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By Dolan Hubbard | December 26, 2003
TEACHER, AUTHOR, editor, scholar, Pan-Africanist and founding member of the NAACP, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, the first African-American to earn a doctorate from Harvard, is best known for The Souls of Black Folk, published 100 years ago this year. This slender volume of 14 essays quickly established itself as a keystone in 20th century thought. Both its title and language suggest the idea of a revelation, which is only partial. Mr. Du Bois hints of a deeper interpretation on "the strange meaning of being black" and on the promise of America at the dawn of the 20th century.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | December 13, 2013
The No. 15 Lake Clifton boys basketball team brought full-court pressure on W.E.B. DuBois in the first half and was rewarded with 15 turnovers. The Lakers built a 36-point halftime lead and cruised to a 76-43 win Thursday. Lake Clifton (2-0) was led by Elijah Kess and Montague Wright with 15 points each. The Panthers fell to 0-2. Girls basketball No. 9 Howard 58, Atholton 34: Jayda Gilmore scored a game-high 22 points to lead the host Lions (3-0) past the Raiders (1-2)
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NEWS
By Bruce A. Clayton | November 7, 1993
"The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color-line," W. E. B. Du Bois prophesied in 1903. The young black professor at Atlanta University was writing in "The Souls of Black Folk," a brilliant, lyrical but uncompromisingly bold cry of what it meant to be black in a white world. Here was a voice that the world -- and not just America -- had never heard before. From that moment on, black consciousness began to change.Two years later, Du Bois and a small band of black and white activists met in Niagara, Ontario, to talk and plot strategies for change.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 11, 2013
W.E.B. DuBois High School is the latest to win the Mayor's Attendance Campaign competition, after its ninth-grade class increasing its daily attendance by nearly 11 percentage points. The school was surprised with the honor--which includes a dance party staffed by a 92Q DJ at The Grille at Peerce's Landing--with a visit from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake city schools CEO Andres Alonso, and Jonathon Rondeau, of the Family League of Baltimore.  The ninth-grade class increased its daily attendance from 63.42 percent to 74.05 percent, according to a release.
NEWS
By Mike Adams | August 9, 1998
Ten years after W.E.B. Du Bois graduated from Fisk University, he returned to deliver the commencement address to the class of 1898. He spoke about the careers available to college-educated blacks and urged the class members to use their knowledge to enrich the black community. Du Bois' speech became the basis of the "talented tenth," his idea that a well-educated group of blacks - comprising 10 percent of the black population - could become the vehicle to pull the remaining 90 percent from the pit of racial oppression.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1997
At nearly 65, Dr. Du Bois Williams believes she has just started her life's true quest -- following in the spiritual footsteps of her grandfather, civil rights leader and scholar W.E.B. Du Bois.But this Du Bois expects to tackle modern issues that face some in the African-American community: teen-age pregnancy, low self-esteem, grief and lax parental involvement with children.At a Black History Month symposium yesterday that marked her grandfather's 129th birthday at the Cross Keys Inn, Williams outlined a dream of reaching out by using the tool held dearest by her family -- education.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
The life of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, the civil rights leader, scholar and one of the five founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, came to an end only hours before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech to a crowd of 241,000 marchers who had gathered at the Lincoln Memorial on a warm August afternoon in 1963. Before King spoke, Roy Wilkins, executive secretary of the NAACP, addressed the marchers who had earlier observed a moment of silence in Du Bois' memory at the Washington Monument.
NEWS
February 19, 2005
On February 17, 2005, MICHAEL A., of Pasadena, beloved husband of Janice L. Du Bois, passed away following a lengthy illness. In addition to his wife Jan he is survived by his parents Teresa and Raymond Du Bois of New Carrolton, parents-in-law, Benny and Doris Adkins, of Glen Burnie, sister-in-law Joyce Smith and husband David Smith of Milton, VT., brother Daniel Du Bois of Ellicott City and sister Renee Du Bois-Friel of Washington, D.C. He was preceded in...
NEWS
By Gerald Horne | February 23, 1997
MARYLAND HAS had the good fortune of being the home of two of the best of African-American leaders of the past two centuries. The example provided by Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Du Bois - most notably their global outlook - continues to provide instructive lessons for today.Douglass, born a slave, spent his early years in Maryland before moving on to Massachusetts and New York. Though a noted orator and writer, perhaps his major contribution to the struggle for freedom was his frequent trips abroad to rally support for the anti-slavery struggle here.
