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By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2007
City Council president candidate Michael Sarbanes will unveil today his crime-fighting strategy, which includes shifting from specialized units to neighborhood patrols, salary increases for officers of 6 percent to 8 percent, and more money for drug treatment programs. "I feel a huge sense of urgency around this," said Sarbanes. "We can't as a city fall into a deadly trap of low expectations where we think that ... `Well, we just are a violent city and that's just the way things are.' Things can get much safer in neighborhoods."
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NEWS
September 14, 2014
State officials are hoping a new public health initiative to track the distribution and sale of highly addictive prescription drugs in Maryland can help reduce the number of people who abuse such medications. The initiative, inspired by a program originally developed in Kentucky 15 years ago, has led to a drastic drop in prescription drug abuse there, and it has the potential to become an important element in Maryland's overall effort to reduce overdose deaths from both legal and illegal drugs.
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NEWS
June 28, 1998
White people find their niche in the inner cityI enjoyed your article about the county residents who come into the inner city to buy their drugs.And Gregory Kane's viewpoint of the issues was most thought provoking as well as entertaining.Who says the inner city has nothing the rich, white preppies want?What I found particularly offensive was the smug attitude of the suburbanites.They all came off like a bunch of whiny, spoiled brats. Blaming their drug habits on the inner city seems to be putting the cart before the horse.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Maryland prosecutors are concerned that the new law eliminating criminal penalties for possessing small amounts of marijuana will result in an increase in "drugged driving" that police are ill-equipped to handle. "It is inevitable that there will be an increase in drugged driving in Maryland," Montgomery County State's Attorney John McCarthy said. "We'd better be ready. " Maryland's decriminalization law, which makes possession of small amounts of marijuana a civil violation, takes effect Oct. 1. Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger and other prosecutors wanted state legislators to delay passing the law until such consequences could be better studied in Colorado and Washington, where voters legalized marijuana use in 2012.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2001
It's Friday morning, and Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore's health commissioner, is sitting at the head of a conference table, flipping through pages of statistics. Nervous directors of city drug treatment programs sit around the table and wait for the interrogation. Today's first target is Total Health Care Inc., an outpatient program near Charles Street and North Avenue. Beilenson wants to know why the program's retention rate - how long people stay in treatment - has dropped. Six months ago, 94 percent of the people were still there after the first month of treatment, now 83 percent are. "What's going on?"
NEWS
March 17, 2005
IN BALTIMORE, nearly one in five black men 20 to 30 years old is in prison, and more than half are under the control of the criminal justice system - in prison, on parole or on probation. Those grim statistics are contained in a report released this week by the Justice Policy Institute, a Washington-based research organization. Since most of these offenders are somehow involved in drugs and the drug trade, the report serves as yet another reminder that more treatment and less imprisonment would be a better approach to the city's crime and social problems.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Baltimore may believe, but the Baltimore County Council has its doubts. Asked at its meeting Monday night to support the high-profile Baltimore Believe anti-drug campaign in the city with a $5,000 grant, the council refused, saying the advertisements and billboards are a waste of money that could be better used on drug treatment programs. Yesterday, County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger scrambled to get the three councilmen who voted against the grant to change their minds, acknowledging that he had made a mistake in not explaining its importance thoroughly.
NEWS
February 8, 1992
A shootout in the Murphy Homes project Monday night dramatized the out-of-control nature of the city's drug crisis. Two plainclothes officers, responding to a tip, entered a fifth-floor hallway and identified themselves. They were met by a hail of .357 Magnum shots. The officers survived unhurt, but the shooter died and four other people were wounded in the fusillade of return fire.That shootout, and the alleged drug dealing which provoked it, involved adults, as did a Christmas 1991 incident which killed two women.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The fourth annual Will Barrow Memorial Flag Football Tournament will be held Saturday at Virginia's historic Lambeth Field with proceeds going to the UVa HELP Line, a nonprofit, student-run crisis hotline. Play is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Established in memory of Barrow, a former Cavaliers defensive midfielder who was found dead of an apparent suicide in November 2008, the UVa HELP Line is an anonymous, confidential telephone service for residents of Charlottesville, Albemarle County and the University of Virginia.
