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August 31, 2011
I just read a quote from a woman who said that she was told by Baltimore Gas & Electric that the company couldn't afford to give out dry ice to people without power. Why doesn't CEO Mayo Shattuck give up some of his millions for dry ice? If he and his cronies weren't milking the company dry, BGE could afford dry ice for its customers. Pat Harcarik, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Randy Race's shiny new generator was making a comforting racket Monday in the backyard of his home in Glendale in Baltimore County. When he woke up to find tree limbs down in front of his house after the storm, he decided he wasn't going to put up with another night in the darkness and heat. He jumped into his truck and drove to Pennsylvania, hitting every Home Depot and tractor supply store on his way, looking for a generator. Finding them sold out, he drove nearly to West Virginia until he got a tip that a Sykesville Home Depot would have a delivery of 120 on Sunday morning.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1999
A quarter-million Maryland homes remained without power in the wake of Hurricane Floyd yesterday, with residents jamming phone lines for help and scurrying for scarce dry ice to preserve refrigerators full of rapidly spoiling food.Adding to the chaos of the storm's aftermath was what utility officials called a freak occurrence: the loss of power to a major Baltimore waste treatment plant, causing a damaged pump to spew millions of gallons of raw sewage into the Jones Falls -- bound for the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
August 31, 2011
I just read a quote from a woman who said that she was told by Baltimore Gas & Electric that the company couldn't afford to give out dry ice to people without power. Why doesn't CEO Mayo Shattuck give up some of his millions for dry ice? If he and his cronies weren't milking the company dry, BGE could afford dry ice for its customers. Pat Harcarik, Baltimore
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 25, 1999
The Fed had to raise interest. Too many of us have jobs.Lawrence Bell spent $4,323 from campaign contributions in New York on clothes for himself and the establishment is scandalized that he went to Saks Fifth Avenue, not J. Press or Brooks Brothers.When Gov. Ventura refereed a pro wrestling bout, he demeaned 1. politics, 2. rassling, 3. Minnesota, 4. himself or 5. none of those. Choose one.Save water. Use dry ice.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
The Listmans wanted to save their venison, rockfish and five dozen soft-shell crabs. The Cummingses were worried how long their side of beef, chicken fillets and hot dogs would last. And Kelly R. Duly just wanted to know when her power would be back on.Tired and frustrated, they were among the thousands of Marylanders who were without electricity yesterday after a band of thunderstorms swept across the state Saturday evening, knocking power out to more than 110,000 residents.Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties fared worst in the storms, and yesterday, residents afraid of losing everything in their refrigerators and freezers lined up at two sites -- one in Harundale and one in Timonium -- for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s dry-ice giveaway.
NEWS
By Special to The Sun | October 31, 2007
HALLOWEEN DRINKS ARE ALL ABOUT frightful fun. And even if you've put off thoughts of entertaining until today, they're the perfect last-minute way to make a spooky splash when trick-or-treating starts tonight. This isn't a time for your attractive, mouthwatering drink ideas. Beverages for this ghoulish celebration must be fantastic, atrocious and even somewhat grotesque - the more frightening, the better. Think color when creating Halloween brews - green, red, blue, orange and black. To produce the necessary eerie hues, experiment with green, orange and black sodas (root beer or cola)
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1999
After a long weekend without power, thousands of Baltimore-area utility customers may finally be able to come out of the cold and dark today. Power was expected to be restored early today to most of the 10,000 customers who have been without service since Thursday night's ice storms, said Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. spokeswoman Brenda Pettigrew. That figure, as of midnight, was down from 29,000 earlier in the day. Most of the remaining outages were in Howard, Carroll and Baltimore counties, forcing customers to line up for dry ice, book hotel rooms, stay with relatives, crowd into restaurants -- and wait in frustration for their lights and heat to come back on. In Montgomery County, a fire and multiple explosions yesterday at a Potomac Electric Power Co. substation in Olney resulted in the loss of eight substations and knocked out electricity to an estimated 70,000 homes and businesses.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Joe Nawrozki and Alisa Samuels and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writers Staff writer Edward L. Heard Jr. contributed to this article | July 16, 1992
More than 5,300 people in the Baltimore metropolitan area remained without electrical power today after powerful thunderstorms ripped through the state yesterday.Winds of up to 58 mph were reported in some areas. Utility officials said most of the damage was caused by more than 3,000 lightning strikes and the winds.No injuries were reported.While Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. trouble-shooters worked to restore lost power today, the company was giving out 80,000 pounds of dry ice where the storms hit hardest.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Del Quentin Wilber and Reginald Fields and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2004
Fire officials began yesterday combing through charred debris left by a fire that swept through a huge, two-story ice factory in West Baltimore late Tuesday night and forced police to close two major roads through the evening rush hour yesterday. Authorities said it is too early to determine the cause of the fire, which started about 11:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Baltimore American Ice Co. plant in the 2100 block of W. Franklin St. The blaze was brought under control about 6:30 a.m. yesterday by more than 100 firefighters, and officials reported no injuries.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | January 6, 2008
Dropping a chunk of dry ice into an empty orange balloon, Nate Widom predicted that it would explode. "No, wait," the 10-year-old said yesterday. "It will blow itself up." After the mouth of the balloon was knotted off, it did just that. "As the solid heats up, it sublimates and inflates the balloon," explained Joyce A. Trageser, the supervisor of school programs at the Maryland Science Center and the instructor for its first Saturday Morning Science workshop of the year. "Think of it - it's a solid changing to a gas without becoming a liquid.
