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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 12, 2002
Samuel F. du Pont, descendant of the powerful industrialist and a former Cecil County sheriff, admitted yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that he failed to pay taxes on nearly $1 million he received from family trusts in the late 1990s. Du Pont, 72, of Cecilton pleaded guilty to two counts of tax evasion. Federal prosecutors said in court papers that du Pont failed to file tax returns from 1996 through 1999, during which he earned $982,809 as the sole beneficiary of three trusts.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
Patricia du Pont, founder of the Fair Hill Pony Club who was active in animal rescue work, died Feb. 16 of complications from a stroke at her home in Fairview, Cecil County. She was 94. The daughter of Archibald du Pont, who had been CEO of the Delaware Trust Bank, and Elizabeth Hayward du Pont, a homemaker, she was born and raised in Wilmington, Del. She was a graduate of St. Timothy's School. An accomplished horsewoman, show rider and avid fox hunter, Miss du Pont enjoyed fox hunting with the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club, and hunted with her own pack of foxhounds.
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TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2011
Online refer: For more garden photos, go to baltimoresun.com/travel. For more information on gardening, read Susan Reimer 's blog at baltimoresun.com/gardenvariety When Cheval Opp retired from IBM, she knew exactly what she would do with her time. Visit gardens. "My whole life at IBM, whenever they would send me anywhere, I would take an extra day or a weekend and visit gardens," she said. "When I realized I'd be retiring and I could do anything I wanted, I knew what it would be. " Now Opp helps travelers and day trippers arrange tours of the many public gardens in the Mid-Atlantic area.
TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2011
Online refer: For more garden photos, go to baltimoresun.com/travel. For more information on gardening, read Susan Reimer 's blog at baltimoresun.com/gardenvariety When Cheval Opp retired from IBM, she knew exactly what she would do with her time. Visit gardens. "My whole life at IBM, whenever they would send me anywhere, I would take an extra day or a weekend and visit gardens," she said. "When I realized I'd be retiring and I could do anything I wanted, I knew what it would be. " Now Opp helps travelers and day trippers arrange tours of the many public gardens in the Mid-Atlantic area.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
Patricia du Pont, founder of the Fair Hill Pony Club who was active in animal rescue work, died Feb. 16 from complications of a stroke at her home in Fairview, Cecil County. She was 94. The daughter of Archibald du Pont, who had been CEO of the Delaware Trust Bank, and Elizabeth Hayward du Pont, a homemaker, she was born and raised in Wilmington, Del. She was a graduate of St. Timothy's School. An accomplished horsewoman, show rider and avid fox hunter, Miss du Pont enjoyed fox hunting with the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club, and hunted with her own pack of foxhounds.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 24, 2008
Elizabeth "Betty" DuPont, a volunteer and former Lutherville resident, died of aortic stenosis Sunday at a nursing home in South Portland, Maine. She was 89. Elizabeth Lunt was born and raised in South Portland. After graduating from high school in 1936, she attended Northeastern Business College. After moving to Lutherville in 1959, Mrs. DuPont became an active member of Havenwood Presbyterian Church and was a former board member of the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. Mrs. DuPont was an enthusiastic cook and enjoyed entertaining family and friends.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | April 23, 1994
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Du Pont Co. said yesterday that it had agreed to settle 220 farmers' lawsuits involving the company's Benlate fungicide for a total of $214 million.The growers, from Florida, Hawaii and Costa Rica, had alleged that their crops were damaged by use of Benlate 50 DF from 1987 to 1991, said the farmers' attorney Kevin Malone of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.The growers were seeking a total of almost $1 billion for damage to their ornamental plants, tomatoes, watermelons and cucumbers, Du Pont spokeswoman Pat Getter said.
NEWS
February 15, 1991
Isabell Upton, a native of the Baltimore area who worked many years for the E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., died Friday at a nursing home in Akron, Pa., after a long illness.Graveside services for Mrs. Upton, who was 81 and had lived since 1989 in New Holland, Pa., were held Tuesday at the Friendship Cemetery at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.She retired in 1974 after making maps and charts for Du Pont for more than 20 years.The former Isabell Clark moved from the Baltimore area to Wilmington in 1946.