NEWS
March 17, 1992
There is no conclusive evidence that abuse of narcotic prescription drugs is out of control in Maryland. There is, however, evidence that many Americans are undermedicated for pain. A federal study recently urged doctors to pay more attention to adequate pain relief for patients after surgery. The problem is also acute among cancer patients. Why, then, is the state health department planning to spend $500,000 to create a new bureaucracy to monitor prescriptions of drugs that have sound medical uses but a high potential for abuse?
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The fourth annual Will Barrow Memorial Flag Football Tournament will be held Saturday at Virginia's historic Lambeth Field with proceeds going to the UVa HELP Line, a nonprofit, student-run crisis hotline. Play is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Established in memory of Barrow, a former Cavaliers defensive midfielder who was found dead of an apparent suicide in November 2008, the UVa HELP Line is an anonymous, confidential telephone service for residents of Charlottesville, Albemarle County and the University of Virginia.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
Mayoral challenger Otis Rolley visited the block where a 91-year-old woman was stabbed to death this week to charge that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake lacks a "real plan" to reduce crime. "Instead of providing leadership or proposing a real plan to make every neighborhood safer, she's running campaign commercials touting a drop in crime that began under another mayor," Rolley said Friday, outside Northeast Middle School. "She knows crime is too high, and she has no plan to make us safer.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
Purnell Parker remembers when his drug addiction was so bad that he ate nothing but peanut brittle for an entire summer because he was broke. But for more than a year, Parker has not used drugs. The 38-year-old Baltimore man wears a medallion that serves as a symbol of his recovery and to remind him of his new life - along with a seemingly perpetual smile. And after getting the upper hand on his dependency, he says, he is resolved to help others facing the same struggle. "When I was using, if you couldn't tell me where the next best corner was, I didn't have [anything]
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2007
City Council president candidate Michael Sarbanes will unveil today his crime-fighting strategy, which includes shifting from specialized units to neighborhood patrols, salary increases for officers of 6 percent to 8 percent, and more money for drug treatment programs. "I feel a huge sense of urgency around this," said Sarbanes. "We can't as a city fall into a deadly trap of low expectations where we think that ... `Well, we just are a violent city and that's just the way things are.' Things can get much safer in neighborhoods."
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | March 1, 2007
Maryland's inmate health care system faced staffing shortages last year, and plans stalled for drug treatment programs and a new electronic database to keep better track of records, a state audit released yesterday showed. Auditors from the Office of Legislative Audits noted "several significant areas of noncompliance" that affected inmate medical services at facilities across the state, including Baltimore's Central Booking and Intake Center and the city jail, according to the report.
NEWS
October 28, 2006
Council acts to ease access to treatment The City Council took a very positive step toward improving the health and safety of our communities when it gave preliminary approval to a bill that would amend city zoning laws that make it difficult, if not impossible, to open or expand outpatient drug treatment programs in Baltimore ("More drug treatment centers," editorial, Oct. 26). Current city zoning laws compel all drug treatment programs - even those with long histories of success in Baltimore - to get legislation enacted in order to open an office, move or expand.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
Eighty-five percent of the crimes reported in Anne Arundel County last year were drug-related, a fact that has renewed the old debate of whether treating drug addicts is more effective than jailing them for the crimes they commit to support their habits."
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center has closed its well-regarded drug detoxification center and is expanding its methadone treatment program, a move that reflects a shift in the city's drug treatment policy. Hundreds of addicts were weaned off of drugs during stays of 10 days to two weeks at the detox center. But city drug treatment officials say the unit did not adequately meet the needs of the city's hardcore addicts, many of whom require more support than detoxification. They also say public dollars would be better spent on long-term drug treatment, which can last up to a year and includes services such as methadone maintenance, counseling, job training and the use of buprenorphine, a prescription drug that cuts clients' craving for heroin.
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