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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter | July 19, 2007
Duke University's engineering dean will be the first female provost at the Johns Hopkins University, officials announced yesterday. Kristina M. Johnson, 50, who has been a dean at Duke in Durham, N.C., since 1999, replaces Steven Knapp as chief academic officer of the private Baltimore university. After more than a decade as Hopkins provost, Knapp will become president of the George Washington University in August. Johnson, an electrical engineer, will take office Sept. 1, officials said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Rev. Dr. L. Carroll Yingling Jr., a retired United Methodist Church minister and former superintendent of the Baltimore Northwest District, died of cancer Aug. 23 at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 87. "He had a lot of strengths, and he loved the people wherever he served and they returned that love," said the Rev. Lon B. Chesnutt, a longtime friend who retired in 1999 from Hiss Memorial United Methodist Church in Parkville, where he had been pastor for many years.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 1993
DURHAM, N.C. -- Five years ago, in an effort to diversify its faculty, Duke University approved a simple and direct policy. By the fall of 1993, it said, each department must have added an additional black faculty member.Now, after its 56 departments have shown a net gain of only eight black members, Duke is the focus of a very public fracas over hiring and promotion that has come to sum up the racial issues buffeting academia and many of the broader dilemmas involved in minority hiring initiatives nationwide.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Harold H. Hogg, founder of a Central Maryland and Southern Pennsylvania commercial construction company who endowed the Hogg Family Chair at Duke University, his alma mater, died June 3 of leukemia at the Moorings Park retirement community in Naples, Fla. The former York, Pa., resident was 86. The son of Dr. William L. Hogg, a United Methodist minister, and Mildred R. Hogg, a Latin teacher, Harold Hubert Hogg was born and raised in Leechburg, Pa....
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2000
Coventry Health Care Inc. announced yesterday that it will acquire WellPath Community Health Plans, the managed care subsidiary of Duke University Health System, for approximately $25.5 million. WellPath has 152,000 members and annual premiums of $230 million. Bethesda-based Coventry serves more than 50 counties in North and South Carolina, with concentrations in Charlotte, Greensboro and Raleigh-Durham, home of Duke University. Coventry expects to retain 130,000 of WellPath's current members, bringing its subscribers in North Carolina to 170,000.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2000
DURHAM, N.C. -- Few regard death as a good thing, but is there such a thing as a "good death"? Duke University believes there is and that each of us is entitled to one. Toward that end, the school has opened a $13.5 million research center devoted to the care of terminally ill patients and their families. The existence of the institute is an emphatic assertion that the end of life need not be a choice between a lingering, painful death and a Kevorkian-style assisted suicide. There is a third option, a death carefully controlled to minimize pain while allowing the patient opportunities to come to terms with the end of life.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
To appreciate just how much tennis means to Shantha Chandra, you need to hear the resident of Columbia's River Hill village tell about the day she delivered her third daughter. First, she played singles. She won the only set she played, 6-1. Then she went to the hospital for the birth of Anita, now a Johns Hopkins University doctoral candidate. "I told my doctor I had a 9:30 match with friends and that I wanted to play it," Chandra said last week, recalling that day in Durham, N.C. "I thought there would be time, and I said that if anything happened, I would be right outside the [Duke University]
NEWS
By JEFF BARKER AND ROBERT LITTLE and JEFF BARKER AND ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTERS | April 19, 2006
DURHAM, N.C. -- The arrests yesterday of two Duke University men's lacrosse players in an alleged rape that has enveloped this town left residents hopeful that the developments might defuse one of the case's more volatile elements - racial strain. Regardless of whether Reade William Seligmann and Collin Finnerty are found to be guilty or innocent, some community leaders said the images of the two young, preppy white men in handcuffs might do more to dampen the simmering racial tension than all the rallies and prayer vigils that preceded the arrests.
NEWS
August 12, 2007
Elizabeth Colerick "Jody" Clipp, a nationally recognized researcher on care for the terminally ill, died Aug. 5 of pancreatic cancer at her Chapel Hill, N.C., home She was 57. Born Elizabeth Colerick in Charlotte, N.C., she was raised in Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J., and in Timonium, where she graduated from Dulaney High School. She earned bachelor's and master's degrees in nursing at the University of Maryland. She worked as an emergency room nurse for eight years at the University of Maryland Medical Center before leaving in 1980 for Cornell University, where she earned a doctorate in psychology.
