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Dubrovnik

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NEWS
February 27, 1994
With its walled city dating to the 8th century, Dubrovnik was so well-preserved it was placed on UNESCO's Register of World Cultural Heritage. Located on the Adriatic coast, it was also a popular tourist and vacation town. When Croatia declared independence, it touched off a war with the former Yugoslavia, now dominated by Serbia. Dubrovnik, in a corner of Croatia and near Bosnia (it is 87 miles due south of Sarajevo) was heavily shelled. City officials estimate damage at $2 billion and say 75 percent of industrial facilities were destroyed or damaged.
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EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
I love the knack Croatians have for taking a humble stretch of rocky shoreline and turning it into a wildly romantic bar or cafe. At Valentino Bar in the coastal town of Rovinj, the woman who runs the place hands out pillows as you arrive, an invitation to find your own nook in the rocks overlooking the bay. As the sunset fades and the flames on the old-time candelabra seem to brighten, you realize that you don't need to be rich to enjoy a luxurious moment...
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NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | November 5, 1991
If asked to name the most beautiful cities I have known, mostof my choices would be the obvious ones: Paris, Venice, Rome, Florence, Jerusalem, Istanbul, Copenhagen, Lisbon, San Francisco. But I would also include Dubrovnik.Yes, Dubrovnik, the ageless gem on the Dalmatian coast of Croatia, which has survived intact from assaults for more than 1,000 years, only to be pounded in 1991 by the artillery of its neighbor, Serbia. The legend is that earlier would-be conquerors were so enchanted by Dubrovnik's beauty that they were loath to disturb it. There is no such sensitivity on the part of the Serbs, whose shells are landing in the city as I write.
TRAVEL
By Mercury News | March 25, 2007
On a recent flight, a new digital camera was stolen from its box in my checked baggage ... with the box resealed and tucked in another suitcase. The airline claims it's not responsible. What recourse do I have? Although each airline limits its responsibility in its "contract of carriage" -- essentially the contract it makes with everyone who buys a ticket -- you can still try to recover the value of your camera. Checked bags are handled by airline baggage personnel and Transportation Security Administration screeners.
NEWS
By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1991
ABOARD THE FERRYBOAT SLAVIJA -- They crammed into the fume-filled car deck; they sat on suitcases and plastic bags. They retched in hallways and bathrooms.Three thousand refugees from the besieged Croatian port of Dubrovnik crowded onto the ferryboat Slavija -- built to hold 1,200 passengers -- fleeing the devastation wrought on their city by six weeks of siege and two weeks of heavy bombardment from land, sea and air by the federal Yugoslav People's Army.The trip was organized by the European Community to remove its cease-fire monitors from Dubrovnik after all efforts at ending the Yugoslav army's attack on the city ended in failure and their hotel was shelled by the federal forces.
NEWS
By E. Pendleton Banks | November 15, 1991
IN HER BOOK "Black Lamb and Grey Falcon," arguably one of the great books of this century, Rebecca West tells of visiting Dubrovnik and other cities along the Yugoslav coast and observing how life there is lived as a public drama.With ancient and graceful stone buildings as a background, incidents such as a sick woman being taken to the hospital or a loving reunion of family members take on the qualities of high drama. During 25 years of residence and travel in Yugoslavia, my family and I have had many occasions to confirm this and many other of West's observations.
NEWS
By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Special to the Sun | November 3, 1991
DUBROVNIK, Yugoslavia -- As a burst of machine gun fire rang out from a distant hilltop overlooking Dubrovnik, Marija Sambrailo stood in the door of her crystal and gift shop on the Stradun, the marble-paved main street of this medieval walled city.Since the Yugoslav federal army began besieging the Croatian town and its handful of defenders Oct. 1, Ms. Sambrailo has had few customers. She made her last sale, a hair band, 10 days ago.Still, she and the 50,000 other Dubrovnik residents who refuse to abandon their hometown do their best to maintain a sense of normalcy.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Air Force jet that carried Commerce Secretary Ron Brown through the clouds over Dubrovnik, Croatia, April 3 was flying to a catastrophe that had been months in the making but might have been avoided seconds before it smashed into a mountain, killing 35.The chain of causes began with erroneous Croatian landing guidelines and ended with a harried air crew, rushing fatally through its landing procedures, flying off course and almost 90...
TRAVEL
By Mercury News | March 25, 2007
On a recent flight, a new digital camera was stolen from its box in my checked baggage ... with the box resealed and tucked in another suitcase. The airline claims it's not responsible. What recourse do I have? Although each airline limits its responsibility in its "contract of carriage" -- essentially the contract it makes with everyone who buys a ticket -- you can still try to recover the value of your camera. Checked bags are handled by airline baggage personnel and Transportation Security Administration screeners.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Senior U.S. officials focused yesterday on the likelihood that a horrific storm and inadequate instruments forced a jet carrying Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown to veer off course Wednesday before crashing into a Croatian hillside, killing Mr. Brown and 34 others.In advance of a formal investigation, Peter Galbraith, the U.S. ambassador to Croatia, indicated that foul weather was one probable cause of the crash."The weather yesterday as the plane flew in was terrible," Mr. Galbraith said at a news conference televised from Dubrovnik.
