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By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 28, 2013
Kathy Stumer from Tuscarora, Pa., was looking for a recipe that her husband's grandmother used to make and called cheese dough. She described it as pillow-like dough squares filled with cottage cheese and topped with breadcrumbs and sour cream. Linda Ziegenbein from Prineville, Ore., saw Stumer's request, which sounded to her like a description of kase knoephla, or cheese dumplings or buttons - an old-style German dish of tender noodle dough stuffed with seasoned cheese. She shared a recipe from the Kulm, N.D., Dorcas Society's 25th anniversary cookbook, circa 1971, submitted by Matilda Brost.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Mary Mossman of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making Polish pumpkin soup with dumplings. She said her grandmother came from Poland and taught her mother Polish cooking, and this soup was a favorite of hers. She was hoping someone would be able to share a recipe for the traditional Polish version of the soup. Jean Suda of Timonium had two grandmothers who came to the U.S. from Poland in the early 1900s, and she has a collection of her mother's and grandmother's recipes, as well as several good Polish cookbooks that she uses regularly.
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FEATURES
By CATHY THOMAS | April 30, 1995
Sometimes Italian dumpling recipes can be problematic. They work perfectly several times, then for some reason, the results are disappointing, even disastrous.Some cooks blame "kitchen gremlins," unknown pranksters who play cruel culinary tricks -- often when the unsuspecting cook is suffering from a case of overconfidence. More likely, these culinary inconsistencies are the result of variations in the ingredients and/or climate. Some recipes are a matter of texture and feel, such as combining just the right amount of flour or water to make a perfect dough.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 28, 2013
Kathy Stumer from Tuscarora, Pa., was looking for a recipe that her husband's grandmother used to make and called cheese dough. She described it as pillow-like dough squares filled with cottage cheese and topped with breadcrumbs and sour cream. Linda Ziegenbein from Prineville, Ore., saw Stumer's request, which sounded to her like a description of kase knoephla, or cheese dumplings or buttons - an old-style German dish of tender noodle dough stuffed with seasoned cheese. She shared a recipe from the Kulm, N.D., Dorcas Society's 25th anniversary cookbook, circa 1971, submitted by Matilda Brost.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 6, 1991
NEW YORK -- The term multicultural has been deployed with such abandon lately that Joseph Ben-Moha, the owner of the Roxy Deli, began to take a more philosophical view of dumplings."
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
Chicken and dumplings? A modicum of magic and a monumental feeling of hunger just seem to go with those words.Doris Johnson of Baltimore must think so, she requested the recipe.Laurie Collacchi, also of Baltimore, answered her request.Collacchi's Chicken and DumplingsServes about 64 pounds chicken parts1 cup all-purpose flour seasoned with salt and pepper to taste2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 tablespoon vegetable oil6 leeks, about 2 cups, sliced6 shallots, about 1 cup, sliced thin6 carrots, peeled, halved and sliced2 celery ribs1 small bay leaf1/2 teaspoon dried thyme3 1/2 cups low-salt chicken broth1/2 cup apple cider or juiceDUMPLINGS:1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour1/2 cup yellow cornmeal1 tablespoon baking powder1/2 teaspoon salt2 tablespoons minced fresh dill1 cup plus 3 tablespoons half-and-halfLightly dredge chicken parts in seasoned flour, shaking off the excess (too much flour absorbs the oil; a bit more oil may be added if necessary)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
Vito A. Favarola of Jarrettsville asked if we could help her find a recipe for sour beef and dumplings.Yes, indeed. Many answers arrived and tester Laura Reiley chose one from Sally J. Breig of Severn, whose recipe "came from a German-Viennese cookbook." Others who responded with similar recipes included Chris Wirchert of Laurel, Jean Nohe of Forest Hill, Lisa Resau of Baltimore, Beth Hunter of Timonium and Deborah Scott of Belcamp.Breig's Sour Beef and DumplingsServes 63 pounds chuck roast, cut into 1-inch cubes2 medium onions, chopped1 1/2 cups cider vinegar1 1/2 cups water4 bay leaves3 tablespoons sugar4 tablespoons pickling spices, wrapped in cheesecloth and tied1 to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil12 gingersnaps1 cup waterDUMPLINGS6 medium potatoes, peeled, cooked, mashed and cooled1 egg1 teaspoon salt1/4 cup cornstarch2/3 cup flourPlace meat in a large glass bowl.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Contributing Writer | March 10, 1993
Scarlett O'Hara doubtless ate her share of chicken and dumplings.The classic dish, which could stretch one precious chicken to two meals, saw many Southerners though harsh economic times.From the big house of antebellum plantations to the sharecropper's cabin, the dish was especially valued after calamities such as the Civil War and the Depression. Those events leveled lofty and low."Nobody had money during those times," says John Egerton, author of "Southern Food: At Home, On the Road, In History" (Knopf, 1987)
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2004
Tonight, MacDuff Stewart will race the clock, mincing and chopping as she prepares her traditional Chinese New Year's dumplings. What's the rush? An ancient Chinese custom that forbids touching sharp objects on New Year's Day. It's bad luck. So if friends want to enjoy her savory dumplings tomorrow when the holiday kicks off, she'd better get chopping. Stewart, 25, a Michigan native with a passion for all things Asian, has been celebrating the Chinese New Year since she was in college.
