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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2002
On busy Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard in Glen Burnie, where cars usually zip past signs for discount shrimp and oil changes, drivers are slowing down. What has transfixed them is the comeback of an old friend -- a small, plywood church with stained-glass windows and a steeple that stands again on its island in a little pond. In front is a sign: "Merry Christmas, Anne Arundel County, From the Gunther family." Glen Burnie's little church at the duck pond has returned, after more than a decade of decay and neglect.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Strollers and joggers are drawn to the duck pond, woods and gentle hills of Druid Ridge Cemetery in Pikesville, which for generations has served as a park. Neighbors say they've come to treasure this green patch amid the surrounding asphalt, stores and fast-food places, and they've been fighting in court to stop a real estate developer's plan to build houses along one border of the cemetery. The latest chapter in their effort to stop development on the nondenominational cemetery is expected to unfold in Maryland's highest court this spring.
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NEWS
By Peninsula Times Tribune | January 17, 1992
COLMA, Calif. -- Scattered among the imposing granite mausoleums and rows of tombstones, families share peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches, soda and potato chips.Children play hide-and-seek behind the polished headstones, laughing and darting between the reminders of lives long past. Over the hill, couples take a lazy canoe ride on the duck pond that graces one of the city's 13 cemeteries.It's a pleasant scene Ted Kirschner, longtime Colma city councilman, remembered with fondness. In his picturesque, northern Peninsula city, the dead outnumber the living by a 1,000-to-1 ratio, and residents have learned to live in harmony with their deceased neighbors.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 25, 2004
WHEN WORD got around the music community that the original Federal Duck was getting back together after 35 years, the reaction from serious rock fans was unanimous: "Why?" I should explain that the Federal Duck was the band I belonged to when I was a student at Haverford College back in the '60s. We were originally called the Stomp Jackson Quintet, and then the Guides (don't ask), but we came up with our new and final name one night when we were lying on the bank of the Haverford campus duck pond, and some ducks started waddling toward us in what looked like a purposeful manner, and as we watched them with increasing alarm -- an oncoming duck squadron in the moonlight -- the thought struck us that these ducks might be working for the government.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
This place is a zoo.It is a menagerie of feathers and fur, a roadside attraction that gives suburban kids a peek at barnyard life -- all within sight of White Marsh Mall. All in William "Billy" Comes' yard."It's really nice that he lets this be here for the children," said Virginia Santora. As her 15-month-old great-granddaughter, Brianna Stumpf, stared wide-eyed at a mother mallard and six ducklings, the Rosedale woman added: "If people hung around my house all day long, I don't know if I could stand that."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2011
Strollers and joggers are drawn to the duck pond, woods and gentle hills of Druid Ridge Cemetery in Pikesville, which for generations has served as a park. Neighbors say they've come to treasure this green patch amid the surrounding asphalt, stores and fast-food places, and they've been fighting in court to stop a real estate developer's plan to build houses along one border of the cemetery. The latest chapter in their effort to stop development on the nondenominational cemetery is expected to unfold in Maryland's highest court this spring.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 25, 2004
WHEN WORD got around the music community that the original Federal Duck was getting back together after 35 years, the reaction from serious rock fans was unanimous: "Why?" I should explain that the Federal Duck was the band I belonged to when I was a student at Haverford College back in the '60s. We were originally called the Stomp Jackson Quintet, and then the Guides (don't ask), but we came up with our new and final name one night when we were lying on the bank of the Haverford campus duck pond, and some ducks started waddling toward us in what looked like a purposeful manner, and as we watched them with increasing alarm -- an oncoming duck squadron in the moonlight -- the thought struck us that these ducks might be working for the government.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk | March 13, 1992
Families and students will be putting on the green today as St. JaneFrances School celebrates its 42nd annual St. Patrick's Day Bazaar from 9 am. to 2 p.m. and again from 5 to 10 p.m. in the school hall. Admission is free.Faithful attendees will notice a few changes in this year's event. Green is still the color but new games with new prizes, new menu items and a bigger payout on the "Winning of the Green" raffle will keep lucky lads and lassies busy as long as the foldinggreen holds out.For the young ones, there will be balloons, a duck pond, clowns, face painting and grab bags filled with goodies available during the day. After 5 p.m., the bazaar changes over to appeal to a more maturecrowd, but there is still a games room available for youngsters and teens to test their skills.
