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By Antero Pietila | June 15, 1996
A STRETCH OF York Road in Govans, near the intersection with Woodbourne Avenue, illustrates an important trend in Baltimore retailing. Rite Aid has long had a big store at one corner. Now, its rivals Revco and CVS are feverishly building even bigger stores nearby.All these companies are on a huge expansion binge in Baltimore. Rite Aid, America's biggest drugstore chain, operates 54 branches here now but plans to add 40 more by the end of next year. Revco also has resumed aggressive expansion in the city after its takeover by Rite Aid fell through earlier this year.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
Johns Hopkins Medicine and Walgreens are collaborating on a new drugstore that is expected to open by the end of the year in East Baltimore, the partners announced Thursday. "We'll hopefully use the store to develop programs, deliver them to the community and then expand" the programs to other Walgreens stores, said Mark Shaver, senior director of business development and strategic alliances for Hopkins Medicine. The pharmacy chain and the Hopkins health system see the partnership as an opportunity to develop clinical and health care resource practices that can be implemented at Walgreens locations throughout the United States.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Nicholas Gus Lambros, a Greek immigrant who in the early 1900s began a string of successful Baltimore businesses -- including several drugstores -- died Tuesday of heart failure at the Hart Heritage nursing home in Street. He was 98.Knowing no English, Mr. Lambros came to Baltimore in about 1915, his ship having landed at Ellis Island, N.Y., part of a wave of Greeks seeking a new life in the United States.Along with his father and two brothers who had earlier come to the city, he ran a street-corner peanut stand -- which generated the money to open the first of five drugstores throughout the city.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
As president of the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its over 900 member physicians statewide, I am writing to express support for Dr. Jeffrey Cain's concerns surrounding pharmacy based clinics in your article, "The drugstore clinics debate" and their impact on patient centered medical homes. When children are seen in pharmacy based clinics, they are intrinsically not receiving the level of care provided by the child's primary care doctor. The medical home is best described as a model or philosophy of primary care that is patient-centered, comprehensive, team-based, coordinated, accessible and focused on quality and safety.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 15, 1998
CAMP HILL, Pa. -- Rite Aid Corp., the nation's third-largest drugstore chain, said its second-quarter profit rose 34 percent on increased prescription-drug sales.Profit before a charge rose to $81.2 million, or 31 cents a diluted share, from $60.6 million, or 24 cents, a year ago.Rite Aid said its profit was boosted by a strong demand for prescription drugs, which accounted for 53.4 percent of total sales. In last year's quarter, prescription drugs accounted for 50.3 percent of sales.Sales for the quarter ended Aug. 29 rose 14 percent, to $3.01 billion from $2.63 billion last year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2010
Wesley Nathaniel Shelton, a retired pharmacist who had co-owned four drugstores, died July 26 of sarcoidosis and cardiovascular disease at his West Baltimore home. He was 75. Mr. Shelton, the son of a Bethlehem steelworker and a homemaker, was born in Blackstone, Va., and moved with his family to West Baltimore in the early 1940s. He was a 1951 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and earned his pharmacy degree in 1955 from Howard University. Mr. Shelton served as an Army pharmacist from 1957 to 1959.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1998
Snyder Communications Inc., a developer of marketing programs for large companies, agreed yesterday to buy NRS Inc. for $24.4 million in stock to strengthen its services to pharmacies and drugstores nationwide.Bethesda-based Snyder said the acquisition of NRS will be accounted for as a pooling of interests and may add slightly to 1998 and 1999 earnings. It had 1997 sales of $333.4 million.Closely held NRS, based in Danbury, Conn., provides marketing services to more than 13,000 pharmacies and drugstores and 7,000 retailers in the United States.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1998
CVS/pharmacy has completed its conversion of 40 Revco drugstores in the Baltimore region, making CVS the area's second-largest pharmacy retailer.The conversion is part of the Rhode Island retailer's national plan to convert 2,600 Revco stores to the CVS name by the end of the year. CVS bought Revco D. S. Inc. in May.Renovated stores have wider aisles, brighter lights, wall-to-wall carpeting and redesigned layouts.The purchase of the former Revcos boosted CVS from fourth place to second in the Baltimore area, behind Rite Aid Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Rite Aid Corp.'s $1.8 billion bid to buy Revco D. S. Inc. in history's biggest drugstore merger has hit a rough stretch of road at the Federal Trade Commission.Rite Aid yesterday extended its Revco tender offer for the fourth time and said the FTC's continuing antitrust review caused the delay. The agency is looking at whether a merger that joins more than 4,800 drugstores would hurt competition and raise prices.The FTC this week took the unusual step of naming trustees to sell several Rite Aid and Revco drugstores, after the companies had trouble disposing of pharmacies that the FTC ordered them to sell because of antitrust concerns about earlier mergers.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
Jack Eckerd Corp., the Florida-based drugstore company that had seemed on the brink of taking over the bankrupt Revco D.S. Inc. chain, retreated today in the face of a determined defense by Revco management.Eckerd said it would "postpone indefinitely consideration of its plan of reorganization for Revco" and let a management-supported plan go forward for confirmation by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Akron, Ohio. In return, Twinsburg, Ohio-based Revco agreed to pay Eckerd $7.5 million to cover expenses it incurred in its takeover bid.Stewart Turley, chairman of Eckerd, cited "significant additional costs" and delays that would have resulted if his company kept up the fight.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
