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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Federal and local authorities have charged more than two dozen people this week after an investigation into drug trafficking and related crimes in Anne Arundel County and Annapolis. Federal indictments were returned Tuesday against eight people from a probe into an alleged drug ring, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Baltimore. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives led law enforcement officers in serving federal search warrants at 10 locations and seven vehicles, some of them homes and vehicles of the federal defendants, the federal prosecutor's office said.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
From a home base in Houston, federal authorities say, a Remington native has been directing a cross-country drug operation that shipped large quantities of heroin to Baltimore, New York, New Orleans and elsewhere. Fred Douglas Brooks III, 46, had already served two federal prison terms for drug trafficking when he allegedly launched a new venture despite having betrayed a crew of Mexican suppliers by testifying against them in 2005. The latest business - a "high-level, interstate narcotics-trafficking and money-laundering operation," according to federal prosecutors in Louisiana - flourished until his arrest June 30 in Houston, authorities say. At least 16 people, including Brooks, have been charged in connection with the case; seven are charged in U.S. District Court in Maryland.
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NEWS
May 4, 2005
Howard County prosecutors yesterday dropped drug trafficking charges against a California truck driver stopped Jan. 12 on Interstate 95 with what police said was 103 pounds of marijuana stashed in a hidden compartment of his vehicle. Alejandro P. Chavez, 48, of Pixley, Calif., had been jailed since the incident. "Mr. Chavez did not know drugs were in the truck," State's Attorney Timothy J. McCrone said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Rarely do drug traffickers pick up their phones and openly conduct their business, plainly stating the quantities of drugs they would like to buy and prices they would like to pay. Instead, they generally use coded language in an attempt to obscure their activities. And even when investigators think they know the meaning of the conversations they catch on wiretaps, they still have to convince a jury that they've interpreted the interactions correctly. The difficulty of that job was on display this month in the case of Danilo Garcia, who was accused of trafficking heroin from New York to Baltimore after a long surveillance operation.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | October 14, 1990
There's some good news and bad news in the war on drugs in Harford County.The good news is the state police crack down on drug trafficking on Interstate 95 between the Baltimore-Harford county line and Cecil County is successfully deterring many drug dealers from using the highway to move narcotics, state police say.The bad news is dealers now are avoiding Interstate 95, using new routes to transport drugs. Two of those routes are Chesapeake Bay and the Susquehanna River, say state police.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 23, 1990
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- Drug trafficking and money laundering continue to thrive in Panama and may have increased since Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega was removed last December, according to U.S. and Panamanian officials.Panamanian authorities are fighting the problems with greater vigilance today, observers said. But the effort has been hampered by a free-for-all being fought over markets General Noriega has been accused of once holding.General Noriega, the former dictator who was arrested during last year's U.S. invasion, is awaiting trial in a Miami jail on drug-trafficking and money-laundering charges.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency continued to work with about two dozen Nicaraguan rebels and their supporters during the 1980s despite allegations that they were trafficking in drugs, according to a classified study by the CIA.The new study has found that the CIA's decision to keep these paid agents, or to continue dealing with them in some less-formal relationship, was made by top officials at the agency's headquarters in Langley, Va., in...
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2004
A 20-year-old Severn man pleaded guilty yesterday to a charge of possessing a firearm during drug trafficking and was sentenced to five years in prison without the possibility of parole. Howard County police found 54 bags of crack cocaine, a bag of marijuana and a loaded .40-caliber pistol in Charles A. Pigford's car during a traffic stop just hours after he was released from police custody on a charge of driving with a suspended license, prosecutors said. Pigford, of the 1800 block of Graybird Court, first caught the attention of a Howard officer when he crossed the double yellow line on eastbound Columbia 100 Parkway on Aug. 20, said State's Attorney Timothy J. McCrone, who prosecuted the case.
NEWS
By CAITLIN FRANCKE AND SCOTT HIGHAM and CAITLIN FRANCKE AND SCOTT HIGHAM,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1999
When police carted Gordon Ragler and his wife away in handcuffs last year, neighbors thought the around-the-clock drug dealing in their Southwest Baltimore community had finally come to an end.But 13 months later, the Raglers slipped through a net carefully crafted by undercover drug officers and confidential informants. It didn't seem to matter that police conducted hours of surveillance of open-air drug sales or collected solid evidence to make their case: 50 bags of cocaine and a loaded semiautomatic pistol.
