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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
Giant Food, the region's largest grocery chain, announced Thursday that is outsourcing its dry-goods distribution business to a Jessup firm. The Landover-based grocer said Jessup Logistics LLC, an affiliate of C&S Wholesale Grocers, will take over the dry-goods operation by the end of the year. It is unclear how many of the 460 union workers and 130 nonunion workers at the plant could lose their jobs once the deal is completed. Jessup Logistics has agreed to adopt the contracts that Giant currently has with three local unions representing workers in the division, Giant spokeswoman Kim Brown said.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Giant Food has put its former dry goods warehouse in Jessup on the market, the real estate firm handling the listing said Monday. The now-vacant, 760,000-square-foot complex on 60 acres in the Maryland Wholesale Food Center on Assateague Drive supplied Giant grocery stores before the operation closed in June. The dry goods facility is owned by Giant, but the regional grocer outsourced its operation in 2011 to Jessup Logistics LLC, a subsidiary of New Hampshire-based C&S Wholesale Grocers.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 21, 2009
Jack Lipsitz, a retired co-owner of a Baltimore wholesale dry goods firm who was a World War II combat veteran, died Monday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Atrium Village Retirement Community in Owings Mills. The former longtime Pikesville resident was 93. Mr. Lipsitz was born in Baltimore and raised on Hanover Street, above his family's dry good business, D. Lipsitz and Sons, that had been founded by his father in 1900. After graduating from Southern High School in 1933, he joined his father in the business that sold clothing, underwear and towels to stores, family members said.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
A dry-goods warehouse in Jessup that supplies Giant Food grocery stores and employs about 250 people will close in June, the operator, Jessup Logistics LLC, said Wednesday. The subsidiary of New Hampshire-based C&S Wholesale Grocers said it will save about $13.5 million a year by shifting the distribution work from the traditional warehouse in Jessup to a more technologically advanced facility elsewhere. The company did not say where. "We've undertaken an extensive top-to-bottom evaluation of the operations to determine what solutions are available to provide the best value for our customer and the consumers who ultimately benefit from available savings," said Rick Stacy, a regional vice president who heads the operations, in a statement late Wednesday.
NEWS
July 22, 1991
Jeanette Goldman Askin, 80, who once operated a Baltimore dry goods store, died of cancer Wednesday at Sinai Hospital.Funeral services were held Friday at Sol Levinson and Brothers funeral establishment, 6010 Reisterstown Road.Mrs. Askin lived in Diplomat Condominiums on Clarks Lane. The Baltimore native was a graduate of Eastern High School.She worked as a dental technician before taking over the family-owned dry goods business, Askin and Askin, at 321 W. Baltimore St., after her husband, Milton, died in 1968.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
About 200 people — or nearly half the workers — who handle dry goods at the Jessup distribution center that serves Giant Food regionally will lose their jobs under a new contract negotiated with the union local, labor leaders said Monday. But union leaders with Teamsters Local 730, which represents 430 dry-goods workers who serve the region's largest grocery store chain, said the employees would be offered buyouts and jobs in other parts of the company. The facility also employs 380 people in fresh produce and 200 truck drivers, as well as workers in recycling.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
Union leaders representing hundreds of workers at a Giant Food distribution center in Jessup said the operator has given them oral notice that part of the facility would be shut down, resulting in hundreds of job losses. The company that runs the dry goods distribution facility denies giving workers official notice of impending layoffs but declined to answer questions about shuttering the dry goods distribution facility. Giant, the region's largest grocer, announced last year that it would outsource the dry goods business at the facility to New Hampshire-based C&S Wholesale Grocers.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | December 30, 1990
From the standpoint of employment, the biggest city industry of earlier days was "the needle trade": the making of what Americans put on their backs (and heads and feet). The clothing industry was not only the biggest employer in and around Baltimore -- it was one of the oldest.Baltimore's needle-trade shops made uniforms for Lafayette's troops sent from France in the 1770s. And for more than 100 years beginning about 1850, the needle trade was the No. 1 Baltimore employer of refugees from Europe.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
Reuben Henry Grodnitzky officially retired more than 20 years ago from the business he founded in the 1930s, but he never really stopped working.Until his final illness, the 87-year-old, known as "Mr. Henry," was a presence at Henry's Drapery and Shade Co. at 415 E. Oliver St.Mr. Grodnitzky, an Arbutus resident, died Thursday of pneumonia at Northwest Hospital."His retirement was a family joke," said Kim Shifren, a granddaughter. "He owned the business for almost 70 years and could never stop working.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | April 6, 2012
The Turkish equivalent of “bon appetit” is “afiyet olsun,” and it's a fitting sentiment after a visit to the new Turkish Family Market in Ellicott City. Indeed, everything in the shop -- from fresh desserts to dry goods to butcher meats -- is Turkish. Bahattin Kaymak and Nuran Kaymak run the family business with help from their daughter, Aleyna, 15, a freshman at Mt. Hebron High School, and son, Berkay, a Howard Community College student. Bahattin, an Ellicott City resident, said through an interpreter that he decided to open the market to serve the many Turkish, Mediterranean and Middle Eastern families in Howard County, as well as to tap into a broader interest in Turkish products.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | April 6, 2012