Developers of the $150 million Lexington Square project planned for Baltimore's west side cleared a key hurdle Tuesday when Baltimore's preservation commission voted to give preliminary approval to a plan to save two exterior walls of the former Read's drugstore as part of the project, rather than requiring preservation of the entire structure. After hearing more than three hours of testimony, the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, or CHAP, voted 9-1 to accept a plan from Lexington Square Partners and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to save the north and west facades of the former Read's building, the site of a 1955 lunch counter sit-in.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
Defying Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake and city redevelopment officials, Baltimore's preservation commission voted Tuesday to add the former Read's drugstore to the city's "special list" of landmarks, an action that protects the building from demolition for at least six months. Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation voted 7-1 to grant temporary landmark status to the city-owned building because it was the site of a 1955 lunch counter sit-in that had national significance in the U.S. civil rights movement.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2011
About 60 members from two local chapters of the Service Employees International Union held a rally Thursday afternoon at Howard and Lexington streets to support efforts to save the old Read's drugstore building, the site of a 1955 lunch counter sit-in by African-American college students. Preservationists and civil rights groups want to save the building as a landmark, while an out-of-town developer seeks to raze the structure to make way for a $150 million development. The protestors came from SEIU Local 1199, Maryland's largest health care union, and Local 32BJ, representing building service workers.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
In January 1955, Morgan State College students staged an impromptu sit-in at the lunch counter of the Read's drugstore at Howard and Lexington streets in Baltimore, demanding that African-Americans be served. Their protest, along with others at local Read's stores, worked: That month, the retail chain began serving all patrons, black and white, at all of its 37 Baltimore-area lunch counters. But the students' victory has been largely overlooked in the annals of U.S. civil rights history, in part because it was not photographed or widely reported by the mainstream news media.
NEWS
January 25, 2011
As a person who as a teenager marched alongside people like Rep. John Lewis and Diane Nash to successfully integrate lunch-counters in Nashville, Tenn., the issue of whether Read's drugstore in downtown Baltimore's West Side, which was the site of historic civil rights sit-ins, should be preserved is a poignant one for me. ( "Seeking guidance on west-side project," Jan. 25). I view the current controversy from several perspectives. During the more than one-third of a century that I have lived in Maryland, I have been given multiple gubernatorial appointments to serve on this state's Commission of African-American History and Culture and am a past chairman of the Commission to Coordinate the Study, Commemoration and Impact of Slavery's History and Legacy in Maryland.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | January 14, 2011
There is a new argument as to why the old flagship Read's drugstore in downtown Baltimore must be preserved. I've long argued that the No. 1 of the chain, at Howard and Lexington streets, is an overlooked 1934 architectural gem. Now historians of the civil rights movement in Baltimore have shown the role this building played in the desegregation of 1950s Baltimore. In 1955, after listening to the members of the Baltimore Committee on Racial Equality, the owners of the Read Drug and Chemical Co. gave the word that as of mid-January, all persons, regardless of race, could be seated and served at its soda fountains and lunch counters.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
Drugstore giant Rite Aid Corp. said yesterday that it agreed to buy Perry Drug Stores Inc., Michigan's biggest pharmacy chain, for about $132 million in cash.The deal would add 224 stores to the 2,600 Rite Aid operates and about $735 million in sales to Rite Aid's revenue of $4 billion.Yesterday's announcement came as part of a continuing trend toward consolidation in the retail pharmacy industry that is not likely to end soon, analysts said.Drugstores are under intense pressure from cost-cutting health insurers on one side and large discounters, such as Wal-Mart and Kmart, on the other.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
Rite Aid Corp., beset by rising costs and falling stock prices, will likely try to sell some or all of its West Coast drugstores but is not expected to attempt to shed the entire chain, analysts said yesterday.Speculation about a possible sale of all or a portion of the Camp Hill, Pa.-based retailer continued yesterday, a day after the company said it was in discussions about "possible corporate transactions.""If consummated, [the transactions] would be material," the statement said. "There can be no assurance as to the outcome of these discussions."
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Civil rights and preservation leaders in Baltimore voiced strong objections Wednesday to a developer's proposal to raze part of downtown's Superblock, warning that the city would lose a priceless link to its past. The plan by Lexington Square Partners calls for demolition of the former Read's drugstore, a vacant, city-owned building at the southeast corner of Howard and Lexington streets. According to historians, that store was the site of an early civil rights protest in which Morgan College students staged a sit-in on Jan. 20, 1955.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 26, 2010
My family did not patronize Baltimore's suburban shopping centers in the days after Thanksgiving. We were downtown people and adhered to the customs of the day. I watched the old Hochschild-Kohn Toytown Parade from the curb at Maryland Avenue and 29th Street; a night or two later, we drove downtown while the stores were closed and took in the window displays. Finally, days later, we might begin Christmas shopping, possibly with a breakfast at the Read's drugstore, one of the anchors of the busy Howard and Lexington corner.
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