NEWS
By Special to The Sun | October 31, 2007
HALLOWEEN DRINKS ARE ALL ABOUT frightful fun. And even if you've put off thoughts of entertaining until today, they're the perfect last-minute way to make a spooky splash when trick-or-treating starts tonight. This isn't a time for your attractive, mouthwatering drink ideas. Beverages for this ghoulish celebration must be fantastic, atrocious and even somewhat grotesque - the more frightening, the better. Think color when creating Halloween brews - green, red, blue, orange and black. To produce the necessary eerie hues, experiment with green, orange and black sodas (root beer or cola)
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Del Quentin Wilber and Reginald Fields and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2004
Fire officials began yesterday combing through charred debris left by a fire that swept through a huge, two-story ice factory in West Baltimore late Tuesday night and forced police to close two major roads through the evening rush hour yesterday. Authorities said it is too early to determine the cause of the fire, which started about 11:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Baltimore American Ice Co. plant in the 2100 block of W. Franklin St. The blaze was brought under control about 6:30 a.m. yesterday by more than 100 firefighters, and officials reported no injuries.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel, Robert Little and Rona Kobell and Eric Siegel, Robert Little and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
Isabel arrived, and the lights went out in Maryland. After Hurricane Isabel left more than 1 million customers throughout Maryland without power, residents and utilities began yesterday the arduous task of coping with what officials described as the worst electrical outage in the state's history. BGE and Pepco, which serve the Baltimore and Washington areas, had hundreds of crews working 12- and 16-hour shifts to repair damaged power lines and substations. In some areas, life seemed to be at a near-standstill.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2003
Hundreds of sweaty Anne Arundel County residents who were still without power after Tuesday's strong storm lined up in a parking lot outside an Annapolis mall yesterday, awaiting a truck carrying about 20,000 pounds of dry ice. "I really don't know what good it will do. ... I've given up on the food in my refrigerator," said Joyce Nider, an Odenton resident who had been without power since 5:15 p.m. Tuesday but hoped the dry ice would help salvage some...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 20, 2002
FORT WORTH, Texas - Santa Claus never had to haul 400 ostriches to China. He left that chore to FedEx. "We had to bag their heads," said Ramiro Gonzalez, a senior manager at the FedEx Alliance Airport hub. "They would freak out if they could see." Nor did St. Nick ever haul a live killer whale. Ask UPS about that one. "Remember Free Willy?" asked John Manning, a United Parcel Service spokesman in Dallas. "We shipped Keiko the whale from Mexico to Oregon. And I know, from being a driver once, that we deliver live lobsters."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel, Robert Little and Rona Kobell and Eric Siegel, Robert Little and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
Isabel arrived, and the lights went out in Maryland. After Hurricane Isabel left more than 1 million customers throughout Maryland without power, residents and utilities began yesterday the arduous task of coping with what officials described as the worst electrical outage in the state's history. BGE and Pepco, which serve the Baltimore and Washington areas, had hundreds of crews working 12- and 16-hour shifts to repair damaged power lines and substations. In some areas, life seemed to be at a near-standstill.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 20, 2002
FORT WORTH, Texas - Santa Claus never had to haul 400 ostriches to China. He left that chore to FedEx. "We had to bag their heads," said Ramiro Gonzalez, a senior manager at the FedEx Alliance Airport hub. "They would freak out if they could see." Nor did St. Nick ever haul a live killer whale. Ask UPS about that one. "Remember Free Willy?" asked John Manning, a United Parcel Service spokesman in Dallas. "We shipped Keiko the whale from Mexico to Oregon. And I know, from being a driver once, that we deliver live lobsters."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. crews worked into last night trying to restore power to 11,600 remaining customers who spent Mother's Day without electricity after Saturday night's line of violent storms. Thirty support teams arrived from utilities in distant parts of the state to help, and BGE scrambled to dole out thousands of pounds of free dry ice to customers. The goal was to have power restored to everyone by midnight, but officials said they expected a few customers would be without electricity this morning.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1999
Baltimore public works employees stemmed the flow of raw sewage into the Jones Falls yesterday afternoon -- but not before 24 million gallons of waste spilled into the waterway and eventually flowed into the Inner Harbor.For two days, more than 20 city mechanics and electricians worked around the clock to fix three pumps at the Hampden facility, after a power failure Thursday during Hurricane Floyd shut down the station, officials said.When the power died, officials said, the station's pumps stopped working, and waste water began to fill the station.
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