Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDrugs And Violence
IN THE NEWS

Drugs And Violence

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
With a bling-bedecked NBA star at his side, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. charged yesterday into the home turf of his likely rival in the next gubernatorial race to announce a media campaign that condemns the drugs and violence plaguing Baltimore's streets. Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony, who grew up in Baltimore, was with the governor to make amends for appearing in Stop Snitching, a documentary featuring gun-toting drug dealers who urge people not to cooperate with police. He said he had no idea that footage of him "chillin'" with friends would end up on such a DVD. But Anthony, 20, may have become an unwitting player once again - this time in a heated political contest between Ehrlich and Mayor Martin O'Malley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | April 18, 2008
The city liquor board will not renew the license for the owner of Linden Bar and Liquors, a long-time corner establishment in the 900 block of W. North Ave. that police say is the scene of nightly drug activity and violence. Residents of nearby Reservoir Hill flooded the hearing at City Hall yesterday and were relieved at the board's decision. But the attorney for Chang K. Yim, who has owned the liquor store since 2003, argued that his client could be a victim of gentrification, and that Kim has tried to appease neighborhood fears by installing lights outside the store and fixing video cameras inside the building.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
Jerome McCardell pleaded guilty yesterday to killing a man in December 1991, when he was just 17. So much in his life has changed since then, save for a constant revealed by his criminal records and in court documents: drugs and violence. McCardell was known in the early 1990s on the streets of Baltimore as MAC-10, a kind of gun. About the time of the murder, he became a father and, as part of a rap group called Young Black Mafia, released a cassette tape. He posed thuggishly in a promotional photo, aiming a .45-caliber handgun topped with a laser.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,Sun reporter | August 26, 2007
When police officers burst into a West Baltimore Street rowhouse on a hot August afternoon, their target was a suspected drug dealer, and the raid yielded a stash of cocaine, heroin gel caps and marijuana. But they found much more: a loaded revolver as well as two pit bull terriers and the weights, chains, homemade harness and other equipment that are telltale signs of dogfighting. That volatile mix - drugs, guns and dogfighting - has fueled a deadly subculture that is tearing at some city neighborhoods, police, animal enforcement and health officials say. Pit bulls, or "pits" as they are commonly called, are prized by drug dealers and other criminals for their loyalty, muscular beauty and aggressive nature, a characteristic that can be manipulated to sadistic extremes.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
Members of the Eastern Shore's African-American community returned from Monday's Million Man March filled with a spirit of exhilaration.But that emotional high was dampened with the news the next day that a Maryland state trooper had been shot and killed in their community, and two black men were charged in the crime.Troubled by the violent act and its repercussions, the Wicomico County NAACP is calling on members of the African-American community, particularly those who attended the march in Washington, to assemble on the steps of Salisbury's city hall today before the funeral for the trooper, Tfc. Edward A. Plank, as a sign of respect for his family and to stand against drugs and violence.
NEWS
November 22, 1994
"Operation Southside," the weekend's massive raid against drugs and violence, was the seventh sweep the police department has conducted since Thomas C. Frazier became Baltimore's top cop nearly a year ago.It would be naive to suggest that these kinds of raids -- which were sorely lacking under Commissioner Edward Woods -- will run drug lords out of the city altogether. More accurate is to describe these periodic sweeps as armed propaganda: The police department is taking a stand and telling addicts and traffickers that the days of unhindered open-air drug markets are over.
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | July 2, 1991
To protest the city's soaring murder rate, a local minister is seeking volunteers for a human chain to stretch through drug-infested neighborhoods in East and West Baltimore.The chain would extend from the intersection of East North Avenue and Milton Street to Hilton Avenue and West North Avenue -- 5.5 miles. The Rev. Willie E. Ray, the head of Save Another Youth Inc., said the event would be held as a protest against drug-related violence.Ray said the human chain would form July 28 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Two previous attempts to form human chains from Milton Street to Hilton Street have been unsuccessful, Ray said.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson and Robert Hilson,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
The nation's cities are "urban mortuaries" for black families and drugs are the "embalming fluid" that prevents addicts from understanding the depth of their social, economic, physical and mental plight, a prison administrator has told participants in a substance abuse conference at Coppin State College.The devastation caused by addiction is highly evident in the black communities, where it has become the "Pied Piper" of crime, LaMont W. Flanagan, commissioner of the Baltimore City Detention Center, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
Dr. Norman A. Handy Sr., city councilman from Southwest Baltimore's 6th District, said his barber does business near the Francis M. Wood Alternative High School at Calhoun and Fayette streets.So he knows how far the walk to City Hall was for a group of students who marched through downtown in chilly weather yesterday to protest drugs and violence.After talking to the group of 38 students at City Hall, he said he was impressed by the effort of Students Helping Other People (SHOP)."To organize this and put it together, and to be here is significant in terms of the challenges they face in other areas of life," Handy said.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson and Robert Hilson,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