NEWS
November 15, 2004
On November 12, 2004, MILDRED "Millie" (nee Clusman); a native Baltimorean, dear daughter of the late J. Henry and Susan Clusman and recent resident of Blakehurst in Towson; loving mother of Nancy Van Gulick, Russ Phillips and the late Roger Phillips; devoted grandmother of Suzanna Baum, Katy, Hank, Bay, Bobby and Holly Mil Phillips; great-grandmother of Niramaya Baum. Millie, a graduate of Duke University, Class of 1942, a member of the Kappa Delta Sorority and sang in the Chapel Choir.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Nolan H. Rogers, a former Duke University lacrosse star who later became a Maryland assistant attorney general and the official tour guide and historian for Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died May 2 of complications from cancer at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 82. "Obviously, Nolan was present at the creation of the Camden Yards project, for which he did all of the land acquisition. He played a very important role in the development of the project," said Michael J. Frenz executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Maryland regulators are weighing some of the strictest limits in the country on shale gas drilling, but a scientist Monday suggested they still may not go far enough to protect drinking water wells from contamination by methane leaking from drilling sites. Gas drilling rigs would generally have to be at least 2,000 feet from public or private water wells under rules being considered by the Maryland Department of the Environment, officials said Monday during a meeting of the governor's advisory commission on the issue.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
Thank you for your editorial comments about Maryland women's basketball and their incomparable star, Alyssa Thomas ( "Remember her name," April 1). I know her and have seen nearly all of her home games. You ask the question about why Ms. Thomas is not better known, and I suggest you look to your own sports section for the answer. The Sun seems to have no problem giving heavy coverage to the mediocre Maryland men's program but can't be bothered to cover the women's team directly.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Dr. Howard F. Raskin, former chief of the gastroenterology department at Maryland General Hospital, died Sept. 17 at Duke University Hospital during surgery to replace a heart valve. The longtime Owings Mills resident was 87. "Howard was one of the smartest men I ever knew at the University of Maryland Hospital. He was top-drawer and had the manner of a gentleman," said Dr. Jason Max Masters, who retired in 1990 from the hospital, where he had been director of medical technology.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Dr. Walter E. Dandy Jr., a retired Baltimore anesthesiologist who helped establish the intensive care unit at Union Memorial Hospital and later served as its medical director, died July 11 of pneumonia at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 87. "Walter was a very capable and dedicated doctor who was a respected leader in the field of anesthesiology and intensive care," said Dr. William F. Fritz, a retired Baltimore internist and longtime friend. "And when he was in the intensive care unit, he was all business, and he really knew his stuff," said Dr. Fritz.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
As they enter the 61st and final year of their partnership, Maryland and the Atlantic Coast Conference are like a newly divorced couple that is forced by circumstances to continue to live together and makes a halfhearted pledge to remain friends. The conference and the university, which enters the Big Ten on July 1, 2014, have publicly committed to being cordial. But beneath the veneer lie bruised feelings and a pronounced disagreement about money - Maryland has challenged the legality of the $52 million exit fee - that can't help but color the relationship.
NEWS
June 5, 2003
On May 22, 2003, ROBERT BRUCE WARD, born 1917, of Marco Island, FL. He attended Boys Latin School and held degrees from Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. During WWII, he served as a naval aviator in the South Pacific Theatre. Following the war he worked in the engineering departments of Republic Aviation and Grumman Aerospace Corp. Later he was Prfessor Emeritus at Miami Dade Community College. Among his publications are a book on Emily Dickinson's poetry and a book on science, technology and human values.
FEATURES
October 13, 1991
Rosemary Okoye, a senior at the Catholic High School of Baltimore, was a participant in the Summer at Notre DameAcademic and Leadership Skills program, which included five weeks of classes and three weeks of an internship.*Dr. Gregory N. Derry, assistant professor of physics at Loyola College, has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation.*Duke University has awarded an Angier B. Duke Scholarship to Michael C. Ciarlo, a student at Boys' Latin School. The scholarship will pay for undergraduate tuition for four years and a summer semester at Oxford University.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Expectations are high for this year's commencement speakers at Maryland universities - an august crew that includes the Obamas and their team of writers as well as funnyman Bill Cosby and Hollywood director Jason Winer. But to stand out - or simply be remembered - isn't a guarantee, no matter how high the profile of the speaker. "The commencement speaker has to perform. He or she has the responsibility to inspire both students and graduates to make something of their lives" without falling back on cliches, said Steven D. Cohen, managing director of the oral communication program at the University of Maryland.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
As a result of losing, 18-11, to No. 8 Ohio State in the semifinal round of the Eastern College Athletic Conference tournament last Thursday night, No. 5 Loyola had no choice but to sit back and wait for the NCAA selection committee to decide the team's postseason fate. The reigning national champion (11-4) got the good news it was seeking when it was pitted against No. 4 and seventh-seeded Duke (12-5) in Sunday's first round. It was a huge relief, according to coach Charley Toomey.
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