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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Your Midweek Madness provider is on vacation for a couple of weeks, but understands your need for periodic relief from the dreariness of life, hence this Beethoven-ized blast of a well-known march tune played by the ever so clever Dudley Moore.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Your Midweek Madness provider is on vacation for a couple of weeks, but understands your need for periodic relief from the dreariness of life, hence this Beethoven-ized blast of a well-known march tune played by the ever so clever Dudley Moore.
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By Winifred Walsh | January 3, 1992
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is kicking off the 1992 year with several musical celebrations at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, including a possible Martell Cordon Bleu Concert Series program featuring "The Art of Dudley Moore."The actor and pianist is tentatively scheduled to play a program of classical music and other compositions the evening of Feb. 23, according to Megan de Pencier of the BSO's public relations department.Among the pieces Mr. Moore is scheduled to play are a Mozart piano concerto and George Gershwin's "Rhapsody In Blue."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
To borrow from "A Hard Day's Night," Russell Brand is a mod, a rocker and a mocker. He's got an edgy version of elfin charm — if you can call a 6-foot-1 man elfin. Lately he's had a mocker's version of a Midas touch. He gave voice to the Easter Bunny's teenage heir in "Hop" — and the film ruled the box-office last weekend. The Russell Brand brand should get another boost Friday when he opens in his first star vehicle, "Arthur. " Credit goes to Jason Winer, his Pikesville-bred director.
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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1992
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is kicking off the 1992 season with several musical celebrations at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, including a possible Martell Cordon Bleu Concert Series program featuring "The Art of Dudley Moore."The actor and pianist is tentatively scheduled to play a program of classical music and other compositions on the evening of Feb. 23, according to Megan de Pencier of the BSO's public relations department.Among the pieces Moore is scheduled to execute are a Mozart piano concerto and George Gershwin's "Rhapsody In Blue."
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By SYLVIA BADGER | February 26, 1992
Dudley Moore was a "10" last Sunday evening. His performance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was sensational.And the chemistry was evident between Moore and the BSO's talented maestro, David Zinman, who asked Moore: "What was Bo Derek really like?" "Well, (a pause) very dedicated to her husband. While we were rolling around in the surf, all she did was laugh!"Moore was in town as the guest artist with the 1992 Martell Cordon Bleu Concert Series. Baltimore was the first of four Martell concerts that Moore will do this year.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 20, 1992
VLADIMIR HOROWITZ once said there were three kinds of pianists: Jewish pianists, homosexual pianists and bad pianists."He forgot a fourth kind -- very short pianists," Dudley Moore says.Moore should know. He's very short (5-foot-2) and he's very good. Long before the British-born comedian became famous as a movie actor ("Bedazzled," "10" and "Arthur"), he was a successful professional musician. Aficionados considered him one of the most promising jazz pianists in Europe in the late '50s and early '60s.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 28, 2002
Dudley Moore made the insufferable endearing. And for a while, that made him one of the most popular actors in Hollywood. Moore, who died at his New Jersey home yesterday at 66 of pneumonia after a long bout with supranuclear palsy, hardly looked the part of a movie star. A stout little man with round features and a mop of curly brown hair, Moore looked the part of a British comic, which is exactly how he started. But beginning with a scene-stealing role as a lovestruck orchestra conductor in Foul Play (1978)
NEWS
By Harriet Ryan and Harriet Ryan,Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2008
LOS ANGELES - Prosecutors at Phil Spector's murder retrial have said repeatedly that certain circumstances - a late night, too much alcohol, a woman who didn't want him - made the legendary music producer reach for a gun. In court yesterday, his defense presented another: being mistaken for the actor Dudley Moore. Cross-examining a witness who claims Spector pistol-whipped her when they were dating, a defense lawyer raised another incident: a confrontation outside a New York club. The witness, Dorothy Melvin, told jurors that a group of young men approached the music icon as he got out of a limousine and asked to shake his hand.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 16, 1993
Didn't he used to be Dudley Moore?That's the question some viewers might ask about the short guy with the British accent in "Dudley," which premieres at 8:30 tonight on WBAL (Channel 11).The unfortunate answer is that the star of this new CBS sitcom is, indeed, Dudley Moore, and he has come to this.Watching Moore sleepwalk through this brain-dead, father-knows-nothing role of Dudley Bristol, some viewers not familiar with Moore's early career might find it hard to believe that he was once a great comic talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
If Baltimore had a pop-culture Mount Rushmore, Barry Levinson, John Waters and David Simon would be on it. In a few months, it might be time to start clearing room for one more filmmaker. On April 8, Pikesville-bred TV comedy whiz Jason Winer makes his big-screen debut with a star-studded production of a beloved old movie: "Arthur. " The trade journal Variety has already called him "One of the top ten directors to watch. " 2010 was a powerhouse year for Winer. He executive-produced the Emmy-winning ABC comedy "Modern Family" and directed every other episode in the first season.
