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NEWS
May 29, 1996
A homeless man was robbed of his duffel bag by three or four men outside a Glen Burnie bakery Sunday night, county police said.Bruce William Langley, 23, of no fixed address, told police he was sitting on a bench outside the Dunkin Doughnuts store in the 7100 block of Ritchie Highway about 11: 55 p.m.When he closed his eyes and placed his head on his duffel bag, the victim said, he was attacked by three or four men who clubbed him with a stick and took...
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
A suspicious package reported in a clothing store in Annapolis Mall Thursday afternoon caused the store to be evacuated for about an hour while a bomb squad responded, Anne Arundel County police said. An investigation found that the duffel bags in question contained only personal belongings, according to Lt. T.J. Smith, a police spokesman. "Some bags were stacked up that looked suspicious, and they took all precautions" to make sure the area was safe, Smith said. The package was reported in Nordstrom just after 4 p.m., and police announced the incident was over just before 5 p.m. cmcampbell@baltsun.com twitter.com/cmcampbell6
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NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 1999
GENTLY USED suitcases or large duffel bags are needed for foster children, and Helpful Hands is collecting them. The group also is collecting donations for toiletries, such as hair brushes and deodorant, to be packed inside the suitcases. Helpful Hands is made up of four students from North Carroll Middle School who generate projects to assist needy children. Led by Jamie Ridgely, the members are Sarah Schultz and sisters Julie and Suzanne Jugo. Three of the girls are 13; Suzanne is 12. They frequently tackle large projects.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2008
For years, William Rice amassed tools, barrels and other knickknacks and hand-me-downs from his grandfather and his great- grandfather. Relatives say he stockpiled many of his belongings, including clothes and paint cans, inside two rickety sheds outside his rural Harford County home. That's where a worker found, amid the stuff, a canvas duffel bag - with human bones and part of a skull. Yesterday, authorities said the bones were likely educational props, and they have all but ruled out foul play.
NEWS
By Madison Park | June 26, 2008
A duffel bag containing a skull and what are believed to be three human bones was found in a Jarrettsville chicken coop yesterday, according to the Harford County Sheriff's Office. The bones, found in the 1400 block of Rock Ridge Road, are to be taken to the medical examiner's office today, said Sgt. Dave Betz, Harford County Sheriff's Office spokesman. One of the bones contained markings of what appeared to be a stamp or writing, Betz said. Investigators are trying to determine whether the bones were used in an educational setting or whether a crime is involved.
NEWS
December 7, 1995
Police logHarper's Choice: 5900 block of Grand Banks Road: Officers responding to an alarm found a home's rear basement window broken about 6 a.m. Tuesday. Burglars had ransacked and searched through bedrooms and taken a pillowcase and a duffel bag to haul off jewelry, compact discs and Christmas gifts.Wilde Lake: 5200 block of W. Running Brook Road: Someone tried to steal a 1989 Chevrolet Caprice by tampering with its ignition between Saturday and Monday.
NEWS
By Assoiciated Press | May 16, 1991
TROY, Idaho (AP) -- A 20-pound bag of candy dropped fro an airplane during a class field trip missed its mark and struck a 12-year-old girl, knocking her unconscious, and then hit another girl.About 350 children were on the field trip at the Spring Valley Reservoir, east of Troy, when the accident happened. During lunch, a pilot was scheduled to drop the duffel bag full of candy in the parking lot alongside the reservoir. He missed by 100 yards, striking the girls.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes | December 23, 1990
Even the names of Coach handbags are classy: the "Court Bag," the "Avenue Bag," the "Plaza Bag." They've long been associated with a certain chic, substantial elegance.But this reputation for horsy high style isn't the whole story. Amongst the peerlessly crafted spectator bags and "Madison Satchels" can be found the "Light Hobo" and the "Duffel Drawstring" -- bags that reflect in style as well as name a looser sensibility.Debbie Blank, assistant manager at the Coach Store in the Gallery, says their customers run the gamut from college-age girls searching for a duffel to throw all their stuff in to customers who return to the same, classic style year after year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
Police raided 10 rowhouses in a West Baltimore neighborhood and one in Woodlawn yesterday morning in an attempt to break up a group of suspected marijuana dealers who investigators said targeted suburban users.Detectives said they seized more than 40 pounds of marijuana -- the bulk coming from a duffel bag found in one house -- $40,000 in cash, four sawed-off shotguns, five handguns and three cars.Sgt. Michael Caperoon, of the Western Police District's operations squad, said 15 people between ages 20 and 40 were arrested yesterday on drug distribution charges.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 21, 2003
A duffel bag left near a telephone pole snarled evening rush-hour traffic in downtown Baltimore yesterday as police evacuated the nearby Blaustein Building and shut down traffic near Charles and Fayette streets. City police received a report of a suspicious package about 4:15 p.m., said Officer Troy Harris, a police spokesman. The Blaustein Building in the first block of N. Charles St. was evacuated while the city bomb squad unit used a robotic device to determine whether the bag posed a threat.
