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By Judith Bell and Judith Bell,Contributing Writer | April 25, 1993
"Quod Severis Metes" read the wrought-iron gates to Washington's Dumbarton Oaks Gardens, the Latin words arching gracefully over two gilded sheaths of symbolic wheat: "As you sow, so shall you reap."I first stumbled upon this intriguing entrance in 1977. Then a graduate student in art history at American University, I held a part-time job in Georgetown and often trekked through the neighborhoods that were on either side of the commercial bustle of Wisconsin Avenue, admiring the riches in Federal architecture.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 22, 2001
If our gardens are reflections of ourselves, then Barbara Mertz is a woman of mystery, a bit wild, with a quirky sense of humor, a fascination with the past, and little or no interest in calm vistas and orderly beauty. But that won't come as any surprise to anyone who knows what she does for a living. Barbara Mertz, under the pen names Elizabeth Peters and Barbara Michaels, is the best-selling author of 59 mysteries. Lord of the Silent, published this spring, is the latest in a series about the adventures of Amelia Peabody, a 19th-century Egyptologist.
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By Ralph Vigoda and Ralph Vigoda,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 14, 1993
George Washington slept here.Often.So did the Marquis de Lafayette. And Alexander Graham Bell. And Bell's mother.So did Robert E. Lee and Merle Oberon. Ditto John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy and Charles Dickens and Louisa May Alcott and Myrna Loy and Drew Pearson and Henry Kissinger and H. R. Haldeman."Here" is Georgetown, a delightful bit of Washington that looms large here despite being little more than a square mile in size.How many other pieces of land of comparable size have been home to -- or host to -- so many world players, from presidents to ambassadors to movie stars to foreign dignitaries to media moguls to writers and artists?
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By Ralph Vigoda and Ralph Vigoda,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 14, 1993
George Washington slept here.Often.So did the Marquis de Lafayette. And Alexander Graham Bell. And Bell's mother.So did Robert E. Lee and Merle Oberon. Ditto John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy and Charles Dickens and Louisa May Alcott and Myrna Loy and Drew Pearson and Henry Kissinger and H. R. Haldeman."Here" is Georgetown, a delightful bit of Washington that looms large here despite being little more than a square mile in size.How many other pieces of land of comparable size have been home to -- or host to -- so many world players, from presidents to ambassadors to movie stars to foreign dignitaries to media moguls to writers and artists?
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 22, 2001
If our gardens are reflections of ourselves, then Barbara Mertz is a woman of mystery, a bit wild, with a quirky sense of humor, a fascination with the past, and little or no interest in calm vistas and orderly beauty. But that won't come as any surprise to anyone who knows what she does for a living. Barbara Mertz, under the pen names Elizabeth Peters and Barbara Michaels, is the best-selling author of 59 mysteries. Lord of the Silent, published this spring, is the latest in a series about the adventures of Amelia Peabody, a 19th-century Egyptologist.
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October 10, 1990
Andre Grabar, 94, an internationally known expert on Byzantine art, died Friday at his home in Paris. An author, lecturer, and archaeologist, he was born in Kiev, Ukraine, and educated in St. Petersburg. In 1928 he earned a Ph.D. in Byzantine art from the University of Strasbourg, France. He taught art history there until 1937 and at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris until 1966. He was also a professor of early Christian and Byzantine archaeology at the College de France in Paris from 1946 to 1966, and a research professor at Dumbarton Oaks Institute of Harvard University from 1950 to 1964.
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September 16, 2001
FOR 64 YEARS, most of the Baltimore Museum of Art's 34 mosaics from ancient Antioch have remained on the beige stone walls of its central court. They blend into the background so well as to be taken for granted by museum-goers circling to the latest show. Actually, the mosaics are not from Antioch proper. The earthquake that demolished that great city in 526 A.D. probably made its floors unrecoverable. Archaeologists would have had to wreck an unremarkable but populated modern town atop the ruins to find out, and did not. This stuff comes from the ancient suburbs of Antioch.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2005
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra closed its season with a night of dealer's choice. The program on Wednesday at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium offered standard Mozart, Mendelssohn and Stravinsky works that were all selected by a committee of orchestra members. The players also chose the soloist - from within their own ranks. The ensemble did not put its best foot forward at the start. Stravinsky's intricate neoclassical gem, Dumbarton Oaks, sounded underrehearsed, underpowered and underappreciated.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 8, 1991
Ricardo Hoegg, one of four artists currently on exhibit at Knight Gomez (through May 25), creates works of considerable resonance when he succeeds."Mi Abuelo" (My Grandfather), his most successful painting here, shows a determined-looking elderly man, sitting straight-backed in a chair, hands folded on knees, in the middle of a landscape with a smoldering volcano in the distance. In this portrait/landscape, which borders on the surreal, the old man at once represents the best and the worst of age as seen through the eyes of the young -- its authority, its determination, its stubbornness, its preference for the past over the future.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 14, 1994
Gary Vikan, the newly appointed director of the Walters Art Gallery, could reasonably be called a modern-day Renaissance man.He's a serious scholar, a person who tackles whatever he does with dedication and skill, whether that be creating catalogs on Byzantine art or writing a paper on Elvis Presley's Graceland. He's a man who on first meeting seems reticent, but is warm and even endearing to those who know him well.He possesses a wry sense of humor, plays a fair game of golf and can cook up a storm.
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By Judith Bell and Judith Bell,Contributing Writer | April 25, 1993
"Quod Severis Metes" read the wrought-iron gates to Washington's Dumbarton Oaks Gardens, the Latin words arching gracefully over two gilded sheaths of symbolic wheat: "As you sow, so shall you reap."I first stumbled upon this intriguing entrance in 1977. Then a graduate student in art history at American University, I held a part-time job in Georgetown and often trekked through the neighborhoods that were on either side of the commercial bustle of Wisconsin Avenue, admiring the riches in Federal architecture.
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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Paul Fuller Du Vivier, a retired career diplomat who was imprisoned by the Nazis during World War II, died of cancer Feb. 27 at home in Hunt Valley where he had lived since 1992. He was 82.Mr. Du Vivier was a reporter for the New York Times, then joined the Foreign Service in 1941. He retired in 1972.During World War II, while vice consul in Marseille, France, Mr. Du Vivier was active with the French Resistance, which led to his arrest by the Nazis.He and eight other prisoners, including diplomats, reporters and a Russian dancer, were imprisoned for 500 days at Baden-Baden in southwestern Germany.
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By Caroline Seebohm | June 21, 1991
THE visitor to America's suburban gardens during this year's blooming season might notice a disturbing phenomenon.Many of these back yards seem colorful, but isn't there something oddly similar about their colors?Isn't it strange that in garden after garden the rows of peonies always include three identical colors -- white, pink and dark red?Isn't it odd that along the driveways and rockeries, clumps of similar pink, mauve and white creeping phlox are in flower?Do our eyes deceive us, or is that rather dull pink rose growing in hedge-like profusion exactly the same rather dull pink rose planted in an identical row along almost every fence in the neighborhood?
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