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By JACQUES KELLY | September 23, 2000
MY PHONE has been going crazy this week with word that the duckpin bowling alleys at Southway Bowling Center in South Baltimore will close the middle of next month. Its space will be taken by upscale apartments. There's so much noise being made you would think the Cross Street Market was on fire. I can see why. The Southway, where my father learned to bowl, is a Baltimore classic, one flight up over what used to be the Henry Wessel dry goods store and is today a CVS. You enter the lanes at the corner of South Charles and Hamburg streets, the heart of the Federal Hill shopping district.
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SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | July 15, 2010
Right wing Brian Willsie has signed a free-agent contract with the Washington Capitals. The one-year deal brings Willsie back to the Capitals, for whom he scored a career-high 19 goals and added 22 assists in 2005-06. Willsie, 32, has 52 goals and 56 assists in 380 career NHL games for the Colorado Avalanche, Capitals and Los Angeles Kings. All-Star Game: The game earned its lowest-ever television rating. The National League's 3-1 victory Tuesday night on Fox earned a 7.5 fast national rating and 13 share.
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NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,Special to The Sun | January 3, 2007
It's Saturday night at the Glen Burnie Bowling Center, and Ed Craver has warmed up his cowbell. Standing at a table behind lane 23, he cheered on his teammates in the Saturday Night Fever duckpin league. He cheered, yelled directions to the ball such as "Go. Go!" and "Get there. Get there!" or just rung his cowbell. "I don't bowl to win or lose," Craver said. "I bowl to have fun and to have a good time. I like the people I bowl with."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | September 8, 2009
Leroy M. "Lee" Wooden, a financial supervisor who worked for the City of Baltimore and was a Vietnam War veteran, died of cancer Aug. 29 at his Parkville home. He was 58. Born in Baltimore and raised in Cedonia, he was a 1969 graduate of Northern High School, where he played football. He enlisted in the Army and served in Vietnam from 1969 to 1972. He was later active in the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He also held veterans' posts at the city War Memorial. After working with his late mother, Ruth Wooden, in their carpet-cleaning business, he joined city government and was a financial supervisor in the Department of Housing and Community Development for 20 years.
NEWS
By Staff Report | October 24, 1993
A duckpin bowling alley in Glen Burnie near Crain Highway and Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard that was destroyed in a five-alarm fire Friday afternoon was torn down yesterday. Fire officials estimated damage at $3.5 million.Battalion Chief Gary Sheckells, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Fire Department, said that the cause of the blaze at the Greenway Bowling Center was still not known.He said the fire began in a concealed open space behind the mechanical pin-setters on the second floor.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
Frank "Hank" Lanasa, the men's 1957 city duckpin bowling champ and a retired Canton tugboat deckhand, died Monday of heart failure at Mercy Medical Center. He was 80 and lived on Henry Street in South Baltimore.He took The Evening Sun's 1957 men's bowling trophy, Baltimore's top honor that he shared alongside the fabled Elizabeth "Toots" Barger, who was the women's winner that year."Lanasa, cool and poker faced, was confidence personified," The Evening Sun reported of his performance at the old Recreation Center lanes on Howard Street.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
Ruth Zentz, a 1940s champion duckpin bowler who went on to direct city girls' and women's amateur sports programs, died of congestive heart failure Aug. 4 at St. Agnes HealthCare. The Catonsville resident was 93. Miss Zentz won top women's honors in the 1944 Evening Sun tournament and was ranked among the top 10 female bowlers for the next decade. In 1951, she became the first Maryland woman to score above 200 in a recorded competition. Her 209 game set a women's national duckpin record.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | February 8, 1998
A VISIT TO the neighborhood bowling alley was as much a part of a week lived in Baltimore as a soda at Read's drug, the ordeal of shopping for new pants to wear to school, a ride on the No. 8 streetcar, or a $2 bet at Pimlico.Neighborhood duckpin lanes were scattered all over the area, often in basements or above shops. They tended to be one flight up or down. If a builder had some space left over, he installed hardwood maple lanes, gutters and automatic pinsetters, along with the inevitable snack bar and a cubicle for renting bowling shoes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
A sixth of the Baltimore area's remaining duckpin bowling alleys went out of business during the holiday weekend, and another is switching entirely to tenpin lanes -- ominous signs that the game with midget balls and pins is fading from its nativelandscape.Slated to shut down by todayare three alleys operated by AMF Bowling: the Joppa Center in the 1600 block of E. Joppa Road in Towson, Harford Center in the 6100 block of Harford Road in Northeast Baltimore, and Middlesex Center in the 1100 block of Eastern Blvd.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Edward F. "Slim" Wojnowski, who had been a local duckpin bowling champion during the 1950s and 1960s and was an active member of the Polish-American community, died Monday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 89. Mr. Wojnowski was born in Baltimore, the son of Polish immigrants, and was raised in Fells Point and near Patterson Park. He was a 1937 graduate of City College and attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. In 1941, he began working as a machinist apprentice at Rustless Iron and Steel Co. in East Baltimore, which later became Armco Steel Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Edward F. "Slim" Wojnowski, who had been a local duckpin bowling champion during the 1950s and 1960s and was an active member of the Polish-American community, died Monday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 89. Mr. Wojnowski was born in Baltimore, the son of Polish immigrants, and was raised in Fells Point and near Patterson Park. He was a 1937 graduate of City College and attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. In 1941, he began working as a machinist apprentice at Rustless Iron and Steel Co. in East Baltimore, which later became Armco Steel Corp.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2007
Washing the bowling balls was his Saturday morning ritual. Lance O'Hara was just 7 when he started hitting the lanes with a bucket of soapy water and a terry cloth rag, cleaning the oily grime off the house balls at Seidel's Bowling Center in Northeast Baltimore. His dad and a friend owned the place then, in 1967, when business at Seidel's was booming - its shiny red plastic booths packed with duckpin bowlers. In the late 1990s, with his dad getting older, O'Hara took over, managing to keep patrons with his fast talk and folksiness.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Special to The Sun | January 3, 2007
Duckpin bowling is up their alley It's Saturday night at Glen Burnie Bowling Center, and Ed Craver has warmed up his cowbell. Standing at a table behind Lane 23, he cheered on his teammates in the Saturday Night Fever duckpin league. He cheered, yelled directions to the ball such as "Go! Go!" and "Get there ... get there!" or just rang his cowbell. "I don't bowl to win or lose," Craver said. "I bowl to have fun and to have a good time. I like the people I bowl with."
