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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
When a building gets to be 117 years old, it's going to need some attention. But what happens when the money's not there? That was the situation facing the Druid Hill Family Center Y, one of the oldest YMCAs in the nation, dating to 1885, and a cornerstone of its West Baltimore neighborhood. It was on the mind of board member Perry P. Savoy late last year when he was putting together plans for the organization's annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Breakfast. Instead of just having people sit down together for a meal, Perry said, he thought about doing something more lasting, more in tune with King's activist spirit and the Y's mission.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Carlton H. Dotson, a retired spokesman for the Maryland State Lottery and a tennis player who helped integrate the Druid Hill Park tennis courts in the late 1940s, died of complications from a stroke Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital. A resident of Eutaw Place in Reservoir Hill, he was 82. Born in Baltimore and known as "Yummy," he was raised on Madison Avenue near Druid Hill Park. He was the son of Charles Edward "Blue" Dotson, a maitre d'hotel and Miller Bros. Restaurant bartender, and Lucille Harde, a homemaker.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | June 26, 1995
Six o'clock rolls around,You just finished wiping your car down.Time to cruise to the park where it looks like a car show -- "Summertime," D. J. Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince.The Park.In Baltimore, there is little question which park is The Park.Each Sunday, Druid Hill Park -- the city's largest park and perhaps the best place to profile/hang out/be seen/polish a spotless car/profile some more/check out sweet young thangs -- rocks.Sunday at The Park is when hundreds of immaculately clean cars line a stretch known as "Looker's Row" between the basketball courts and the reservoir as their owners -- ever worried about scratches -- lean lightly on their hoods.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
Thank you for your coverage of this past weekend's Art Outside festival - a real gem of an event for everyone in Baltimore ("Art Outside returns to Druid Hill Park," May 16). My wholehearted congratulations to Barbara Shapiro and her team who succeeded (for the second year in a row) to bring together a true cross section of the community through a festival that not only celebrated visual and performing arts but also another gem of ours, Druid Hill Park. It was not lost on me, however, that many of the patrons of this event probably have not set foot in the park in many years - other than to come to this now-annual event or to visit The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore . Perhaps we can use the energy surrounding Art Outside to begin a region-wide discussion on how the park (and other beautiful spaces in the city)
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2004
It started with a camellia plant, a gift from "the Orient" that needed a home during Baltimore's frigid winters. Then history and fads kicked in, prompting city officials to build in 1888 a glass conservatory that became a staple of Druid Hill outings in the early 20th century, before the conservatory was left to languish. Now, once again, the Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens has urban trends on its side. The soaring glass-and-iron structure reopens today with new greenhouses, plants and additions a decade after community members and city officials started fighting its decay.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
Last week, its boughs were decorated with ornaments and lights that reflected the warmth and splendor of Christmas. But today, the tree is slumped in a corner, shedding pine needles, and you're looking for an environmentally sound way to get rid of it.Well, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and recycling officials in Baltimore and Baltimore County may have the solution to your problem.Baltimore will operate several sites where people can exchange their Christmas trees for mulch.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley says he won't hire a new parks chief to replace the one he fired last week until his acting director, Kimberley M. Amprey, shakes up the department. "I'm not looking for a permanent director," O'Malley said Friday. "I'm looking to improve the appearance of our parks and the performance of rec and parks now, and Kim Amprey is going to do it. "When our parks are cleaned and the department is on the path of constant improvement, we'll look for a permanent director. Until that time, leaders of that department need to get with the program or get new jobs.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | April 20, 1992
A prayer, carried by the wind and Mickey Mouse, gently floated down onto the deck outside my parents' home on Providence Road in Towson on Good Friday, somehow avoiding capture by the many surrounding trees.The prayer, written on a piece of paper and attached with a red ribbon to a silver foil Mickey Mouse balloon along with a $5 bill that had the word "GOD" written on it in black felt pen, said:"I know I'm late with this. I also know you'll understand. Please show me the way to renew my faith.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 1997
As homecomings go, Dru Hill's return to Baltimore this evening could be a bit more elaborate.After eight months of nonstop touring and recording, the Baltimore-based quartet arrives in town early this evening, after an all-day drive from Atlanta. It will go straight to the Baltimore Arena, where Dru Hill opens the Budweiser Superfest, sharing the bill with Mary J. Blige, Aliyaah, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony and Ginuwine. Once the group has performed, its members will spend time with their families before hitting the road again tomorrow.