NEWS
By Gary Marx and Cam Simpson and Gary Marx and Cam Simpson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 29, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - If they take power, the Haitian rebels closing in on this capital city are promising a new and more democratic era in this historically troubled and violent country. But experts and diplomats say several of the top rebel leaders are former military and police officials who are suspected of major human-rights violations while in power and who have allegedly financed their insurgency with past profits from the drug trade. That puts the would-be leaders on similar footing with the government of embattled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who U.S. officials and others say has allowed Haiti to become one of the region's most significant transit points for Colombian cocaine on its way to the United States.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Not long after Neill Franklin stepped behind a lectern in Annapolis to argue for making marijuana legal, the retired law enforcement officer was fighting tears again. It happens all the time - whenever he pauses to think of the futility of the war on drugs and the lives he says have been wasted. "We've been at this forever," he said. "It never worked. " As a broadening coalition pushes to legalize marijuana in Maryland this year, advocates have turned to Franklin to help sell the idea.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
A Cleveland man was sentenced Monday in Baltimore County to 20 years in prison for pimping women from Ohio over the Internet, according to the state's attorney's office. Prosecutors said Bennie Veasey, 32, lured a 19-year-old woman to Towson, where he forced her into prostitution and made her give him money to pay off lawyer's fees from a rape charge in Cleveland. The victim was interviewed after Baltimore County Police conducted a sting operation on April 17. Veasey was convicted in September of three counts of human trafficking and one count of prostitution.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The head teller at a Perry Hall bank and the reputed leader of a drug trafficking organization pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to a money laundering conspiracy, court records show. According to a copy of their plea agreements, Deanna Bailey was a member of a drug ring that moved at least 500 pounds of marijuana from the "southwestern United States to Maryland for the purpose of distributing it for profit once it arrived. " The government alleges Bailey was head of the organization - she says she was only a member, records show.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
A raid in April on the Pikesville home of a suspected drug trafficker turned up the usual tools of the trade, according to court documents: bundles of cash, some marijuana, seven handguns, a scale and a money counting machine. But agents also seized 98 pairs of men's shoes, according to the document. And authorities are now seeking to keep the footwear - which they value at $48,340, or $493 a pair - alleging that they were bought with drug money. The shoe collection is not described in the document, but the man whose feet they presumably fit is identified as Jerome Castle.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Really Raw Honey is known for its straight-from-the-hive product, a creamy white treat sold online and in hundreds of stores like Whole Foods. But the buzz about the Highlandtown-based company this week involved handguns, rifles, ammunition and cocaine Baltimore police say were seized in raids on the firm's warehouse and its owner's North Baltimore home. Owner Frantz Walker was charged with armed drug trafficking and held at Central Booking on $1 million bail until he posted bond Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Federal and local authorities have charged more than two dozen people this week after an investigation into drug trafficking and related crimes in Anne Arundel County and Annapolis. Federal indictments were returned Tuesday against eight people from a probe into an alleged drug ring, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Baltimore. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives led law enforcement officers in serving federal search warrants at 10 locations and seven vehicles, some of them homes and vehicles of the federal defendants, the federal prosecutor's office said.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 17, 1997
SAINT-NICOLAS, Quebec -- The bomb was simplicity itself. Fifty pounds of dynamite affixed to the gasoline tank of a Jeep. Insert detonator. Set timing device. Leave vehicle on the quiet street where Hell's Angels live.On March 8, the blast, attributed to a rival gang, shattered the stillness of this community, but hardly scratched the intended target -- the steel-shuttered, concrete-reinforced headquarters of the local chapter of "Les Hells," as riders of the world's most infamous motorcycle gang are called in Quebec.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
As a federal judge handed down a sentence that will virtually ensure Perry Roark spends the rest of his life behind bars, the founder of Maryland's largest home-grown prison gang renounced his association with the group. Roark, a hulking man known as "Rock," was sentenced to life in a prison Monday for his role in creating Dead Man Inc., an organization of white inmates that prosecutors said has since spread to other states and led to street violence throughout the Baltimore region.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Apparently Tavon White, the leader of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang at the Baltimore City Detention Center, has been running the prison for some time ("Corruption alleged at jail," April 24). To connect the dots between violent crime, simply follow the money - it leads to the group's drug trafficking. Power, and the money that generates it, drive illegal businesses. Excitement, money and power are pumped up on sound systems and flat screen TVs across the country. That makes it sexy to sell and use drugs and even to be a gang member.
NEWS
By Michael D. Barnes | March 4, 2013
Unfortunately, our nation faces enormous challenges in virtually every region of the globe. In countries ranging from Iran to North Korea to Syria to Mali, and on issues spanning terrorism, drug trafficking, global warming and cyber warfare, each day will bring seemingly impossible problems for our nation's foreign policy leaders, especially new Secretary of State John Kerry. There is one international issue, however, on which genuine progress is not only possible but is likely - if the secretary of state and President Barack Obama are prepared to make this issue a foreign policy priority.
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