The Turkish equivalent of “bon appetit” is “afiyet olsun,” and it's a fitting sentiment after a visit to the new Turkish Family Market in Ellicott City. Indeed, everything in the shop -- from fresh desserts to dry goods to butcher meats -- is Turkish. Bahattin Kaymak and Nuran Kaymak run the family business with help from their daughter, Aleyna, 15, a freshman at Mt. Hebron High School, and son, Berkay, a Howard Community College student. Bahattin, an Ellicott City resident, said through an interpreter that he decided to open the market to serve the many Turkish, Mediterranean and Middle Eastern families in Howard County, as well as to tap into a broader interest in Turkish products.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
About 200 people — or nearly half the workers — who handle dry goods at the Jessup distribution center that serves Giant Food regionally will lose their jobs under a new contract negotiated with the union local, labor leaders said Monday. But union leaders with Teamsters Local 730, which represents 430 dry-goods workers who serve the region's largest grocery store chain, said the employees would be offered buyouts and jobs in other parts of the company. The facility also employs 380 people in fresh produce and 200 truck drivers, as well as workers in recycling.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
Union leaders representing hundreds of workers at a Giant Food distribution center in Jessup said the operator has given them oral notice that part of the facility would be shut down, resulting in hundreds of job losses. The company that runs the dry goods distribution facility denies giving workers official notice of impending layoffs but declined to answer questions about shuttering the dry goods distribution facility. Giant, the region's largest grocer, announced last year that it would outsource the dry goods business at the facility to New Hampshire-based C&S Wholesale Grocers.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
Giant Food, the region's largest grocery chain, has reached an agreement with the Teamsters union that will save hundreds of jobs at its dry-goods distribution business when it outsources the work to a Jessup firm later this year. The head of Teamsters Local 730, the union that represents workers at the distribution plant, said Tuesday that 341 full-time workers will keep their jobs at the Giant dry-goods business that's being contracted out to Jessup Logistics LLC, an affiliate of C&S Wholesale Grocers.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
Giant Food, the region's largest grocery chain, announced Thursday that is outsourcing its dry-goods distribution business to a Jessup firm. The Landover-based grocer said Jessup Logistics LLC, an affiliate of C&S Wholesale Grocers, will take over the dry-goods operation by the end of the year. It is unclear how many of the 460 union workers and 130 nonunion workers at the plant could lose their jobs once the deal is completed. Jessup Logistics has agreed to adopt the contracts that Giant currently has with three local unions representing workers in the division, Giant spokeswoman Kim Brown said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 21, 2009
Jack Lipsitz, a retired co-owner of a Baltimore wholesale dry goods firm who was a World War II combat veteran, died Monday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Atrium Village Retirement Community in Owings Mills. The former longtime Pikesville resident was 93. Mr. Lipsitz was born in Baltimore and raised on Hanover Street, above his family's dry good business, D. Lipsitz and Sons, that had been founded by his father in 1900. After graduating from Southern High School in 1933, he joined his father in the business that sold clothing, underwear and towels to stores, family members said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 31, 1992
Anybody who thinks Baltimore's garment-making industry is a thing of the past should visit 419 W. Baltimore St.But don't ask to buy anything."We're strictly wholesale, and we carry the better goods," says ,, Herbert Guss, the ebullient owner of a warehouse full of Irish linen, Japanese cottons, Chinese silks and New Zealand wools.Mr. Guss is the downtown survivor of the city's textile jobbers, a merchant who sells a tremendous stock of odd-lot fabrics to dry goods stores, custom tailors and clothing manufacturers.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
A dry-goods warehouse in Jessup that supplies Giant Food grocery stores and employs about 250 people will close in June, the operator, Jessup Logistics LLC, said Wednesday. The subsidiary of New Hampshire-based C&S Wholesale Grocers said it will save about $13.5 million a year by shifting the distribution work from the traditional warehouse in Jessup to a more technologically advanced facility elsewhere. The company did not say where. "We've undertaken an extensive top-to-bottom evaluation of the operations to determine what solutions are available to provide the best value for our customer and the consumers who ultimately benefit from available savings," said Rick Stacy, a regional vice president who heads the operations, in a statement late Wednesday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
Reuben Henry Grodnitzky officially retired more than 20 years ago from the business he founded in the 1930s, but he never really stopped working.Until his final illness, the 87-year-old, known as "Mr. Henry," was a presence at Henry's Drapery and Shade Co. at 415 E. Oliver St.Mr. Grodnitzky, an Arbutus resident, died Thursday of pneumonia at Northwest Hospital."His retirement was a family joke," said Kim Shifren, a granddaughter. "He owned the business for almost 70 years and could never stop working.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | January 26, 1995
Depending upon their ages, Baltimoreans remember the dry-goods temple at Howard and Lexington streets as either Bernheimer-Leader or the May Co. or Hecht-May or the Hecht Co.The department store opened in May 1925 and remained a stalwart of the Howard Street shopping district until the retail scene got so bad that the store had to close.Now comes word that the corporation that owns the Rite Aid pharmacies, has purchased the store.There is something odd about Rite Aid purchasing the old Hecht outlet.
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