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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2011
Baltimore's Inner Harbor will look a little bare this week after two of its premier attractions — the submarine Torsk and the 1854 sloop of war Constellation — are towed away for a month of repairs in dry dock. The Torsk will be the first to go as tugs move in around 9 a.m. Sunday to escort the World War II veteran down the harbor to the Sparrows Point Shipyard. The Constellation will follow at about 9 a.m. on Monday, according to Chris Rowsom, executive director of Historic Ships in Baltimore, part of the Living Classrooms Foundation and the ships' caretaker.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | May 6, 2013
Back in February, before we knew about crippling fears of water and low likeability factors and One Mullet to Rule Them All, 11 teams began a race around the world. Stuff happened with cheese and haggis. Alliances formed, craziness surfaced, teeth detached. And now it's time (cue Phil's eyebrow) for the finale of "The Amazing Race" (cue music). The top four teams leave Scotland and all take the same ferry to Belfast, Northern Ireland. While driving themselves to a park, Max and Katie's instincts tell them to turn around.
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NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 2, 1992
BOSTON -- With a thumbs-up from its captain and three cheers from its crew, the patched Queen Elizabeth 2 floated out of a South Boston dry dock yesterday and returned to sea, leaving a wake of hope for the region's job-hungry shipworkers."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
When the Coast Guard's tall ship Eagle glided under the Key Bridge on Wednesday morning, it looked a lot better than it did when it arrived at the Inner Harbor four months ago. A fresh coat of white paint covered the upper hull. Six miles of ropes and rigging were tightrope-taut. And from the ship's bow jutted a regilded eagle, its talons gripping the Coast Guard crest. "She's done and she's looking good," said John Downes, a Baltimore native who supervised the team of Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard workers that carried out the $5 million refurbishing, from keel to mast tip. Escorted by a Maryland Natural Resources Police boat and two tugs, the 295-foot ship turned down the Chesapeake Bay on its way to the Atlantic and its home port at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 23, 1991
Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s struggling Sparrows Point shipyard has landed its second big contract in as many months, the company announced yesterday.The Navy has awarded the yard a contract worth more than $25 million for the overhaul of the Sustain, a floating dry dock based at the Norfolk Naval Base. The work is expected to provide work for 650 workers for about five months.In September, Bethlehem secured a $60 million contract to build tunnel sections for an interstate highway under Boston Harbor.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
A dry dock that needs millions of dollars in repairs arrived at Baltimore Marine Industries yesterday, but the huge award could slip away if a competing shipyard has its way. BMI won the $16.6 million Navy contract last month, but a Virginia shipyard that also bid for the project quickly filed a protest with the General Accounting Office alleging that it, not BMI, should have won the job. Norfolk Shipbuilding & Drydock Corp. (Norshipco) argued in its Aug. 25 protest that BMI underestimated the cost to transport and house those crew members of the Resolute dry dock who must stay with it in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1998
It floats.After 19 months and more than 160,000 man-hours of labor at the Fort McHenry Dry Dock, the 1854 warship Constellation was refloated yesterday. It will be towed upriver next week to begin 11 more months of restoration at the Maryland Port Administration's Pier 8."Constellation has an outstanding future in a new century and a new millennium," said Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who spoke to an overflow crowd at the dockside launch ceremonies.Like any old war veteran, the ship let out a few creaks and groans as it rose from the bottom of the graving dock.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
A decade of neglect will draw to a close tomorrow as the sagging, rot-riddled warship Constellation is towed from the Inner Harbor for 2 1/2 years of reconstruction at Fort McHenry -- its first major repair since 1982.If all goes well, it should return in spring 1999 with a straightened keel and a look truer to its 1854 origins. It will get a new hull, two new decks and masts and rigging to replace those removed in 1994 to ensure they didn't fall on tourists.Louis F. Linden, executive director of the Constellation Foundation, said he expects the move will be so uneventful it will "put the entire harbor to sleep."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
The 1854 sloop of war Constellation and the World War II submarine Torsk are due back in Baltimore's Inner Harbor Monday after seven weeks in dry dock for scrubbing and repairs. The Constellation is scheduled to be towed from the Sparrow's Point Shipyard at 9 a.m., arriving at Pier 1 by 10 a.m. The Torsk will follow, arriving about 2 p.m., according to Chris Rowsom, executive director of Historic Ships in Baltimore, the vessels' caretakers. The move is about three weeks late, the result of unexpected rot discovered in Constellation's hull.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2000
Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. said yesterday that it won a $16.6 million Navy contract to overhaul a floating dry dock. The USS Resolute, a dock the Navy uses to lift ships out of the water for repairs, will arrive at the Sparrows Point shipyard about Sept. 19. The overhaul is to be completed in February. The job is expected to provide work for an average of 200 workers. "It's a huge contract for us compared to vessels we've done recently," said shipyard President and Chief Executive Officer David Cassidy.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