NEWS
November 24, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Albert B. Friel, a retired departmental director of employee relations for Du Pont in Wilmington, Del., will be offered at 11 a.m. Tuesday at St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church in Queenstown.Mr. Friel, who was 77 and lived in Chestertown and in Bath, Maine, died Thursday at Kent and Queen Anne's Hospital in Chestertown after a heart attack.He retired in 1977 from the chemical company, where he had worked in pigment and explosives manufacturing and, during World War II, served as manager of an explosives plant in Rosemount, Minn.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | December 28, 1991
Crop Genetics International of Hanover took a big step toward making itself a commercial biotechnology company yesterday when it announced a partnership with chemical giant Du Pont to develop and sell Crop Genetics' insecticides made from viruses retrieved from dead bugs.The deal calls for Wilmington, Del.-based Du Pont to pump $3.75 million into Crop Genetics over the next two years. Crop Genetics will work on researching and manufacturing new insecticides, while Du Pont will also do research and will handle the field testing and marketing of the products.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Spring brings renewal, and that was the feeling among some horsemen Wednesday, when the Maryland Jockey Club released a Pimlico spring stakes schedule that includes the return of the Grade III Allaire duPont Distaff on Preakness Day and a $100,000 boost to the purse for the day before's Grade II Black-Eyed Susan Stakes. The MJC unveiled the stakes schedule after reaching agreement with the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association and Maryland Horse Breeders Association. All that remains is for the Maryland Racing Commission to approve it Feb. 15 at its monthly meeting at Laurel Park.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The National Audubon Society has sold a 950-acre wildlife sanctuary it was given on the Eastern Shore to former Anne Arundel County executive Robert A. Pascal, who said Friday he plans to raise organic cattle and hay on part of it. Pascal and Audubon both declined to disclose the purchase price, though state assessment records valued the land and six homes there at $8.5 million. The waterfront estate near Bozman in Talbot County was once a hunting preserve for the DuPont family. It was donated to Audubon 13 years ago by Jean Ellen duPont Shehan to be a nature preserve and outdoor education center.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | March 17, 2010
The unveiling of the spring schedule at a meeting of the Maryland Racing Commission on Tuesday came with good news and bad, as the state's horse racing industry continues to struggle for financial stability. More than $2.4 million will be up for grabs in 18 stakes races during the spring meet at Pimlico Race Course, but the Grade I Pimlico Special, which dates to War Admiral's 1937 victory and for years has been the second-most important race in Maryland after the Grade I Preakness, will not be among the scheduled events.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Wilmington, Del. - The rich are different from the rest of us. They have better gardens. But if we are lucky, they let us visit those gardens, drinking in the serenity, marveling at the perfection. That is certainly the case with Nemours, the mansion and gardens created at the turn of the 20th century by Alfred I. duPont, the great-great-grandson of Pierre Samuel duPont, the French aristocrat who immigrated to this country and founded a family fortune by making gunpowder. Nemours, both the 47,000-square-foot mansion and the 220 acres of gardens, has just undergone a $39 million face-lift overseen by Sandra Parson Vicchio of the Baltimore architectural firm Ayers Saint Gross, which also designed the award-winning visitors center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 24, 2008
Elizabeth "Betty" DuPont, a volunteer and former Lutherville resident, died of aortic stenosis Sunday at a nursing home in South Portland, Maine. She was 89. Elizabeth Lunt was born and raised in South Portland. After graduating from high school in 1936, she attended Northeastern Business College. After moving to Lutherville in 1959, Mrs. DuPont became an active member of Havenwood Presbyterian Church and was a former board member of the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. Mrs. DuPont was an enthusiastic cook and enjoyed entertaining family and friends.
TRAVEL
By Virginia A. Smith and Virginia A. Smith,The Philadelphia Inquirer | October 7, 2007
WILMINGTON, Del. -- No sense putting on airs if you're the straightforward First State, and an itty bitty one, at that. When you have a home as fine as Nemours, built in 1910 by Alfred I. duPont, you don't pretend it's a "cottage," as they might in blue-blood Newport, R.I. It's a mansion. Set on 222 acres just north of Wilmington, Nemours has 77 rooms, seven ponds, a kids' playhouse the size of a large model home and enough gold leaf on the walls, ceilings and statuary to gild an entire line of death masks for King Tut. The French-style country estate, which typically gets 14,000 visitors a year, is in the middle of the first, and largest, phase of a restoration that could take another decade to complete.
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