NEWS
By JUDY REILLY | November 5, 1992
It doesn't get much better than this: Dumplings, homemade from locally grown apples, are for sale for $1.25 each through the American Legion Unit 120 in Taneytown.Place your orders by Nov. 11 by calling 756-2444 or 756-6029; pick up the desserts on Nov. 18 from noon until 5 p.m.Lois Smith, an active member of the American Legion Auxiliary in Taneytown, says members of her group will start baking at 7 a.m. and finish by midafternoon on Nov. 18 to sell you the freshest dumplings around. Stayman apples from her brother-in-law's orchard will be baked in a cinnamon and piecrust dough.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Frieda Schellhase, who worked alongside her husband at the well-known German restaurant he operated in downtown Baltimore, died of heart failure Oct. 30 at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center. The Annapolis-area resident was 91. Frieda Gause was born in Baltimore and raised on Wilkens Avenue. She was a 1939 Western High School graduate. She met her future husband, Otto Schellhase, at the youth fellowship at St. Luke's Lutheran Church. After their 1941 marriage and raising her two sons, she became a hostess at the family restaurant, Schellhase's at 412 N. Howard St. The restaurant was known for its traditional German menu of sour beef and dumplings, oysters, wiener schnitzel, chilled beer and Maryland rye. The restaurant closed in 1980.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 14, 2011
The nights come on earlier. The furnace clicks on. On a humid afternoon, the deep, resonant bell at City Hall sounds the time. It's sour beef's high hour in Baltimore. In the next week, the aged beef from Hickory Chance Farm in Bel Air will be delivered to Zion Lutheran Church in City Hall Plaza, Lexington and Holliday streets in downtown Baltimore. An army of Zion kitchen volunteers will then begin their labors, days at a time. There's the trimming the beef, the marinating, the tubs of flour and riced potatoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
Sometimes, eating at a restaurant is all about the adventure. You can try a dish you've never had before, and maybe even come home with a story to share with friends. At Mat Jip in Charles Village , you might just find both. Mat Jip, which means "Taste House" in Korean, has taken over the space once filled by Famous Yakitori One. A small restaurant to begin with, it has none of the previous tenant's hipster panache. The place is seriously stripped down: A few sheets of paper with house specialties are taped to the stark white walls, and blinds hang from the ceiling, in between tables, to help sequester diners.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 10, 2009
There's a magical Baltimore eating establishment that has nothing to do with a restaurant or family and friends' homes. This time of the year, I crave the church kitchen and those sour beef dinners produced by the hard labors of unheralded volunteer hands. Be warned. This is a difficult date. You must plan ahead; you must not postpone; there can be tiresome lines. And, most of all, you have to like sour beef and dumplings, maybe side dishes of green beans or red cabbage, all served on disposable plates.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | December 6, 2006
Sun Hing Chinese Food Carryout Yung's Carry Out 818 Guilford Ave. -- 410-539-8200 Hours --10:30 a.m.-midnight Mondays-Thursdays; 10:30 a.m.-1 a.m. Fridays-Saturdays; noon-11:30 p.m. Sundays In and out in --4 minutes Here, the broth was watery and almost flavorless and the nine medium-sized dumplings were only so-so. Nothing was noteworthy about this quart of soup, $2.63. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2005
Martha Cukor of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for an item she called "French Froggies." She described them as "denser than a brownie, but not quite fudge." Jeannette Shoemaker of Frederick sent in her own recipe for French Froggies that she has been using for many years, always to great acclaim. These are a chocolate lover's dream - a cross between a brownie and fudge. They are sinfully rich but super delicious. My advice: Cut the squares small; a little goes a long way with this decadent dessert.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
Ella May Ruby does not let 1,000 apples and 150 pounds of dough intimidate her. A baker for most of her 79 years, she can easily take those ingredients and turn them into flaky, golden dumplings for today's Apple Festival at Piney Run Park in Sykesville.She and her husband, Jack, have run the festival since it started 13 years ago. She directs the production, making sure volunteer dumpling-makers have a steady supply of butter, flour, sugar and cinnamon. She relies on unwritten recipes handed down from her grandmother.
NEWS
By Marlene Parrish and By Marlene Parrish,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2001
Tortellini, pirogi, pot stickers, shao mai, kreplach, wontons and other worldly dumplings in the audience, please say hello to another cousin: pelmeny. Pelmeny, sometimes spelled pel'meni in cookbooks, are button-size Russian meat dumplings. They are folded, twisted and shaped exactly like tortellini. After simmering in broth to cook, they are tossed with butter, drizzled with vinegar and eaten as a main course. In Russia, and especially in Siberia where they are a staple, they're prepared in large quantities and kept in the "freezer" -- outdoors in sacks -- to last through the whole winter, ready to be cooked as needed.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2005
I asked the young man behind the counter at Tian Yi what the name of the restaurant meant in English. He smiled sheepishly before answering: "No. 1 in the world." Well, why not aim high, I figured. But, wait. After plowing through an enormous amount of Tian Yi's food later that evening, we realized this little carryout in Waverly deserves some heartfelt kudos. Regular readers will recall my persistent complaint that Baltimore's Chinese carryouts are too timid with their spices and too liberal with their cornstarch and other thickeners that tend to turn all dishes into goo. Not Tian Yi. The young cooks working in a large open kitchen created several potent, nongooey dishes.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 2004
Willettea Robinson of Baltimore requested a recipe for apple dumplings like the ones her mother made years ago. Kathleen Kosinski from North East sent in a recipe for Amish Barn's Apple Dumplings that she copied from The Sun in 1999. She says that everyone always loves them and that she just made a double batch for a birthday dessert. The dumplings are indeed a treat, and with the use of ready-made pie dough, they are a snap to prepare. Any type of apple is fine to use as long as it is small so that the dumpling is a manageable size.
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