The 1854 sloop of war Constellation and the World War II submarine Torsk are due back in Baltimore's Inner Harbor Monday after seven weeks in dry dock for scrubbing and repairs. The Constellation is scheduled to be towed from the Sparrow's Point Shipyard at 9 a.m., arriving at Pier 1 by 10 a.m. The Torsk will follow, arriving about 2 p.m., according to Chris Rowsom, executive director of Historic Ships in Baltimore, the vessels' caretakers. The move is about three weeks late, the result of unexpected rot discovered in Constellation's hull.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Workers repairing the 1854 sloop of war Constellation have uncovered significant rot in the ship's hull. The damage, attributed to rainwater seeping into the hull from the gun ports, is expected to lengthen the ship's time in dry dock at the Sparrows Point Shipyard by 10 to 14 days and add about $70,000 to the $500,000 repair bill. The water intrusion has been stopped, and some of the rotted wood has been cut out and replaced. But Chris Rowsom, executive director of Historic Ships in Baltimore, said the Constellation will need more extensive repairs in two to three years that could take it away from the Inner Harbor for up to six months.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
Out of the water for the first time since 1998, the 1854 sloop of war Constellation looked pretty good to its caretakers Thursday as they walked beneath its grimy hull, now propped up in dry dock at the Sparrows Point Shipyard. "I think we're surprised she's as clean as she is, for being in the water for 13 years," said Chris Rowsom, executive director for Historic Ships in Baltimore. "It shouldn't be too difficult to get her washed up and painted. " High on blocks just aft of Constellation is the 1944 submarine Torsk, which faces much more extensive work.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2011
Baltimore's Inner Harbor will look a little bare this week after two of its premier attractions — the submarine Torsk and the 1854 sloop of war Constellation — are towed away for a month of repairs in dry dock. The Torsk will be the first to go as tugs move in around 9 a.m. Sunday to escort the World War II veteran down the harbor to the Sparrows Point Shipyard. The Constellation will follow at about 9 a.m. on Monday, according to Chris Rowsom, executive director of Historic Ships in Baltimore, part of the Living Classrooms Foundation and the ships' caretaker.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Firefighters continue to investigate the cause of a Tuesday night fire involving a 270-foot long Coast Guard boat. Lt. Cliff Kooser, spokesman with the Anne Arundel County fire department, said about 47 firefighters were called at 10:32 p.m. to a dry dock in the Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard, where smoke coming from the hull of the ship. Kooser said the firefighters had to climb up four stories to get inside the boat that was in the dry dock and then travel down three floors to the third level of the main deck.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
The Coast Guard plans to take no action to clean up the first of seven contaminated sites at its yard on Curtis Bay. A proposed new remediation plan - the first completed for the Superfund site - found that though cyanide, lead and other dangerous substances remain in the sediment under dry docks on the property, the level are too low to warrant concern. "It's an acceptable risk," Robert DeMarco, environmental engineer for the yard, said yesterday. "The numbers are decided by the [Environmental Protection Agency]
NEWS
November 30, 1996
FINGERS WERE crossed and prayers whispered as tugs pushed the 142-year-old wooden warship Constellation a mile and a half to dry dock a week ago. The little voyage took an hour and 48 minutes, to make sure no mishap occurred aboard the fragile vessel that suffers from rot -- far better than the four hours that had been predicted. While the ship did take on water, high-speed auxiliary pumps didn't have to be used. It was an auspicious beginning for a project that means much to Baltimore.When there was little else to see at the Inner Harbor there was the Constellation.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
With a competing shipyard's protest out of the way, Baltimore Marine Industries said yesterday that its hourly work force is expected to reach 400 within the next few weeks as work proceeds on a formerly contested Navy contract. Baltimore Marine won the $16.6 million bid to overhaul the Resolute dry dock in late summer, but the job was put on hold when Norfolk Shipbuilding & Drydock Corp. (Norshipco) filed a protest with the General Accounting Office, alleging that it should have won the job. Norshipco withdrew its protest after the Navy refused to let the dry dock remain idle during the GAO's investigation.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 15, 2006
A friend called to report that the Nobska, the venerable New England coastal steamer that for a time was an Inner Harbor restaurant during the 1970s, was broken up last month at the old Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston. The ship's scrapping marked an end to the more than 30-year preservation effort of the New England Steamship Foundation - originally founded in 1975 as the Friends of the Nobska - to save the historic ship. For 48 years, the classic white-and-black vessel with its straight bows, tall buff-colored funnel and ear-piercing steam whistle, steamed back and forth across Nantucket Sound, transporting freight, automobiles and generations of vacation-bound passengers to Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard from the mainland.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Jason Song and Candus Thomson and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
A rising tide may float all boats, but a lot of Chesapeake Bay skippers with one eye on Isabel and another on their nautical investment aren't waiting to find out. Pleasure cruisers and charter fishing boats were being put in dry dock or sailed out of the storm's path yesterday, even as blue skies gave no indication of the forecasted threat. "There was no doubt I was going to pull it out," said Ralph Beatty, who surveyed his 48-foot cabin cruiser in its temporary cradle at Herrington Harbour North Marina in southern Anne Arundel County.
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