Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDue Diligence
IN THE NEWS

Due Diligence

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 16, 2013
While the Republicans were certainly guilty of deficit spending, they at least fulfilled their due diligence during President George W. Bush's administration ("Get it done," Feb. 13). They submitted a budget in accordance with the law and the most basic government and business practices. At the beginning of 2009, President Obama and the Democrats held majorities in both houses of Congress. But now it's 2013 and the Democrats have yet to submit a budget. Why would they choose not to be held accountable to the American people?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 6, 2014
The state's decision to allow second-tier drivers' licenses to undocumented immigrants smacks of unfairness ( "Thousands of immigrants seek drivers licenses," Dec. 31). First, it is generally an unethical, unfair practice. Second, it is an insult to the thousands of Maryland citizens who were at one time illegals and did their due diligence to obtain a state-issued driver's license. Rules and laws are put in place to be adhered to, not to be molded and reshaped in the hands of politicians who have certain self-serving agendas pertaining to laws and mandates.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
About a year ago, Matt Venditto hired a builder to construct a house in Westminster. It wasn't long before buyer's remorse set in. In early June, Venditto purchased a lot from Green Builders Inc., which was expected to finish the four-bedroom house within six months. But, Venditto says, progress was slow and the builder difficult to reach. Then, late last year, Venditto started hearing from subcontractors that they hadn't been paid. By mid-March, a few subcontractors had filed lien notices, while others began calling Venditto to complain that they also hadn't been paid.
NEWS
December 25, 2013
I am glad that Gov. Martin O'Malley has announced that the Maryland health exchange is working ( "O'Malley says major health exchange problems are fixed," Dec. 15). Now what I need is another announcement from him saying that the application filed for my sister-in-law in assisted living has been completed after 10 weeks of trying. However, such an announcement is not possible because, after 31 cumulative hours waiting for or talking to nine Maryland Health Connection reps and three supervisors, three lost faxes, three MHC promised call backs that never happened and 62 website attempts to set up an account, sign in or access on-line information, the entire process is now stalled because, I'm informed, "the system hasn't linked all the information for final approval of the application.
NEWS
June 14, 2009
Brian D. Morris' resignation Saturday as deputy CEO of the Baltimore schools saves the city of the risk of having someone whose own finances are in shambles overseeing the management of a $1.1 billion system. Once The Sun's Robert Little, Melissa Harris and Liz Bowie reported Friday about the 15-year string of legal judgments against him, his bad debts and garnisheed wages, Mr. Morris faced mounting pressure from educational and civic leaders to step down before he even began the job. It only took him a day to bow to the obvious - his employment in the system, in any capacity, was untenable.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
Everybody makes mistakes The Baltimore City School System has been fantastically served by Dr. Andres Alonso as the CEO. He has brought intelligence, professionalism and determination; things have noticeably improved. Did he make a mistake with Mr. Morris? It appears so. Let's give Dr. Alonso the freedom to make a misstep. We all do at one time or another. Katie Riback, Baltimore School board deserves blame, too While I don't disagree that Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso should have done "due diligence" before hiring a deputy, it seems clear to me that the principal blame still falls upon the board that was complicit in the Brian Morris fiasco.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | February 27, 2007
DETROIT -- Magna International Inc., a Canadian auto supplier, is likely to make a bid for the Chrysler Group, adding another potential suitor for the Auburn Hills, Mich.-based unit of DaimlerChrysler AG, according to a research report issued yesterday. The Chrysler Group has been the subject of intense speculation since DaimlerChrysler said two weeks ago that all options are on the table. Magna, which assembles vehicles for Chrysler at an Austrian factory, would like to expand its role beyond that of a supplier and niche contract assembler, a report by KeyBanc Capital Markets says.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
I read Victoria Weiskopf's letter in The Sun with growing amusement ("Progress comes slow to a space-age town," Sept 25). One would be forgiven for assuming that Ms. Weiskopf and her significant other retired to Virginia's Eastern Shore because, after due diligence, they found the region's lifestyle to their liking. But this is, apparently, not the case. She bemoans the region's "obstacles to real social progress" and its lack of support for a "progressive culture. " In fact, so oppressive do they find their present (meaning not liberal)
NEWS
By Jim Anderson | August 22, 2002
WASHINGTON -- If you peel away at the Bush administration's policy toward Iraq, you eventually come to the reclusive vice president, Dick Cheney. He's not the only one there; you'll also find the ubiquitous, indefatigable Richard Perle, head of the Defense Advisory Council, and Paul Wolfowitz, the deputy defense secretary. But Mr. Cheney appears to be the intellectual center of gravity, the head salesman and the focus of the president's attention and respect. Among his credentials is that he was defense secretary during the 1991 Persian Gulf war against Iraq.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
Northrop Grumman Corp. has sweetened its offer to buy aerospace company and auto-parts maker TRW Inc., intensifying Northrop's hostile bid to merge its way to the top of the American defense industry. Northrop Grumman raised its per-share offer from $47 to $53, one week before TRW shareholders are scheduled to vote on the company's takeover bid. TRW officials, who have repeatedly called Northrop Grumman's initial offer too low, said they would respond "in due course" to the new offer, which was announced Sunday night.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
