Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDrug War
IN THE NEWS

Drug War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 8, 2011
As a retired detective, I heartily agree with the Neill Franklin that the "war on drugs" has been a dysfunctional, disastrous policy without benefit ("Save a cop: End the drug war," March 7). Worse, because my colleagues spend so much time chasing drug offenders, we are missing the animals who hurt women and children. Detectives flying around in helicopters are not arresting the pedophiles in Internet chat rooms. Officers searching a car for pot miss the deadly drunk drivers who sail past those stops.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
If Len Bias could attend his own Hall of Fame ceremony on Friday , he'd do so as a 50-year-old man. That's a heck of a thing to wrap your head around if, like me, you grew up as an obsessed ACC basketball fan in the 1980s. Lenny has lived as an idea about what could have been for so long, it's strange to think of him as an actual person. Every generation has its touchstones. For my parents, it was the Kennedy assassination. People my age remember watching from their elementary school classrooms as the Challenger exploded and later on, 9/11.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bradley C. Schreiber | November 11, 2009
T he window of opportunity to bring down drug trafficking organizations in Central and South America is quickly shrinking. However, despite its recent efforts, the Obama administration still lacks the one thing that we desperately need to win the fight against the cartels: a strategy. While it may seem like an obvious thing to have, the United States surprisingly lacks a comprehensive plan to bring down drug trafficking organizations. The federal government does have some counterdrug strategies, but they are either too broad - like the annual National Drug Control Strategy, which reads more like an "accomplishment report" of past successes rather than a "how to" manual - or too narrowly focused, like the National Southwest Border Counternarcotics Strategy, which addresses, among other things, ways to strengthen security along the border itself.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
In The Sun article "New views about crime" (May 25) the writers failed to mention the Libertarian approach to the failed war on drugs. As the Libertarian candidate for attorney general, my main campaign theme is to end the drug war. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. We have more people in prison than Russia and China combined! At the same time we have the highest rate of drug usage in the world. A definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect a different result.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
Regarding Dan Rodricks ' commentary on drugs at the city detention center, don't opinion columnists belong on the op-ed page, not in the news section ("Scandal at jail another symptom of war on drugs," April 27)? Mr. Rodricks blames a large share of crime and corruption on the drug war, and he advocates for decriminalizing or legalizing marijuana, cocaine and heroin. That would lead to a world of addicted people roaming the streets and driving cars in a drug-induced haze, with no motivation to work or be productive members of their families or of society.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
The legacy of Prohibition, if Ken Burns is to be believed, is a system of organized crime not only empowered by that ill-fated law but so greatly enriched as to have become "too big to fail. " Kevin Sabet rightly, though grudgingly, concludes that America's current effort to incarcerate our way out of an intractable drug problem may be ever-so-slightly misguided ("Drug legalization: Wrong lesson of Prohibition," Oct. 9), but he has little to say about alternatives. He says nothing about the money trail, either in the liquor trade or in the drug trade.
NEWS
October 12, 2013
Retired state police captain Leigh Maddox is absolutely right about Gov. Martin O'Malley's misplaced emphasis on law enforcement ( "O'Malley is wrong: More arrests mean more crime," Oct. 7). When it comes to drugs, an increase in arrests could actually increase crime. Attempts to limit supply while drug demand remains constant only increase the profitability of trafficking. For addictive drugs like heroin, a spike in street prices leads desperate addicts to increase their criminal activity to feed desperate habits.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
Mike Gimbel's letter ignores some rudimentary facts regarding medical marijuana ("Md. wouldn't be able to control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 4). Many polls have recently showed that as many as eight out of every 10 Americans say they want medical marijuana to be legalized and regulated. Unlike Mr. Gimbel, they understand that giving needed treatment to sick people needs to take precedence over the politics and misguided taboos of the past. Fourteen states already have medical marijuana, and the reason that many more have legislation pending is because for some severely ill patients, the treatment works.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Over the weekend, Baltimore Sun magazine published excerpts from a Q&A with Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III. After five years of talking to bad guys with guns, features editor Sam Sessa got him to dish on some more light-hearted topics such as his favorite music and his solo hike on the Appalachian Trail. You can read that interview here .  But Sam and the outgoing commissioner also talked the war on drugs, "The Wire," and his decision to retire. Here's what was left on the cutting room floor: You were a drug cop. What do you think about the push to decriminalize marijuana?
NEWS
By Neill Franklin | March 7, 2011
Several thousand miles, and a comparable cultural divide, separate Elkins, W.Va., from San Luis Potosi, Mexico. But recently, they became sister cities of a grim sort when law enforcement professionals lost their lives fighting America's longest, most costly and least winnable war: the so-called "war on drugs. " On Highway 57, halfway between Monterrey and Mexico City, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Special Agent Jaime Zapata died when cartel gunmen ambushed the car carrying him and a colleague, who was wounded.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Not long after Neill Franklin stepped behind a lectern in Annapolis to argue for making marijuana legal, the retired law enforcement officer was fighting tears again. It happens all the time - whenever he pauses to think of the futility of the war on drugs and the lives he says have been wasted. "We've been at this forever," he said. "It never worked. " As a broadening coalition pushes to legalize marijuana in Maryland this year, advocates have turned to Franklin to help sell the idea.
