Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDue Process
IN THE NEWS

Due Process

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | December 13, 2006
Because Deloris McNeil missed paying a $96-a-year ground rent bill, she lost the Fayette Street house she had bought for $44,500 and lived in for years. The tiny, delinquent bill morphed into creditor-seizure powers that trumped fair play, common sense and fundamental rights. Such abuses, described in The Sun' s series this week on ground rent, pass every test for requiring legislative action. Property seizures by lenders and landlords are sometimes necessary, but I do not exaggerate by saying the rules for ground rent delinquency are medieval.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2014
At least five undocumented immigrants U.S. officials recently deported back to their homes in Honduras turned up dead at the morgue in San Pedro Sula, the Los Angeles Times reported . According to other news accounts, the victims ranged in age from 12 to 18, and all five had died of gunshot wounds. The director of the morgue speculated the killings were the work of criminal gangs in retribution for the children's refusal to become members or pay protection money to the thugs who terrorized their neighborhood.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
Lester Clay, the Wilde Lake boys basketball coach whose martinet style of coaching often frustrated and infuriated his players and their parents, will not return for the 2000-2001 season. But he might not be leaving without a fight. Wilde Lake principal Roger Plunkett notified Clay in a letter dated Aug. 1 that Clay's basketball coaching contract was not being renewed. Clay contends that his due process was violated, citing county policy that such terminations must be made in writing within 60 days of the conclusion of the season.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore Immigration Court, facing an increase in the number of cases involving immigrant children who crossed the border illegally, is expediting reviews to more quickly decide whether the children should be deported, according to attorneys with clients before the court. The so-called "rocket docket," created in response to a directive last month from the Obama administration to fast-track the cases, has meant the children receive initial hearings within 21 days and in some cases are given a matter of weeks, instead of months, to find an attorney.
NEWS
May 13, 1996
BY THE TIME the Maryland State Board of Education rules on her appeal, Atholton High student Shannon Eierman will have missed her entire softball season. While the ruling will come too late for the 16-year-old to pick up a bat, it may ensure other students the right to something far more important -- due process.Shannon was one of seven students suspended after being caught with alcohol on a school ski trip last President's Day weekend. When adult chaperones entered the hotel room the students were in, Shannon was holding a beer.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1998
Lawyers for embattled state Sen. Larry Young mounted a last-minute, but apparently futile, appeal yesterday to delay tomorrow's vote on a resolution to expel him from the Senate.In a letter to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Young's lawyers charged that the West Baltimore legislator was not given a chance to confront or cross-examine the witnesses whotestified against him, as allowed under the state ethics law.Instead, said Young's attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, the legislature's ethics committee used an abbreviated process to meet a preimposed deadline.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2004
A graduate of Folly Quarter Middle School appealed his 45-day suspension in a rare public appeals hearing yesterday after he was accused by another student of providing vodka during a bus ride to school in the spring. Most student disciplinary appeals hearings are closed to the public under Maryland law, but a parent or guardian can request the proceedings to be open. In this case, the parents of Philip Ashtianie, who will be a freshman at River Hill High School, decided to waive their son's confidentiality because they have been frustrated by the school system, which they accuse of determining their son's guilt without due process.
NEWS
By Alan Friedman and Alan Friedman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2000
TBILISI, Georgia -- The pale afternoon light on the winter day had begun to fade as the small group of law students huddled in the conference room heated only by a portable kerosene stove. After attending classes at Tbilisi State University, they had come to work with an American lawyer who was teaching them basic courtroom skills and tactics. As if the lack of heat were not deterrent enough, the fading sunlight presented another problem: It was getting too dark to take notes. Winter demands on the aging power system force blackouts on much of the city during the day. The group needed to work by candlelight to finish the discussion about interviewing witnesses and presenting testimony at a trial.
NEWS
September 27, 2004
ONCE AGAIN, a federal judge has reminded the executive branch that due process is due all, including the prisoners held incommunicado for nearly three years in the U.S. brig at Guantanamo Bay. This time, there are signs that the idea will take. The administration last week agreed to release U.S. citizen Yaser Esam Hamdi, also held incommunicado but at the Consolidated Naval Brig in South Carolina, months after Supreme Court justices ruled that Mr. Hamdi could challenge his internment. He has never been charged with a crime, and Saudi Arabia, where he will be returning and where his family lives, says it doesn't plan to charge him with any. At Guantanamo, 35 Pakistani prisoners were released this month, but some 550 still sit after more than two years in custody, awaiting charges and hearings.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush said yesterday it would be in Kuwait's interest to grant fair trials to everyone, but voiced sympathy for the emirate's treatment of alleged collaborators given the brutality of Iraq's occupation.His comments came as the Bush administration did a same day about-face and said it was concerned about charges that Kuwaiti trials of accused Iraqi collaborators fell short of due process.The Bush administration's initial response defended the Kuwait military justice system used to try alleged collaborators.