NEWS
May 17, 1994
ParklessYour editorial, "Doing Suburban Development Right" (May 12), mentions parks as part of this process. I am continually amazed at the development in Baltimore County that excludes community parks as part of the plan.In the Ryland development where I live, they leveled a forest to build 80 single family homes, hundreds of town-homes and dozens of condominiums. There is not one piece of land that does not have a home on it, except for two sediment control lots.Would it have discouraged them to build here if there was a county requirement that they set aside even one parcel of land for a community park?
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | May 28, 1993
Load your cameras with film, pack the fishing gear and the kids in the car and head to Downs Park for a fun, music-filled summer, says Ranger David DeVault.Officials at the 230-acre park off Mountain Road are planning a number of summerlong events, including a concert series and fishing contest, in addition to its organized hikes, turtle races and sand-castle contests.The county Department of Recreation and Parks kicked off its events May 15 with a photo contest that will continue until July 15, Mr. DeVault says.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2002
On busy Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard in Glen Burnie, where cars usually zip past signs for discount shrimp and oil changes, drivers are slowing down. What has transfixed them is the comeback of an old friend -- a small, plywood church with stained-glass windows and a steeple that stands again on its island in a little pond. In front is a sign: "Merry Christmas, Anne Arundel County, From the Gunther family." Glen Burnie's little church at the duck pond has returned, after more than a decade of decay and neglect.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
This place is a zoo.It is a menagerie of feathers and fur, a roadside attraction that gives suburban kids a peek at barnyard life -- all within sight of White Marsh Mall. All in William "Billy" Comes' yard."It's really nice that he lets this be here for the children," said Virginia Santora. As her 15-month-old great-granddaughter, Brianna Stumpf, stared wide-eyed at a mother mallard and six ducklings, the Rosedale woman added: "If people hung around my house all day long, I don't know if I could stand that."
NEWS
May 17, 1994
ParklessYour editorial, "Doing Suburban Development Right" (May 12), mentions parks as part of this process. I am continually amazed at the development in Baltimore County that excludes community parks as part of the plan.In the Ryland development where I live, they leveled a forest to build 80 single family homes, hundreds of town-homes and dozens of condominiums. There is not one piece of land that does not have a home on it, except for two sediment control lots.Would it have discouraged them to build here if there was a county requirement that they set aside even one parcel of land for a community park?
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk | March 13, 1992
Families and students will be putting on the green today as St. JaneFrances School celebrates its 42nd annual St. Patrick's Day Bazaar from 9 am. to 2 p.m. and again from 5 to 10 p.m. in the school hall. Admission is free.Faithful attendees will notice a few changes in this year's event. Green is still the color but new games with new prizes, new menu items and a bigger payout on the "Winning of the Green" raffle will keep lucky lads and lassies busy as long as the foldinggreen holds out.For the young ones, there will be balloons, a duck pond, clowns, face painting and grab bags filled with goodies available during the day. After 5 p.m., the bazaar changes over to appeal to a more maturecrowd, but there is still a games room available for youngsters and teens to test their skills.
NEWS
By Peninsula Times Tribune | January 17, 1992
COLMA, Calif. -- Scattered among the imposing granite mausoleums and rows of tombstones, families share peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches, soda and potato chips.Children play hide-and-seek behind the polished headstones, laughing and darting between the reminders of lives long past. Over the hill, couples take a lazy canoe ride on the duck pond that graces one of the city's 13 cemeteries.It's a pleasant scene Ted Kirschner, longtime Colma city councilman, remembered with fondness. In his picturesque, northern Peninsula city, the dead outnumber the living by a 1,000-to-1 ratio, and residents have learned to live in harmony with their deceased neighbors.
NEWS
June 15, 1993
Patterson Park is no stranger to skirmishes. It contained some of the fortifications that helped repel the British in the Battle of North Point in 1814. During the Civil War it was a military camp for Union soldiers.But even Patterson Park has seldom seen the kind of standoffs that are now being staged at its street corners. Twice a week after sunset, groups of residents and their dogs sweep through a 12-square-block area, shooing away prostitutes who are conducting business from the curbs.
NEWS
September 20, 1991
Next year will mark the 100th anniversary of the Pagoda, the 60-foot octagonal observatory tower standing near the highest point of Patterson Park. Fitting preparations are being made for the centennial: the whole neighborhood is pulling together to restore the landmark.Patterson Park is one of those urban oases that is taken for granted.Before air-conditioning, it was a place where whole families would spend the night on sweltering summer evening, hoping to catch some catnaps under the stars.
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