NEWS
December 12, 1992
When the first Young Men's Christian Association was founded in London in 1844, England was battling with the social upheavals of the industrial revolution.Urbanization and sweat shops had brought about all kinds of societal problems which threatened the spiritual and material well-being of city dwellers. By drawing young men first to prayer circles and then to varied programs of athletics and uplifting, the YMCA movement wanted to compete with the lure of streets and bright lights.The worldwide YMCA movement has had its ups and downs since those days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Owens and For the Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Maryland visual artists, craft artisans, designers and other creative types who live, work or study in the region will be spotlighted at Sunday's Art Outside. Festival-goers should expect entertainment, food trucks and other vendors, as well as family-oriented activities, including a performance by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's youth musicians, OrchKids. "I wanted to bring people together and have some place for the new, up-and-coming artists at Station North and artists from all over the state to show their stuff," said Barbara Shapiro, 79, a retired educator who is the founder of Art Outside.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
LaMikgo Biega arranged mulch around the base of a small oak tree in Druid Hill Park as her son Xavier, 9, helped with the task. "You gotta move it away from the tree," Biega, 47, told her son, spreading the mulch to ensure that thick piles don't inhibit the growth of the tree, planted in 2010 to celebrate the park's 150th anniversary. She asked Xavier for a rake, and the boy leapt up and ran off to find one. Biega, who moved to the Baltimore area from Florida to start a new job in sales at Comcast this month, brought Xavier and her other son, Kingston, 6, with her Saturday for Comcast Cares Day. The event, co-sponsored by the city's Public Works Department and Baltimore Green Works, drew hundreds of the company's employees and their friends and families to Druid Hill Park for tree maintenance, landscaping, fence building, litter pickup and other service activities.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
Homicide detectives were investigating an afternoon shooting that occurred Friday in West Baltimore in a residential area between Mondawmin Mall and Druid Hill Park. The shooting occurred at about 3:45 p.m. in the rear of the 2200 block of Liberty Heights Ave. Homicide detectives were summoned to the scene due to the severity of his injuries, but as of Saturday morning, police said the victim remained in critical condition. Last week, a 47-year-old man was fatally shot in the same neighborhood, a few blocks south in the 2800 block of Parkwood Ave. The Safe Streets anti-violence program had held a peace rally two days later — and was shut down temporarily by the Health Department on Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| September 24, 2013
Adventure and fresh air? Sounds like a winner to me. Here's what organizers have to say about Hike & Seek: "National Wildlife Federation (NWF), America's largest conservation organization, is pleased to announce the Hike & Seek event at Druid Hill Park on October 26 in Baltimore.  Hike & Seek is a family outing that inspires a child's sense of adventure by combining a nature hike and scavenger hunt. The event brings families together for a few hours in the great outdoors for some fresh fall air and fun and provides an opportunity to rediscover nature.
FEATURES
By Allison Brickell
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 16, 2013
This Saturday hundreds of people are expected to converge on Druid Hill Park - some pushing strollers, some toddling alongside their moms - to raise awareness about prenatal health. The second annual Baby Buggy Walk in the Park is an attempt to promote healthy lifestyles for women who are pregnant or people - of either gender - who are considering becoming parents. Part health fair and part party, the event will feature music from station 92Q, and radio personality Sonjay DeCaires will emcee.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 6, 2013
It didn't take long to see why a retired city public schools teacher is hailed by her neighbors as Miss Auchentoroly or, to others, the Clean Up Lady. Barbara Anderson-Dandy is one of those Baltimore community dynamos who say they work behind the scenes - and do. It's just that they never stop working, and along the way have established a reservoir of good will. She says she loves the challenge of stewarding a highly visible city neighborhood perched at the edge of Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
February 14, 1995
A recent consultants' report details the many things desperately needed in Druid Hill Park. It also urges that the managers of this 740-acre oasis should capitalize on the park's relationship with the Baltimore Zoo, which occupies 180-acres of the land. Now it is up to city officials to implement the recommendations.Since the consultants' report is largely silent on the costs of all the recommendations, it is illustrative to consider how Druid Hill Park came about, 137 years ago. Although Baltimore was a rapidly growing city in those days, it had no readily available cash to buy a park.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 28, 2013
For nearly 20 years, I watched a landmark stone house deteriorate. Once one of the proudest addresses in the city, the home of the Druid Hill Park superintendent and later the Maryland Zoo director became vacant. Trees began growing through its windows after its slate roof collapsed. Its stout stone walls were tumbling down. Sitting on a rise at the western edge of the city park, it became a symbol of neglect, an example of what can go wrong within city government. Then, about a year ago, this depressing situation began to change.
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