NEWS
By Harriet Ryan and Harriet Ryan,Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2008
LOS ANGELES - Prosecutors at Phil Spector's murder retrial have said repeatedly that certain circumstances - a late night, too much alcohol, a woman who didn't want him - made the legendary music producer reach for a gun. In court yesterday, his defense presented another: being mistaken for the actor Dudley Moore. Cross-examining a witness who claims Spector pistol-whipped her when they were dating, a defense lawyer raised another incident: a confrontation outside a New York club. The witness, Dorothy Melvin, told jurors that a group of young men approached the music icon as he got out of a limousine and asked to shake his hand.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 28, 2002
Dudley Moore made the insufferable endearing. And for a while, that made him one of the most popular actors in Hollywood. Moore, who died at his New Jersey home yesterday at 66 of pneumonia after a long bout with supranuclear palsy, hardly looked the part of a movie star. A stout little man with round features and a mop of curly brown hair, Moore looked the part of a British comic, which is exactly how he started. But beginning with a scene-stealing role as a lovestruck orchestra conductor in Foul Play (1978)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 18, 1994
CBS says it's looking for younger viewers. But you'd never know it from the fall schedule the graying network announced yesterday, with new shows for such older stars as Dudley Moore, Della Reese, Hal Linden and Suzanne Pleshette.Furthermore, CBS renewed several series with the oldest audience profiles on TV -- Dick Van Dyke's "Diagnosis Murder," Angela Lansbury's "Murder She Wrote" and "Rescue 911."The biggest news yesterday from CBS might have been its cancellations. Burt Reynolds, Norman Lear and Tom Arnold all got the boot as the network canceled "Evening Shade," "704 Hauser" and "Tom."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 16, 1993
Didn't he used to be Dudley Moore?That's the question some viewers might ask about the short guy with the British accent in "Dudley," which premieres at 8:30 tonight on WBAL (Channel 11).The unfortunate answer is that the star of this new CBS sitcom is, indeed, Dudley Moore, and he has come to this.Watching Moore sleepwalk through this brain-dead, father-knows-nothing role of Dudley Bristol, some viewers not familiar with Moore's early career might find it hard to believe that he was once a great comic talent.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | February 26, 1992
Dudley Moore was a "10" last Sunday evening. His performance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was sensational.And the chemistry was evident between Moore and the BSO's talented maestro, David Zinman, who asked Moore: "What was Bo Derek really like?" "Well, (a pause) very dedicated to her husband. While we were rolling around in the surf, all she did was laugh!"Moore was in town as the guest artist with the 1992 Martell Cordon Bleu Concert Series. Baltimore was the first of four Martell concerts that Moore will do this year.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 21, 1991
Comedian Kevin Pollak makes a joke of his relative obscurity near the opening of a new edition of the "HBO Comedy Hour" tonight, but Baltimore viewers actually may recognize him right away.The funny comic played crazy cousin Izzy in "Avalon," filmmaker Barry Levinson's evocative 1990 ode to his own growing up years in Charm City. In fact, the film credit is mentioned briefly in "Kevin Pollak: Stop With the Kicking," premiering at 10:15 p.m. on the premium service.Like most of the "HBO Comedy Hour" installments, this one is a mix of Pollak's stand-up act (as taped at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts near San Francisco)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 18, 1994
CBS says it's looking for younger viewers. But you'd never know it from the fall schedule the graying network announced yesterday, with new shows for such older stars as Dudley Moore, Della Reese, Hal Linden and Suzanne Pleshette.Furthermore, CBS renewed several series with the oldest audience profiles on TV -- Dick Van Dyke's "Diagnosis Murder," Angela Lansbury's "Murder She Wrote" and "Rescue 911."The biggest news yesterday from CBS might have been its cancellations. Burt Reynolds, Norman Lear and Tom Arnold all got the boot as the network canceled "Evening Shade," "704 Hauser" and "Tom."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 20, 1992
VLADIMIR HOROWITZ once said there were three kinds of pianists: Jewish pianists, homosexual pianists and bad pianists."He forgot a fourth kind -- very short pianists," Dudley Moore says.Moore should know. He's very short (5-foot-2) and he's very good. Long before the British-born comedian became famous as a movie actor ("Bedazzled," "10" and "Arthur"), he was a successful professional musician. Aficionados considered him one of the most promising jazz pianists in Europe in the late '50s and early '60s.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1992
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is kicking off the 1992 season with several musical celebrations at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, including a possible Martell Cordon Bleu Concert Series program featuring "The Art of Dudley Moore."The actor and pianist is tentatively scheduled to play a program of classical music and other compositions on the evening of Feb. 23, according to Megan de Pencier of the BSO's public relations department.Among the pieces Moore is scheduled to execute are a Mozart piano concerto and George Gershwin's "Rhapsody In Blue."
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