NEWS
August 11, 2004
On August 9, 2004, LEON, beloved husband of the late Betty Awner (nee Du Bois) and the late Shirlee Awner (nee Pollack); beloved brother of Pearl Satisky and the late Sylvia Fribush; also survived by many generations of loving nieces, loving nephews and dear friends. Services and Interment will be held at the Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, 3600 E. Baltimore Street on Wednesday, August 11 at 3 P.M. Please omit flowers, contributions, in his memory, may be directed to Save-A-Heart Foundation, 25 Cross Roads Drive, #30, Owings Mills, MD (21117)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
This soft, accessible rustic red blend comes from a widely distributed producer and carries an attractive price tag. This versatile wines boasts flavors of blackberry, black cherry, chocolate and spices. It's a wine meant for casual consumption and not built for long cellaring. It's medium- to full-bodied and very smooth. Nothing challenging, just a pleasure to drink. From: California Price: $12 Serve with: Pasta dishes, carne asada
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | January 21, 2012
Visiting No. 12 Roland Park built an early lead and held on to upset No. 7 St. Vincent Pallotti, 45-35, Friday. Daisy Alaeze and Beth Kelly each scored 14 points for the Reds (10-8), who led 24-13 at halftime. Tiffany Padgett scored 14 points and had 11 rebounds for the Panthers (11-6). No. 1 Aberdeen 70, Elkton 38: Bri Jones scored a game-high 24 points, and Nia Alleyne added 22 to power the host Eagles (13-0) past the Elks. No. 4 Spalding 56, No. 14 Seton Keough 41: The visiting Gators (9-9)
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | December 17, 2011
Last year's All-Metro Player of the Year, Aquille Carr, had 17 points and six assists as No. 1 Patterson beat W.E.B. DuBois, 76-38, Friday night. Shakir Brown added 15 points and 11 rebounds as the Clippers improved their record to 3-0. Jibri Frazier led the Panthers with 23. No. 2 Mount. St. Joseph 56, Loyola 34: Kameron Williams had 21 points as the Gaels moved to 9-0. Bennett Bradley scored 10 for the Dons (4-3), who previously won three straight. No. 8 City 55, Northwestern 17: The host Knights (5-0)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
Nathaniel duBois "Randy" Arnot Jr., a Baltimore financial adviser and volunteer, died Aug. 6 of a heart attack at his summer home in upstate New York's Thousand Islands area. He was 66. Mr. Arnot was at his longtime vacation home in Wellesley Island, N.Y., when stricken. Mr. Arnot, the son of a maritime joiner and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was a 1962 graduate of St. Paul's School and earned a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1966 from the University of Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 2, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2009
THURSDAY 'Preserving Treasures' In honor of Preservation Month, the Enoch Pratt Free Library's preservation department displays an array of techniques the library uses and the average person can use to preserve books, photos, CDs, DVDs and other items. The exhibit, Simple Measures: Preserving Treasures, will be up through Aug. 22. The library is at 400 Cathedral St. Call 410-396-5430 or go to prattlibrary.org. Wine tasting Savor a variety of local wines, enjoy an array of foods and hear live music at the eighth annual Federal Hill South Wine Tasting, 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Thursday at the American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
In one of its most dominating performances of the season, the third-ranked and No. 1-seeded Dunbar Poets won their sixth straight Class 1A South regional title yesterday, beating W.E.B. Du Bois, 46-0. The Dunbar defense, led by senior captain Anthony Walters and helped by interceptions from Davon Muse and Christopher Boynton, recorded its third shutout of the season while holding the Panthers to just 79 rushing yards and none passing. "No one missed any assignments," said Muse, who returned his interception 63 yards for a touchdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2004
Andrea (Ani) Elise Quinby, daughter of Dennis and Mary Ellen Quinby, of Timonium, MD, was wed to Brendan William Boyd, son of Mary Boyd, of Charlotte, NC and William Boyd, of Atlanta, GA, on October 9, 2004. The ceremony was held at Timonium United Methodist Church. Dr. Rev. Fred Crider officiated. The reception followed at the Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor. The groom's mother hosted the rehearsal dinner at Germano's Trattoria in Little Italy. The Maid of Honor was Susan Goebel. Bridesmaids were Laurie Long, the bride's sister, Shelly Du Bois, the bride's sister, Kim Ollerhead, Carrie Heatherly, and Michelle Ballard.
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