TRAVEL
By ROBERT CROSS and ROBERT CROSS,CHICAGO TRIBUN | July 9, 2006
LAPAD, Croatia "These are all nice people. Everybody's nice in my group." Coming from the big, unsmiling Irene Demsar, our Slovenian tour guide, this sounded a little like a threat - or a warning. On a Saturday in May, the beginning of our nine-day, eight-night bus tour of Croatia's Dalmatian Coast and a bit of Slovenia, Demsar gathered us into a lounge at the Argosy, a no-nonsense, group-oriented hotel on a fantastically beautiful chunk of Adriatic shore. Through the magic of travel agencies and the Internet, 40 travelers from Canada, Australia and the United States ended up in that hotel lounge, where a gray-vested waiter served wine and Demsar told everybody what to expect.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Air Force jet that carried Commerce Secretary Ron Brown through the clouds over Dubrovnik, Croatia, April 3 was flying to a catastrophe that had been months in the making but might have been avoided seconds before it smashed into a mountain, killing 35.The chain of causes began with erroneous Croatian landing guidelines and ended with a harried air crew, rushing fatally through its landing procedures, flying off course and almost 90...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Senior U.S. officials focused yesterday on the likelihood that a horrific storm and inadequate instruments forced a jet carrying Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown to veer off course Wednesday before crashing into a Croatian hillside, killing Mr. Brown and 34 others.In advance of a formal investigation, Peter Galbraith, the U.S. ambassador to Croatia, indicated that foul weather was one probable cause of the crash."The weather yesterday as the plane flew in was terrible," Mr. Galbraith said at a news conference televised from Dubrovnik.
NEWS
August 14, 1995
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The Dubrovnik area came under artillery fire today as Croats tried to push Serb guns out of range of the medieval walled city on Croatia's coast.The Muslim-led Bosnian army was carrying out its own offensive in central Bosnia and appeared to meet stiff Serb resistance.As allied Croatian and Bosnian government troops moved to capitalize on recent gains over the Serbs, the United States and Russia were struggling to find new ways to end the war in Bosnia.U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1994
With its walled city dating to the 8th century, Dubrovnik was so well-preserved it was placed on UNESCO's Register of World Cultural Heritage. Located on the Adriatic coast, it was also a popular tourist and vacation town. When Croatia declared independence, it touched off a war with the former Yugoslavia, now dominated by Serbia. Dubrovnik, in a corner of Croatia and near Bosnia (it is 87 miles due south of Sarajevo) was heavily shelled. City officials estimate damage at $2 billion and say 75 percent of industrial facilities were destroyed or damaged.
NEWS
By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1991
ABOARD THE FERRYBOAT SLAVIJA -- They crammed into the fume-filled car deck; they sat on suitcases and plastic bags. They retched in hallways and bathrooms.Three thousand refugees from the besieged Croatian port of Dubrovnik crowded onto the ferryboat Slavija -- built to hold 1,200 passengers -- fleeing the devastation wrought on their city by six weeks of siege and two weeks of heavy bombardment from land, sea and air by the federal Yugoslav People's Army.The trip was organized by the European Community to remove its cease-fire monitors from Dubrovnik after all efforts at ending the Yugoslav army's attack on the city ended in failure and their hotel was shelled by the federal forces.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | November 5, 1991
Boston SUPPOSE THAT at this moment Venice were being shelled and bombed in a civil war, its treasured monuments menaced, its population starved. Would the Western world be silent? Of course not. It would react in outrage. It would intervene to stop such a crime against history and humanity.But across the Adriatic today another historic jewel of a city, Dubrovnik, is being bombed, its population strangled by blockade. Where are the world's protests? Where is any effective action to stop the crime?
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
I love the knack Croatians have for taking a humble stretch of rocky shoreline and turning it into a wildly romantic bar or cafe. At Valentino Bar in the coastal town of Rovinj, the woman who runs the place hands out pillows as you arrive, an invitation to find your own nook in the rocks overlooking the bay. As the sunset fades and the flames on the old-time candelabra seem to brighten, you realize that you don't need to be rich to enjoy a luxurious moment...
NEWS
By E. Pendleton Banks | November 15, 1991
IN HER BOOK "Black Lamb and Grey Falcon," arguably one of the great books of this century, Rebecca West tells of visiting Dubrovnik and other cities along the Yugoslav coast and observing how life there is lived as a public drama.With ancient and graceful stone buildings as a background, incidents such as a sick woman being taken to the hospital or a loving reunion of family members take on the qualities of high drama. During 25 years of residence and travel in Yugoslavia, my family and I have had many occasions to confirm this and many other of West's observations.
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | November 5, 1991
If asked to name the most beautiful cities I have known, mostof my choices would be the obvious ones: Paris, Venice, Rome, Florence, Jerusalem, Istanbul, Copenhagen, Lisbon, San Francisco. But I would also include Dubrovnik.Yes, Dubrovnik, the ageless gem on the Dalmatian coast of Croatia, which has survived intact from assaults for more than 1,000 years, only to be pounded in 1991 by the artillery of its neighbor, Serbia. The legend is that earlier would-be conquerors were so enchanted by Dubrovnik's beauty that they were loath to disturb it. There is no such sensitivity on the part of the Serbs, whose shells are landing in the city as I write.
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