NEWS
October 12, 2013
Retired state police captain Leigh Maddox is absolutely right about Gov. Martin O'Malley's misplaced emphasis on law enforcement ( "O'Malley is wrong: More arrests mean more crime," Oct. 7). When it comes to drugs, an increase in arrests could actually increase crime. Attempts to limit supply while drug demand remains constant only increase the profitability of trafficking. For addictive drugs like heroin, a spike in street prices leads desperate addicts to increase their criminal activity to feed desperate habits.
NEWS
By Leigh Maddox | October 7, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has recently made the case for beefing up law enforcement to battle this year's rise in crime, including in an op-ed in The Sun. "So long as levels of enforcement continue to decline," he argued, "shootings and homicides will continue to go up. " This argument overlooks the way an emphasis on enforcement prevents this city from tackling violent crime. In fact, over-enforcement has the opposite effect and renders crime more pernicious in the communities that are most affected.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 15, 2013
It's been a war on justice, an assault on equal protection under the law. And a war on families, removing millions of fathers from millions of homes. And a war on money, spilling it like water. And a war on people of color, targeting them with drone strike efficiency. We never call it any of those things, though all of them fit. No, we call it the War on Drugs. It is a 42-year, trillion-dollar disaster that has done nothing -- underscore that: absolutely nothing -- to stem the inexhaustible supply of, and insatiable demand for, illegal narcotics.
NEWS
By Neill Franklin | June 17, 2013
Thirteen years ago, Cpl. Ed Toatley was working undercover for the Maryland State Police when he was murdered during a botched drug deal in Washington, D.C. Ed was a close friend of mine, and his tragic death Oct. 30, 2000, began my quest to end America's longest war, the failed war on drugs. That quest led me to the newly formed Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), an international nonprofit organization for law enforcement professionals embarking on journeys similar to mine, where I have served as executive director for the past three years.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
Regarding Dan Rodricks ' commentary on drugs at the city detention center, don't opinion columnists belong on the op-ed page, not in the news section ("Scandal at jail another symptom of war on drugs," April 27)? Mr. Rodricks blames a large share of crime and corruption on the drug war, and he advocates for decriminalizing or legalizing marijuana, cocaine and heroin. That would lead to a world of addicted people roaming the streets and driving cars in a drug-induced haze, with no motivation to work or be productive members of their families or of society.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 15, 2012
I have something for you. In June 2010, I wrote in this space about a book, "The New Jim Crow," by Michelle Alexander, which I called a "troubling and profoundly necessary" work. Ms. Alexander promulgated an explosive argument. Namely, that the so-called "War on Drugs" amounts to a war on African-American men and, more to the point, to a racial caste system nearly as restrictive, oppressive and omnipresent as Jim Crow itself. This because, although white Americans are far and away the nation's biggest dealers and users of illegal drugs, African-Americans are far and away the ones most likely to be jailed for drug crimes.
NEWS
March 16, 1999
This is an excerpt of a New York Times editorial that was published on Saturday:ALMOST 70 years after the failure of Prohibition, the much-trumpeted "war on drugs," begun more than a decade ago, has hugely misfired.The drug war was created in reaction to a wave of urban violence triggered by crack cocaine that ignited fears that crack addiction might spread widely. Surveys now show, however, that the use of crack, by about 600,000 people annually, has not changed in 10 years. Nor has the general level of illegal drug use.The best hope for controlling illicit drugs lies in treatment.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein on Monday reached out to the black community by answering call-in questions on WOLB's Larry Young Morning Show about his controversial decision to not prosecute the three Baltimore police officers involved in the death of East Baltimore resident Anthony Anderson. On Thursday, Bernstein said his office had determined that Detective Todd A. Strohman used appropriate action when he tackled Anderson during a September drug arrest that resulted in broken ribs and a lacerated spleen, which killed the 46-year-old man. Officers said Anderson was attempting to swallow drugs while walking away from them, which caused Strohman to use a “bear hug” to take him to the ground and preserve evidence.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
If the goal of marijuana prohibition is to subsidize Mexican drug cartels, prohibition is a success ("The nonsense of marijuana busts shown," Nov. 11). The drug war distorts supply and demand dynamics so that big money grows on little trees. There is a reason you don't see drug cartels sneaking into national forests to cultivate tomatoes and cucumbers. They cannot compete with legitimate farmers. If the goal of marijuana prohibition is to deter use, prohibition is a failure. The United States has double the rate of marijuana use as the Netherlands, where marijuana is legally available.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.