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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
According to Dry Creek, this was an "almost perfect" vintage for zinfandel. That's particularly significant because Dry Creek has demonstrated to my satisfaction that its zinfandels can age brilliantly for decades in top vintages. (Samples of the 1997, 1981 and 1979 Dry Creek zinfandels were exceptional in recent tastings.) This full-bodied red wine, bolstered with 13 percent petite sirah, is superbly flavorful - with generous raspberry and blackberry fruit and hints or anise, chocolate, black pepper and herbs.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
According to Dry Creek, this was an "almost perfect" vintage for zinfandel. That's particularly significant because Dry Creek has demonstrated to my satisfaction that its zinfandels can age brilliantly for decades in top vintages. (Samples of the 1997, 1981 and 1979 Dry Creek zinfandels were exceptional in recent tastings.) This full-bodied red wine, bolstered with 13 percent petite sirah, is superbly flavorful - with generous raspberry and blackberry fruit and hints or anise, chocolate, black pepper and herbs.
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FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | October 26, 1994
Year in and year out, this is one of California's best values. It's crisp, clean and dry, with none of the tutti-frutti quality of many California chenin blancs. It would be even better if Dry Creek could get this wine to market in time for summer, which is when you can really use a refreshing wine such as this one.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | August 2, 2006
This voluptuous, ripe, full-bodied red wine displays a smooth, silky texture and intense flavors of plums, blackberries and chocolate. It's a good amalgam of traditional Rhone Valley style and California ripeness. While good now, it will certainly develop over five to seven years. Serve with beef, lamb, chili.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | December 25, 2002
2001 Preston of Dry Creek "Hartsock" Sauvignon Blanc, Dry Creek Valley ($18). This well-crafted Sonoma County white wine grabs hold of the palate with penetrating flavors of sweet peas, herbs, pears and juniper. It shows excellent balance and, while it is definitely an herbal wine, it doesn't push that quality to extremes. Serve it with highly spiced seafood dishes or Cajun cuisine. Apart from this wine, readers should be aware that Preston is one of the most consistent performers in its price category in California.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 6, 2003
2002 Dry Creek Vineyard Fume Blanc, Sonoma County ($13). Another vintage, another Dry Creek fume blanc to recommend. Year after year, Dry Creek produces exceptional wine from this grape, also known as sauvignon blanc, at a very reasonable price. This year's version is bone-dry and complex, with fresh and intense flavors of gooseberry, herbs, pears and minerals. A little severe to drink by itself, it cried out to be served with seafood -- especially grilled salmon.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | August 16, 2000
1999 Dry Creek Fume Blanc, Sonoma County ($12). This perennial overachiever reaches new heights of complexity and vibrancy in this superb 1999. Dry Creek's fume (sauvignon blanc) offers a penetrating mix of pear, orange, lime, kiwi, juniper, gooseberry, tropical fruit and herb flavors. For a $12 white wine, there's a lot going on here. Pair this intense, well-balanced wine with spicy fish or crab dishes or with Cajun-style chicken.-
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | March 8, 2006
2005 Dry Creek Vineyard Dry Chenin Blanc, Clarksburg ($10.50) Spring is a-coming and it's time to load up on Dry Creek chenin blanc -- consistently one of California's best deals in a dry white wine. It's good to see Dry Creek getting this wine out to market while it's still young and fresh. It's a vibrant wine with a smorgasbord of flavors -- pear, minerals, mint, melon, cherry, lime -- and a crisp, crackling feel. It's best if consumed between now and Labor Day. Serve with soft-shell crabs, spicy Asian food.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | September 27, 2000
1998 Dry Creek Vineyard Old Vines Zinfandel, Sonoma County ($18). The 1998 vintage in northern California was not a kind one for zinfandel, and many respected producers turned in subpar performances. Not so with Dry Creek, whose Old Vines bottling is a rich, balanced, chunky and satisfying red wine with no obvious flaws. It's a meaty, earthy wine with plenty of blackberry and pepper flavor. Dry Creek manages to deliver impressive power without going over the top. Serve with grilled steak, venison or a hearty stew or pasta dish.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | March 8, 2006
2005 Dry Creek Vineyard Dry Chenin Blanc, Clarksburg ($10.50) Spring is a-coming and it's time to load up on Dry Creek chenin blanc -- consistently one of California's best deals in a dry white wine. It's good to see Dry Creek getting this wine out to market while it's still young and fresh. It's a vibrant wine with a smorgasbord of flavors -- pear, minerals, mint, melon, cherry, lime -- and a crisp, crackling feel. It's best if consumed between now and Labor Day. Serve with soft-shell crabs, spicy Asian food.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | September 21, 2005
If you're a fan of no-holds-barred zinfandel, this is a sterling example of the breed - with true "old vines" character and intense blackberry, spice and black-pepper flavors. Made from vines older than 80 years old, it's not for the faint of palate. For all its power, its texture is smooth and there's no sign of alcoholic heat in the finish. Serve with - - pizza, pasta, red meat
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | July 14, 2004
2003 Preston of Dry Creek Vin Gris, Rose Table Wine, Dry Creek Valley ($10). Summer is the time of year to enjoy dry, crisp rose wines - and California is now producing some of the finest pink wines in the world. They may lack snob appeal, but roses such as this one deliver plenty of flavor without the cloying sweetness that has given the category a bad name. This wine exudes gripping flavors of strawberry, cherry and herbs and finishes clean and long. It would be a fine companion to grilled seafood or can stand on its own as an aperitif.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | December 25, 2002
2001 Preston of Dry Creek "Hartsock" Sauvignon Blanc, Dry Creek Valley ($18). This well-crafted Sonoma County white wine grabs hold of the palate with penetrating flavors of sweet peas, herbs, pears and juniper. It shows excellent balance and, while it is definitely an herbal wine, it doesn't push that quality to extremes. Serve it with highly spiced seafood dishes or Cajun cuisine. Apart from this wine, readers should be aware that Preston is one of the most consistent performers in its price category in California.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | May 16, 2001
2000 Dry Creek Vineyard Dry Chenin Blanc, Clarksburg ($8.75). If only more California wineries knew what to do with chenin blanc, a classic but underappreciated white-wine grape from the Loire Valley of France. Too few make chenin blanc at all, and too many of those make it syrupy-sweet. Not Dry Creek. Its chenin blanc is bone-dry, fresh, crisp, delightful and sensationally priced. It offers subtle flavors of apple, melon, minerals and sweet peas -- with maybe just a hint of cherry. It's an exceptional summer wine to serve with seafood or Asian cuisine or to enjoy by itself.
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