, which range from tiny specialized concerns to big information mills like the Dun & Bradstreet Corp., Prentice-Hall and Mead Data Central, say they are finding increasing demand from banks, law firms, marketers, private investigators and journalists.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 30, 1991
As more government records are computerized -- from Texas bankruptcy filings to New York drivers' licenses to state voter registration lists -- companies are eagerly buying access to the data and reselling it over computer services.The companies, which range from tiny specialized concerns to big information mills such as the Dun & Bradstreet Corp. and Prentice-Hall, say they are finding increasing demand from banks, law firms, marketers, private investigators and journalists."It's evolved to the point now that it's so inexpensive to redistribute data that public data has in effect become a commodity with very low overhead," said Joseph W. Duncan, the chief economist at Dun & Bradstreet.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
H. Michael Cushinsky is a stocky, animated guy with a broad smile and a dream in his heart: to expand his market and sell his product all over the country. Trouble is, most of his potential customers haven't even heard of his product, much less the name of his firm.Which is odd, considering Mr. Cushinsky's company, the Baltimore-based American Credit Indemnity Co., this year celebrated its 100th year in business. Now a division of New York-based Dun & Bradstreet Corp., ACI employs about 285 people -- more than half in Baltimore -- and commands a 70 percent share of its market nationwide.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1993
QVC-Paramount hearing setA Delaware court yesterday set a Nov. 16 hearing on QVC Network Inc.'s lawsuit to overturn Paramount Communications Inc.'s takeover defenses. But experts said the battle would be decided in the marketplace, not the courtroom.They said it was highly unlikely that the court would act any time soon to lift the defenses. And unless home shopping channel QVC soon tops Viacom's $10 billion bid, the battle for the entertainment giant might be decided without court action.
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