The frenzy of transactions that previewed this year's winter meetings gave way to a slow opening day Monday, and along with that, the Orioles resumed a methodical plan of improving their club for next season. The Orioles reopened talks with prospective free agents and possible trade partners during the winter meetings Monday, and executive vice president Dan Duquette remains confident he will return to Baltimore with a new acquisition. “We've had a lot of conversations,” Duquette said.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
I read Victoria Weiskopf's letter in The Sun with growing amusement ("Progress comes slow to a space-age town," Sept 25). One would be forgiven for assuming that Ms. Weiskopf and her significant other retired to Virginia's Eastern Shore because, after due diligence, they found the region's lifestyle to their liking. But this is, apparently, not the case. She bemoans the region's "obstacles to real social progress" and its lack of support for a "progressive culture. " In fact, so oppressive do they find their present (meaning not liberal)
NEWS
February 16, 2013
While the Republicans were certainly guilty of deficit spending, they at least fulfilled their due diligence during President George W. Bush's administration ("Get it done," Feb. 13). They submitted a budget in accordance with the law and the most basic government and business practices. At the beginning of 2009, President Obama and the Democrats held majorities in both houses of Congress. But now it's 2013 and the Democrats have yet to submit a budget. Why would they choose not to be held accountable to the American people?
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
The Baltimore City Council on Monday approved a new map for the city's enterprise zone that significantly realigns and diminishes its footprint, from 22,000 acres to 14,000 acres. The zone is designed to support investment in and improvement of impoverished sections by offering tax breaks to businesses in the areas. The state reimburses the city for half the lost tax revenue. The new map, created by the Baltimore Development Corp., eliminated residential areas but also cut out some business zones that have seen a change in fortune over the last decade, including Harbor East and Harbor Point.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
About a year ago, Matt Venditto hired a builder to construct a house in Westminster. It wasn't long before buyer's remorse set in. In early June, Venditto purchased a lot from Green Builders Inc., which was expected to finish the four-bedroom house within six months. But, Venditto says, progress was slow and the builder difficult to reach. Then, late last year, Venditto started hearing from subcontractors that they hadn't been paid. By mid-March, a few subcontractors had filed lien notices, while others began calling Venditto to complain that they also hadn't been paid.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
Everybody makes mistakes The Baltimore City School System has been fantastically served by Dr. Andres Alonso as the CEO. He has brought intelligence, professionalism and determination; things have noticeably improved. Did he make a mistake with Mr. Morris? It appears so. Let's give Dr. Alonso the freedom to make a misstep. We all do at one time or another. Katie Riback, Baltimore School board deserves blame, too While I don't disagree that Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso should have done "due diligence" before hiring a deputy, it seems clear to me that the principal blame still falls upon the board that was complicit in the Brian Morris fiasco.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2003
McCormick & Co. Inc. ended a dispute of more than two years yesterday by settling a claim that reduces the price it paid for Ducros, Europe's top spice producer, by $55 million. McCormick bought Paris-based Ducros, the world's second-largest spice company behind McCormick, in August 2000 for $379 million, the largest acquisition ever for the Sparks-based spice maker. The contract to acquire Ducros from parent company Eridania Beghin-Say gave McCormick the right to request a purchase price adjustment if it found inconsistencies in its due diligence.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 19, 2005
NEW YORK - Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc. didn't defraud Allegheny Energy Inc. four years ago when the financial services giant sold its energy-trading unit to the utility, and Merrill is owed $115 million from the transaction, a federal judge ruled yesterday. U.S. District Judge Harold Baer Jr. said in a written opinion that Merrill, the world's No. 2 securities firm by market value, didn't inflate revenue at its Global Energy Markets before selling the unit to Allegheny in 2001. "Allegheny collects nothing on its claims," Baer said.
NEWS
June 14, 2009
Brian D. Morris' resignation Saturday as deputy CEO of the Baltimore schools saves the city of the risk of having someone whose own finances are in shambles overseeing the management of a $1.1 billion system. Once The Sun's Robert Little, Melissa Harris and Liz Bowie reported Friday about the 15-year string of legal judgments against him, his bad debts and garnisheed wages, Mr. Morris faced mounting pressure from educational and civic leaders to step down before he even began the job. It only took him a day to bow to the obvious - his employment in the system, in any capacity, was untenable.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 30, 2008
One by one, the e-mails started popping up this week in very important inboxes at very big schools. At Southern California, at Florida, at Texas. At every university that belongs to a Bowl Championship Series conference, in fact. "Our new service is designed to assist clients who understand the consequences of relying on perfunctory certifications of high-profile prospects," it read. Huh? Here's the interpretation: Your school can't properly research a prospective student-athlete's background.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.