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By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | September 29, 1993
A Baltimore drug-treatment program that was investigated for financial improprieties earlier this year apparently will be denied renewal of a federal grant.The Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems, a quasi-public organization, has been operating for three years under a $13 million grant from the federal Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, under a program called Target Cities.But Dr. Peter Beilenson, Baltimore health commissioner, says the city has been notified informally that its application for another $3.4 million has been denied.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
The developer says his planned center for heroin addicts in a North Baltimore neighborhood would be revolutionary: a primary care facility that would treat all aspects of addict's lives, not just dole out methadone. But Harwood residents see it as more of the same for a community they say is already filled with people bused in for addiction services. More addicts, they say, lead to more public urination, drug use and crime. "When the lifeboat is full, the next person being worthy doesn't make it any less likely to sink," said Joe McNeely, president of a neighborhood coalition opposed to the center.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | February 9, 2010
It's been a busy year so far at Powell Recovery Center in Upper Fells Point. About 40 new clients have walked into the drug treatment center since the state expanded substance-abuse coverage for low-income Maryland residents Jan. 1. State officials hope that getting more addicts into treatment will ease a major backlog, especially in Baltimore. While some centers worry that the expansion will prove burdensome, Powell Recovery's president sees only an upside: He predicts his center will be able to serve more than 2,000 drug users this year, up from 1,500 last year.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
Mike Gimbel's letter about a harm-reduction program that trains people to administer the anti-overdose medication Narcan was based on an outdated, stereotypical description of drug addicts ( "Narcan won't solve the problem of addiction," June 23). While there may be many drug addicts who "aren't good parents and can't do an honest day's work," I have had the pleasure to know many addicts who go to work every day, are good parents to their children and would be considered contributing members of their community.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
As the federal government shifts its drug control strategy toward drug treatment and education initiatives, the U.S. drug czar said Wednesday at an event in Baltimore that he plans to emphasize the expansion of drug courts to divert nonviolent offenders to treatment instead of prison. Gil Kerlikowske, director of national drug control policy, announced the changes at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine as he laid out his goals for the year. The former Seattle police chief said there would be no official change in the federal stance that marijuana is an illegal and harmful drug, a hot issue since two states voted to allow its use last year.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr., a law-and-order Republican, has made drug treatment efforts a top priority of his administration. He has focused on putting nonviolent, drug-addicted offenders into treatment instead of jail, and offering treatment to prisoners before they return to the streets. But a key aspect of the administration's initiatives now before the Maryland General Assembly is in danger of being derailed by cost-cutting, shortsighted legislative budget analysts. Targeted for cuts is the administration's plan to enhance drug treatment and education programs for Maryland prisoners - a welcome reform of the prison system.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1997
Graham-Melvin Associates, Inc. has shut down its drug treatment clinic in the Oakwood Business Center on Oakland Mills Road in east Columbia, apparently because of financial problems.The company, which also closed a clinic at 2117 Maryland Ave. in Baltimore, has been under state scrutiny since April, when the state cut off funding to the program when auditors discovered the clinic might be overbilling Medicaid.In June in Howard Circuit Court, the clinic admitted bilking $95,000 from the Medicaid program by inflating hours spent with patients and billing for office visits that never happened.
NEWS
By Jeffrey A. Schaler | March 30, 2004
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY should reject Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s plan to enhance drug treatment and education programs. Drug users can pay for their own "treatment" if they really want help. They found the money to buy drugs, they can find the money to buy treatment. State funding for addiction treatment only helps addiction treatment providers. The most popular way of helping people with drug and alcohol problems is through free self-help programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and SMART Recovery.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | February 26, 1992
State officials will meet with Straight Inc. drug treatment clients and their parents today to discuss where the adolescents should continue their therapy in the wake of the program's unexpected closing.Meanwhile, a group of parents who were dissatisfied with Straight's management policies is hoping to start an independent program modeledafter Straight.The Columbia program, which is part of a national chain, will close Friday due to financial difficulties and a host of internal problems between the local program and Straight's corporate home office in Florida.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 14, 1992
Chrysalis House, one of the few rehabilitation programs in Maryland to treat pregnant women hooked on drugs, is expanding its services with a new 33-bed center in Crownsville.Unable to grow in Pasadena, the program has purchased six acres off Crownsville Road, behind Crownsville State Hospital, for a bigger facility. One wing in the new center will be reserved for pregnant women and women with young children."Our hope is to stop the cycle of addiction," said Carole Baker, head of the Anne Arundel County chapter of United Way and president of the Chrysalis House board of directors.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