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,Special to The Sun | January 3, 2007
It's Saturday night at the Glen Burnie Bowling Center, and Ed Craver has warmed up his cowbell. Standing at a table behind lane 23, he cheered on his teammates in the Saturday Night Fever duckpin league. He cheered, yelled directions to the ball such as "Go. Go!" and "Get there. Get there!" or just rung his cowbell. "I don't bowl to win or lose," Craver said. "I bowl to have fun and to have a good time. I like the people I bowl with."
NEWS
May 20, 2005
Frances V. Carroll, a retired longtime city public school educator, died of heart failure Sunday at the Reisterstown home of a daughter. The former Lutherville resident was 90. Frances Vanni was born in Baltimore, the daughter of Italian immigrant parents, and raised in Howard Park and on Liberty Heights Avenue. After graduating in 1932 from Forest Park High School, she worked for a Baltimore tailoring company with her father during the day, while studying business law at the University of Baltimore's evening school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,Sun Staff | May 8, 2005
When Mike Gibbons was looking to steal ideas for his new venue, Sports Legends at Camden Yards, he didn't visit only museums that celebrated athletics. Sure, he went to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., the basketball hall in Springfield, Mass., and the Kentucky Derby museum at Churchill Downs in Louisville. But he also drove down the Baltimore-Washington Parkway to study the Holocaust and Spy museums in Washington. He went to a number of Civil War museums. "Our goal is that we are trying to build America's top sports museum," Gibbons said, which meant finding ways to try to set it apart.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1996
Duckpin bowling and Oriole baseball are as Baltimore as it gets, coursing through the life of the city the way the Falls rushes into the harbor after a hard summer rain.But how many people know that it was a couple of Baltimore Orioles who invented duckpin bowling on Howard Street? Michael Gibbons does, and if the chief of the Babe Ruth Birthplace museum has his way, everyone who finds his or her way to Camden Yards will know it.Gibbons is a guiding force behind a $10 million baseball spectacular planned for 1998 at Camden Station, the now-empty former rail station from the Civil War era standing within spitting distance of Oriole Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
In yesterday's Live section, the byline was inadvertently left off the cover story about duckpin bowling. The article was by Sandra Crockett.The Sun regrets the error.It's a weeknight in Baltimore, and a cold wind is blowing as the temperatures dip below the freezing mark. It's only 8 p.m., but darkness has already descended, and a few hardy young people walk the streets. What's a person -- someone searching for some good, clean fun to break up the work week -- to do?Thousands of people in Maryland already know the answer to that question is found in nine-inch pins and a ball with no holes in it. Duckpins, that is. Duckpin bowling was invented in Baltimore, where it remains a popular sport with many fans.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 17, 2005
A one-time bastion of duckpin bowling and birthplace of the Fair Lanes bowling chain is poised to become Baltimore's next loft housing development. The old Recreation Bowling Center, a four-story building at 602-610 N. Howard St. that became Fair Lanes' flagship, was acquired this month by a group that intends to convert it to approximately 50 residences. The building was constructed in 1922 as a multistory bowling and dancing emporium, with 100 bowling lanes and a top-level ballroom and roller rink where big-name bands performed in the 1920s and 1930s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
Ruth Zentz, a 1940s champion duckpin bowler who went on to direct city girls' and women's amateur sports programs, died of congestive heart failure Aug. 4 at St. Agnes HealthCare. The Catonsville resident was 93. Miss Zentz won top women's honors in the 1944 Evening Sun tournament and was ranked among the top 10 female bowlers for the next decade. In 1951, she became the first Maryland woman to score above 200 in a recorded competition. Her 209 game set a women's national duckpin record.
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