Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDruid
IN THE NEWS

Druid

NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 28, 2013
For nearly 20 years, I watched a landmark stone house deteriorate. Once one of the proudest addresses in the city, the home of the Druid Hill Park superintendent and later the Maryland Zoo director became vacant. Trees began growing through its windows after its slate roof collapsed. Its stout stone walls were tumbling down. Sitting on a rise at the western edge of the city park, it became a symbol of neglect, an example of what can go wrong within city government. Then, about a year ago, this depressing situation began to change.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
The week after Memorial Day sees the return of a good bunch of popular farmers' markets. The Lauraville Farmers' Market starts up again on Tuesday. This sweet little market, sponsored by Hamilton-Lauraville Main Street, runs every Tuesday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., through Oct. 15 at 4500 Harford Road, across from the Safeway. The Baltimore County Farmers Market at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium returns on Wednesday. The market continues every Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., through Oct. 30. The Druid Hill Farmers' Market is back on Wednesday for its third year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Barbara Shapiro's love affair with Druid Hill Park dates to her childhood, when she passed through it daily on the way from her Ashburton home to old School 49 on Cathedral Street. And even when construction of Druid Park Lake Drive in the 1940s and the Jones Falls Expressway in the 1960s removed many of its grand entrances, Shapiro never lost her affection for the park. "I do think construction of the Jones Falls did separate the city from the park," Shapiro, 78, said the other day. She also recalled attending the city's annual one-day Baltimore Outdoor Art Festival during the 1950s until its demise in the 1970s, held on the periphery of the Druid Hill Park Reservoir.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 8, 2013
A Roland Park resident has created a "passport" to Druid Hill Park. Janet Felsten, founder and director of the nonprofit group Baltimore Green Map, introduced the green-colored passport April 19 at a Baltimore Green Week kickoff party in the conservatory. Felsten said she created the 20-page, passport-shaped booklet on cover stock paper as a companion to a detailed map of Druid Hill Park that she made in 2010. The purpose of the map and the new passport is partly to point out places of interest in the 745-acre park, which is home to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, Druid Lake and the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens, among other attractions.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
He has used a chain saw to carve intricate wooden sculptures for years, but when Mark Acton won a commission to hew two big new statues by the reservoir in Druid Hill Park, he wasn't sure he could pull it off. His material would be two tree stumps, each more than 12 feet tall and 20 feet around. Both were red oaks, which have especially tough wood. And when he first inspected them, he saw that each had lots of termite damage - the reason the city had cut them down. "'I thought, 'What in the world have I gotten myself into?
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 31, 2012
Superstorm Sandy may not have hit Baltimore as hard as weather forecasters had warned, but it did claim one of the city's oldest trees, an impressive Osage orange in Druid Hill Park that's been estimated to be nearly four centuries old. As reported Tuesday morning by my Baltimore Sun colleague Steve Kilar, (a "scoop" wrongly attributed to the Baltimore Brew when I first posted this - sorry, Steve!) the tree fell across Greenspring Avenue on Monday as winds and rain lashed the region.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Baltimore's scenic reservoirs could be transformed into lakes criss-crossed by rowboats as the city removes them from the water supply to comply with a federal health mandate. To meet the 2006 federal water safety rule to protect drinking water from contaminants, the city is spending tens of millions of dollars to install underground tanks to replace the reservoirs. The Department of Public Works will fill its small reservoir in Guilford to install tanks there, but other reservoirs will be decommissioned by 2018 and could become places for recreation.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
Baltimore endured a second consecutive weekend of deadly gunfire, adding two fatal shootings to the six that occurred during Labor Day weekend as police seek neighborhood cooperation to help stem the violence. A double shooting in Druid Heights early Saturday morning — in which a young father was killed around the corner from his home and a second man wounded — had neighbors shaking their heads, though they acknowledged recent improvements in the neighborhood. It comes as a child shot in crossfire in the same community continues to recover from his injuries.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
City police were investigating at least two shootings Monday evening, in the Barclay and Druid Heights neighborhoods.  Details weren't immediately available. The first incident was reported at 5:40 p.m. in the 2200 block of Guilford Ave., in the Barclay neighborhood just north of city schools headquarters.  At the scene, the shooting appeared to have occurred inside a home. Children played basketball on a nearby court, and bicyclists diverted their paths around the crime scene.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
A 9-year-old boy was critically wounded Sunday night in a triple shooting in Druid Heights, police said. Anthony Guglielmi, the Baltimore Police Department's chief spokesman, said officers responding to a report of a shooting found the boy sitting inside a vehicle, where he was being held by his mother and was bleeding from his stomach. He was taken to a hospital and was listed in critical but stable condition.  Patrol officers learned of the shooting at about 12:03 a.m., when they were sitting in the 2100 block of McCulloh St. and saw 20 to 30 people running from the 400 block of Bloom St., Guglielmi said.  A woman flagged down the officers, and said her son and grandson had just been shot.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.