NEWS
By Madison Park | June 26, 2008
A duffel bag containing a skull and what are believed to be three human bones was found in a Jarrettsville chicken coop yesterday, according to the Harford County Sheriff's Office. The bones, found in the 1400 block of Rock Ridge Road, are to be taken to the medical examiner's office today, said Sgt. Dave Betz, Harford County Sheriff's Office spokesman. One of the bones contained markings of what appeared to be a stamp or writing, Betz said. Investigators are trying to determine whether the bones were used in an educational setting or whether a crime is involved.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | April 28, 2007
Henry J. Roth cheated fate in 1944 when severely swollen feet earned him a coveted seat on a train to an English hospital, weeks before his Army division was pounded by advancing Germans in the Battle of the Bulge. Sixty-three years later, a faded relic from his foxhole arrived at Roth's home in Catonsville. Roth, an 85-year-old retired accountant, received the package this week from Belgium. As his mailman and wife looked on, Roth opened the box and pulled out a dark green canvas duffel bag, emblazoned with stenciled lettering: "Henry J. Roth 33383648" It didn't take long for Roth to recognize the bag. It had once contained some of his Army gear and a picture of his wife.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
She was used to keeping secrets. As a young teenager, her lawyers said, she kept quiet about her mother's boyfriend sexually abusing her. As a college basketball player, she concealed her pregnancy. And when she gave birth in the bathroom of their dorm room, she hid the baby's body in a garbage bag, then deposited it in a storm drain near her father's home. Yesterday, some of 22-year-old Danielle Eboni Riley's secrets were discussed in a Baltimore County courtroom. Judge Vicki J. Ballou-Watts listened to details of the young woman's turbulent life, then sentenced the former Villa Julie College student to 20 years in prison for the murder of her newborn daughter.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
The mayor who decries homeland security grants as "woefully underfunded" spent $23,572 in grant money on embroidered polo shirts, fleece pullovers, Nantucket caps and duffel bags. It can all be justified, said Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley, but had he reviewed the spending beforehand he would have vetoed the purchases. "I think we probably could have accomplished the same thing with T-shirts. ... I would certainly vote for that in the future rather than something that would call into question our expenditure of these dollars," said O'Malley, a frequent critic of federal grant formulas that send homeland security money to unlikely terrorist targets, including rural areas.
NEWS
By Sarah Park and Sarah Park,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2004
SAN MIGUEL, El Salvador - On Thursdays, she brings out the knife. The dull steak blade is part of an unimpressive array of tools - nose, fingers, plastic tub, afternoon sun - that Angela Maritza Carballo uses to detect contraband in packages being sent to the United States from this smallest of Central American countries. She is the sole inspector for Umana Express, one of hundreds of mom-and-pop courier services that have linked families in El Salvador and the United States for more than 20 years.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 21, 2003
A duffel bag left near a telephone pole snarled evening rush-hour traffic in downtown Baltimore yesterday as police evacuated the nearby Blaustein Building and shut down traffic near Charles and Fayette streets. City police received a report of a suspicious package about 4:15 p.m., said Officer Troy Harris, a police spokesman. The Blaustein Building in the first block of N. Charles St. was evacuated while the city bomb squad unit used a robotic device to determine whether the bag posed a threat.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
The mayor who decries homeland security grants as "woefully underfunded" spent $23,572 in grant money on embroidered polo shirts, fleece pullovers, Nantucket caps and duffel bags. It can all be justified, said Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley, but had he reviewed the spending beforehand he would have vetoed the purchases. "I think we probably could have accomplished the same thing with T-shirts. ... I would certainly vote for that in the future rather than something that would call into question our expenditure of these dollars," said O'Malley, a frequent critic of federal grant formulas that send homeland security money to unlikely terrorist targets, including rural areas.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | September 19, 1994
Baltimore CitySHOOTING: Western District -- A 33-year-old man was walking in the 1200 block of N. Carey St. Sunday when a man shot him three times in the back. The victim was listed in critical condition at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.THEFT: Northern District -- Someone entered a 1982 Chevrolet while the vehicle was parked in the 500 block of E. 25th St. over the weekend and stole tools valued at $200.ROBBERY: Northern District -- A man entered Maria's restaurant in the 5500 block of York Road Sunday and took more than $100 from the pockets of an employee.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
In a Spy Kids-style scheme involving a circular saw, a getaway van and the disarming of motion detectors, seven teen-age boys tried to steal more than $100,000 in electronics from Old Mill Senior High School early Sunday, police said. Officers arrested five 16- year-olds and one 15-year-old, all of whom are students at Old Mill. A seventh suspect, also 16 and an Old Mill student, has been identified, said Officer Charles Ravenell, a police spokesman. The burglary attempt, which targeted science classrooms and had been planned for at least a month, according to police, was foiled when an officer who had arrived at the school about 3 a.m. to check out an alarm spotted a teen-ager walking away with a large, white duffel bag. Because the suspects are juveniles, police did not identify them, saying only that they are residents of Odenton, Millersville, Glen Burnie, Severn and Crownsville.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2001
If you work downtown, you have seen her. She sits on the east side of the Battle Monument most every weekday, her legs in their white ankle socks and black sneakers dangling perilously close to the traffic that hurtles by. Chances are, she hasn't spoken to you. She speaks to almost no one. Always, when you see her, she is writing. On first glance, perhaps you thought she was a lawyer. She has a decent overcoat, after all, and a cart that could be used for hauling legal papers back and forth between courthouses.
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