Over the years I have tried to educate the public about the disease of addiction and how a drug addict thinks and makes decisions. Let me remind the readers that a drug addict only wants one thing and one thing only - more drugs, at all costs. A drug addict doesn't care about their health, they are not fearful of the police, they aren't good parents, they can't do a honest days work and they will do whatever is necessary to get their "fix. " Therefore traditional public health methods to reach addicts and convince them to stop using drugs will not work.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Days after the federal government abandoned plans to house immigrant children in a Baltimore office building, the Obama administration has begun to explore other sites in Maryland, including one in Prince George's County, documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun show. On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services evaluated a former residential drug treatment facility in Upper Marlboro with a storied past as the administration struggles to find enough shelter space to contain the recent surge in unaccompanied children crossing the nation's Southwest border.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
In The Sun article "New views about crime" (May 25) the writers failed to mention the Libertarian approach to the failed war on drugs. As the Libertarian candidate for attorney general, my main campaign theme is to end the drug war. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. We have more people in prison than Russia and China combined! At the same time we have the highest rate of drug usage in the world. A definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect a different result.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Possession of small amounts of marijuana would be treated as a civil offense rather than a crime under a bill that passed the Senate Friday. The vote was 36 to 8. The measure now goes to the House of Delegates, where similar legislation last year failed to get out of committee. Under the bill, anyone caught with 10 grams or less of the drug would be issued a civil citation and fined up to $100. Juveniles would be required to appear in court and could be ordered into drug treatment, as could adults receiving their third citation.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
As lawmakers in Annapolis continue to consider whether to loosen Maryland's marijuana laws, a bipartisan pair of senators plans to introduce a proposal Wednesday to decriminalize possession of small amounts of the drug. “We're not trying to encourage people to smoke pot,” said Baltimore County Democrat Sen. Bobby Zirkin, who is leading the effort. “I don't think that having a joint should be a jail-able offense. I don't think that's the definition of a crime.” Under the bill, it would not longer be a crime to have less than 10 grams of marijuana - a proposal that cleared the Senate last year but didn't get a vote in the House of Delegates.  Instead, the proposal calls for making marijuana a civil offense that could result in a ticket for adults and drug treatment for minors.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A Baltimore County councilwoman is seeking to tighten a local ban on synthetic marijuana, saying manufacturers have found ways around a state ban enacted last year as well as federal and county laws. Councilwoman Vicki Almond said existing laws against synthetic marijuana, often called K2 or Spice, only prohibit certain chemical compounds - and manufacturers can tweak formulas to make them legal. "These chemicals - they just change them so often that there's no way to keep up with naming the chemicals that are involved in this stuff," said Almond, who introduced the county legislation.
NEWS
By Peter L. Beilenson | July 5, 1999
ALTHOUGH The Sun's two-part editorial on drug treatment earlier this week was fraught with errors and serious misrepresentations, I was pleased to see two of the conclusions: Baltimore is on the right track in its efforts to get treatment to all who need it, and the organization created to oversee the publicly funded treatment system, Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems Inc. (BSAS), should remain.No doubt, Baltimore has a serious substance abuse problem. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and I realize that we cannot arrest our way out of the drug problem.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson has withdrawn a threat to cut $4 million in housing funds from the city's drug treatment program, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday.Henson, who sits on the board of Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems Inc., the agency created to coordinate drug treatment in the city, threatened this week to take back a portion of the organization's $33 million budget after becoming frustrated by what he called inaction in treating public housing addicts.Schmoke said yesterday that he met Wednesday with Henson and city Health Commissioner Peter L. Beilenson, who agreed to speed up the treating of city addicts.
NEWS
By Chris Beyrer | December 11, 2013
News that Congress reached a budget deal has been met with glee by D.C. pundits, but there is an unresolved issue on the minds of many in the Maryland medical community - will they see sense and lift the ban on federal funding for Syringe Services Programs (SSPs)? Currently Congress refuses to provide us with one of the cheapest, most effective tools as we struggle against the spread of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C in our communities. In response, over 70 scientists and health practitioners from Maryland have written to Sen. Barbara Mikulski, asking her to help end the ban. Such action is essential not just for our state but for the country as a whole.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Goalie Greg Dutton (Calvert Hall) and defenseman Joe Meurer (McDonogh), both seniors on the Ohio State men's lacrosse team, will serve as captains, the team announced. Dutton is a two-time All-Eastern College Athletic Conference second-team selection and was a 2013 ECAC All-Tournament team choice, leading the Buckeyes to the league tournament title and an NCAA berth. He was 16th nationally in goals-against average in 2013 (8.96). Meurer was voted the team's Defensive Most Valuable Player in 2013 and was a USILA Honorable Mention All-American and an All-ECAC first-team selection.
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