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NEWS
September 8, 2010
Rob Kasper wrote a heartfelt editorial on Saturday about the beauty and charm of Baltimore's largest and most vital public park, Druid Hill ("Heart of a city," Sept. 4). Unfortunately, Druid Hill Park's heart, and greatest asset, was hardly mentioned. The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , formerly known as the Baltimore Zoo, is literally in the center of the park, encompassing 135 acres of the park's 745. It employs 240 people and cares for more than 1,200 animals representing more than 175 species.
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NEWS
September 4, 2010
I had biked no more than 10 yards into Druid Hill Park one Saturday morning when I met a white-tailed deer. The deer bolted. My heart jolted. I had recorded another park memory. Druid Hill Park, all 745 acres of it, attracts an impressive collection of human and animal life. This fall marks the 150 t h anniversary of the park, and many celebrations are planned. The Friends of Druid Hill Park, a volunteer group dedicated to maintaining and reinvigorating the park, has scheduled a number of events in October, including tours, sports festivals, a tree planting day and a gala at the Mansion House.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
A 29-year-old man was fatally shot early Monday a few blocks south of Druid Hill Park, according to Baltimore police. An officer responded about 2:49 a.m. to the 2700 block of Parkwood Ave. for a report of gunshots and found the man suffering from gunshot wounds. The victim, identified as Louis Scott of the 2700 block of Parkwood Ave., was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was pronounced dead at 3:29 a.m., police said. Homicide detectives were investigating, and anyone with information was asked to call 410-396-2100.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
The summer has been brutally hot, with at least 44 days of 90-plus temperatures. This week, the financially strapped city of Baltimore had to close nearly all of its swimming pools early. Into this sweltering situation stepped a citizen savior, J. P. Grant. His firm, Grant Capital Management, donated $90,000 to keep the popular pool in Druid Hill Park open until Labor Day. Mr. Grant's lease financing firm, based in Columbia, has done business with the city as well as with other municipalities around the nation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
Central Maryland is headed back into the steamer this week as this seemingly endless summer of 90-degree temperatures, high humidity and nasty air pollution refuses to release its grip. Forecasters say that high temperatures Tuesday and Wednesday will threaten 110-year-old records, even as Baltimore's financially strapped government has closed nearly all of its 41 swimming pools for the summer. The only good weather-related news to be found Monday was word that Grant Capital Management, a local firm that has provided millions of dollars in lease financing for the city and its housing authority, stepped forward with a $90,000 donation to keep the Druid Hill Park pool open through Labor Day. J.P. Grant , the company's president and CEO, said in a statement that he grew up not far from the park and recalls the friends he made at the pool and "overcoming my fear of swimming.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Four years after a 14-year-old girl was electrocuted at Druid Hill Park while playing softball, a Baltimore judge will decide Friday whether to dismiss a civil case against an electrical firm the city hired for nearby repair work. Del Electric worked near Druid Hill Park's lower bowl softball fields at least six times in the three years before Deanna Green's death, including two months before the accident, according to court papers. Deanna's parents, Anthony and Nancy Green, sued Del Electric for damages.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
When a building gets to be 117 years old, it's going to need some attention. But what happens when the money's not there? That was the situation facing the Druid Hill Family Center Y, one of the oldest YMCAs in the nation, dating to 1885, and a cornerstone of its West Baltimore neighborhood. It was on the mind of board member Perry P. Savoy late last year when he was putting together plans for the organization's annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Breakfast. Instead of just having people sit down together for a meal, Perry said, he thought about doing something more lasting, more in tune with King's activist spirit and the Y's mission.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
WJZ sports director Mark Viviano was assaulted by teens as he jogged through Druid Hill Park on Tuesday afternoon, police said. Viviano was wearing headphones as he ran through the park and past three teens when one struck him in the head from behind, said Agent Donny Moses, a spokesman with city department. Viviano said he did not hear the teens come up behind him about 1 p.m. He said a second teen tried to hit him but missed. He said they exchanged words, but Viviano continued to run, while the teens ran the other way. Viviano said he was not injured.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Diane Bateman didn't have a dog on her arm Sunday. She had a picture of one pinned to her chest — Molly, her beloved beagle that died six years ago at age 14 but, while alive, never missed a chance to join in the Maryland SPCA's March for the Animals. So Bateman marched in Molly's honor along with her daughter, Margie Carney, and her year-old pup Darby Wish (named because Margie wished for a puppy for so long). "It's a nice way to still do something with Molly and to support a great cause," Bateman said.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2010
On a partly sunny and breezy Saturday, a crowd gathered in Druid Hill Park to learn about solar panels and wind energy. They also heard about rain barrels, public transportation and saving the Chesapeake Bay at the seventh annual EcoFest, a day to share the latest green information and products. It's hosted by Baltimore Green Works, a nonprofit that promotes sustainable ways of living. The festival kicks off a week of environment-themed events throughout the city. A few thousand people from across the city and surrounding area were expected to peruse the tables set up by environmental groups and companies interested in hooking more people.
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