NEWS
By Judith Miller | September 28, 2009
It's been a busy summer at the Guantanamo Bay detention center. The joint task force in charge of the 226 remaining detainees is spending about $440,000 to expand the recreation yards at Camp 6. At nearby Camp 4, which offers communal living for the most "compliant" captives, the soccer yard is being enlarged. At Camp 5, a maximum-security facility, a $73,000 classroom is under construction. In March, the task force added art classes to the thrice-weekly instruction it offers in Arabic, Pashtu and English, courtesy of the U.S. taxpayer.
NEWS
By Scott L. Silliman | May 17, 2009
Upon taking office, President Barack Obama immediately suspended the military commissions at Guantanamo Bay to give his administration time to determine the best system to try detainees suspected of terrorism and violations of the laws of war. Up until the suspension, the commissions, authorized by the Military Commissions Act of 2006, had been criticized both domestically and internationally for not protecting the rights of detainees and for being overly...
NEWS
By Susan Goering | May 27, 2007
In 1931, Elisabeth Gilman, daughter of the Johns Hopkins University's first president, hosted the founding meeting of the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, with national ACLU founder Roger Baldwin as her guest and keynote speaker. Ever since, the Maryland ACLU has been on a mission to breathe life into the Bill of Rights and the Maryland Declaration of Rights. As we celebrate 75 years of fighting in constitutional democracy's trenches, we are able to take away some valuable lessons.
NEWS
By Dionne L. Koller | March 29, 2007
For those who are concerned with government encroachment on the civil rights of its citizens, a recent news report about the government's collaboration with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) should give pause. The article in The Washington Post noted the benefits of the "unique" partnership between the anti-doping agency and the government whereby the USADA was able to sanction amateur athletes and ban them from competition with the indispensable aid of Uncle Sam. It featured quotes from anti-doping officials explaining that with the tools of government - such as wiretaps and documents seized as part of federal investigations - the agency can achieve results it could not on its own. As Don Catlin, director of UCLA's Olympic Analytical Laboratory, which assists the USADA, said of the government's involvement in anti-doping efforts: "It has clearly caused a revolution.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | December 13, 2006
Because Deloris McNeil missed paying a $96-a-year ground rent bill, she lost the Fayette Street house she had bought for $44,500 and lived in for years. The tiny, delinquent bill morphed into creditor-seizure powers that trumped fair play, common sense and fundamental rights. Such abuses, described in The Sun' s series this week on ground rent, pass every test for requiring legislative action. Property seizures by lenders and landlords are sometimes necessary, but I do not exaggerate by saying the rules for ground rent delinquency are medieval.
NEWS
April 24, 2006
Ed Davis, 89, the tough-talking former Los Angeles police chief who led the department during its shootout with the Symbionese Liberation Army and the arrest of Charles Manson, died Saturday of complications from pneumonia at a hospital in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Mr. Davis rose through the ranks of the Los Angeles Police Department from patrol officer to chief from 1969 to 1978. Under his watch as chief, crime in the city decreased by 1 percent, while it rose elsewhere. In 1972 Mr. Davis suggested reinstating the death penalty in California to punish airline hijackers.
NEWS
By Jan C. Greenburg and Jan C. Greenburg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2003
WASHINGTON - Handing the government greater power to detain legal immigrants, the Supreme Court narrowly ruled yesterday that legal immigrants convicted of crimes may be held without bail throughout the course of their deportation proceedings, even where they are not a danger to society or flight risk. By a 5-4 vote, the court ruled that a 1996 federal immigration law that provides for mandatory detention of legal immigrants facing deportation did not violate their constitutional rights.
NEWS
February 10, 2005
A SERIES OF terrorist attacks in 1974 led the British government to launch a crackdown employing police powers that were unseemly by what were then American standards of due process - but that pale next to the system the United States is constructing today. The Patriot Act, the incarceration without charge of such citizens as Jose Padilla and Yaser Hamdi, the secret roundups of illegal aliens - these make the British tactics look almost quaint by comparison. Nonetheless, 11 innocent people spent years in British prisons as a result of that earlier campaign against terror.
NEWS
September 27, 2004
ONCE AGAIN, a federal judge has reminded the executive branch that due process is due all, including the prisoners held incommunicado for nearly three years in the U.S. brig at Guantanamo Bay. This time, there are signs that the idea will take. The administration last week agreed to release U.S. citizen Yaser Esam Hamdi, also held incommunicado but at the Consolidated Naval Brig in South Carolina, months after Supreme Court justices ruled that Mr. Hamdi could challenge his internment. He has never been charged with a crime, and Saudi Arabia, where he will be returning and where his family lives, says it doesn't plan to charge him with any. At Guantanamo, 35 Pakistani prisoners were released this month, but some 550 still sit after more than two years in custody, awaiting charges and hearings.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.