The nation's cities are "urban mortuaries" for black families and drugs are the "embalming fluid" that prevents addicts from understanding the depth of their social, economic, physical and mental plight, a prison administrator yesterday told participants in a substance abuse conference at Coppin State College.The devastation caused by addiction is highly evident in the black communities where it has become the "Pied Piper" of crime, said LaMont W. Flanagan, commissioner of the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
Jerome McCardell pleaded guilty yesterday to killing a man in December 1991, when he was just 17. So much in his life has changed since then, save for a constant revealed by his criminal records and in court documents: drugs and violence. McCardell was known in the early 1990s on the streets of Baltimore as MAC-10, a kind of gun. About the time of the murder, he became a father and, as part of a rap group called Young Black Mafia, released a cassette tape. He posed thuggishly in a promotional photo, aiming a .45-caliber handgun topped with a laser.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 25, 2005
A MAN in Federal Hill, one of Baltimore's great neighborhoods, expressed on WYPR-FM an attitude that a lot of people around here - in the city and surrounding counties - share, and many of us are tempted to embrace: Who cares if drug dealers kill each other? A lot of Baltimoreans can recite the oddly reassuring statistics, reported again yesterday in a Sun story about a longtime heroin addict who was shot to death in January: Between 80 and 85 percent of both homicide victims and suspects have criminal records, and most are involved in drugs.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
With a bling-bedecked NBA star at his side, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. charged yesterday into the home turf of his likely rival in the next gubernatorial race to announce a media campaign that condemns the drugs and violence plaguing Baltimore's streets. Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony, who grew up in Baltimore, was with the governor to make amends for appearing in Stop Snitching, a documentary featuring gun-toting drug dealers who urge people not to cooperate with police. He said he had no idea that footage of him "chillin'" with friends would end up on such a DVD. But Anthony, 20, may have become an unwitting player once again - this time in a heated political contest between Ehrlich and Mayor Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
YOU WON'T SEE any scaffolding around the corner of East North Avenue and Chester Street, or hear the whir of power saws or the thwack of a hammer driving nails through a two-by-four. The signs of rebirth that are so evident in several Baltimore communities are nowhere to be found at this forlorn intersection, a grim crossroads where decay meets despair and hope is hard to find. Instead, garrulous and glassy-eyed men, apparently high on drink and dope, wander past boarded-up rowhouses; weeds on a vacant lot half a block away stand shoulder-high; a discarded tire and a pile of empty chip bags, and soda and beer bottles have turned a nearby alley into a dumping ground.
NEWS
January 4, 2003
IN THE DAYS that followed the holocaust on East Preston Street - as he held his own newborn son - Mayor Martin O'Malley repeatedly asked himself: What could have been done? How could we have saved Angela Dawson, her husband and five children? "Everything and nothing," he told a throng of mourners standing in front of the charred death chamber a few days after the fire. The choice remains for this city as it enters a new year. We could always have done more in a poor neighborhood threatened by the drug trade, the mayor was saying.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2001
Thursday night's shooting barrage in West Baltimore that left two men dead, two others wounded and a street littered with shell casings was the third burst of violence to hit Harlem Park and neighboring Poppleton this week. One man was killed Wednesday and another Sunday in the 800 block of Vine St., six blocks south of Thursday's shootings, which occurred in the 900 block of Edmondson Ave., just north of U.S. 40. Detectives said yesterday that they had not established motives in any of the cases, though the shootings occurred in areas described by police as drug-infested.
NEWS
January 3, 1991
The biggest question about Maryland's new random drug testing policy is, in three words: Is it constitutional? Requiring employees arbitrarily to submit urine samples is an issue the Supreme Court has not yet decided. But when the state embarks on testing this month, the bottom line will be: Will it work? And the answer is, that depends.In part it depends on whether people will fully participate. Under the new policy, 13,000 state employees who hold safety-related jobs will be subject to the test.
NEWS
January 4, 2003
IN THE DAYS that followed the holocaust on East Preston Street - as he held his own newborn son - Mayor Martin O'Malley repeatedly asked himself: What could have been done? How could we have saved Angela Dawson, her husband and five children? "Everything and nothing," he told a throng of mourners standing in front of the charred death chamber a few days after the fire. The choice remains for this city as it enters a new year. We could always have done more in a poor neighborhood threatened by the drug trade, the mayor was saying.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Tim Craig and Peter Hermann and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1999
It has gone beyond the daily echoes of gunfire and the lines of addicts who stagger up Gusryan Street looking to cop their next cap of crack. That has been going on so long in the O'Donnell Heights housing project that it has become a way of life.What frustrates people is the loss of simple amenities. The phones often die because dealers cut the lines to prevent calls to police. Cable television goes out because the outside boxes are pried open to hide cocaine. The streets are dark because the lights get shot out."
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Children at summer camp in Malcolm X Elementary School emerge at 9 a.m. and begin their 30-second dash into Park Heights' Towanda Park with smiles that say it's recess time.They bolt to their normal spots with such energy that the few middle-aged stragglers shaking off the previous night's drug binge scurry into nearby overgrown woods.The men glance back at the apparent chaos, leaving behind a park that reflects the Northwest Baltimore community's decline from middle-class brick rowhouses to streets peppered with crack cocaine and violence.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.