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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | November 25, 1993
Just about every day, the corner of Greenmount Avenue and 20th Street in North Baltimore is populated by small knots of sullen young men, some passing around bottles in paper bags, others beckoning drivers and passers-by.Tomorrow, that intersection and 21 other "hot spot drug corners" throughout the city will be taken over by citizens and public officials singing, talking and exchanging information, if sponsors of a one-day demonstration against drug dealing have their way.The demonstration, dubbed "Going Out of Business Day," will take place from noon to midnight at 22 sites known for street-corner drug peddling.
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NEWS
By J. Howard Kucher | April 8, 2014
The "state of the city" is a hot topic right now. In this paper and many social media sites, there's a lot of talk about Baltimore - Are we OK? Should we move? Should we dig in? The discussion eventually comes back to concern about crime and murder rates in our fair city. Reading all of this, one question kept coming to me: Where is the church? For the record, I'm aware that there are many churches doing great things in this town. And the church has always been a leader in providing charitable support for the less fortunate.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 14, 1996
Friday morning, with a grimy sky spitting more snow and sleet across the local landscape, an East Baltimore guy brushes flecks of wet stuff out of his eyes and says, "You wouldn't believe what's going on down here. We got crack dealers in four-wheel drive vehicles. They're making house calls. They're meeting guys on the corner. I'm telling you, nothing stops these people."In his office eight floors above the city, the police commissioner of Baltimore, Thomas Frazier, would not be surprised to hear this.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Acting on neighbors' complaints about drug traffic, Anne Arundel County police raided a home Thursday in Glen Burnie, where they seized drugs, a gun and drug paraphernalia, police said. Police said they found a little more than 56 grams of marijuana, a .20-gauge shotgun and drug paraphernalia at the residence in the 800 block of Bentwillow Drive. They charged Patrick Andrew Swain, 20, with possession of marijuana, possession with intent to distribute and possession drug paraphernalia, they said.
NEWS
By John Rivera | January 1, 1992
While much of the city prepared last night to celebrate the New Year, the mood at the intersection of Gold and Division streets in West Baltimore was far from one of revelry.More than 60 people, including a number of neighborhood residents, gathered to commemorate the 303 murders committed in the city during the past year and to pay tribute to two women who fell at the corner, innocent bystanders shot to death just after midnight on Christmas Day.Speakers representing church and community groups exhorted the residents to become involved and to continue to aid efforts to combat drug traffic in the area.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A Park Heights grocery store that police called a center for drug traffic must be razed within 30 days, a Baltimore Circuit judge ruled yesterday, allowing the city for the first time to exercise its nuisance abatement powers to demolish a building.The ruling by Administrative Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan upheld a District Court decision in March ordering Allen B. Becker of Owings Mills to tear down Springhill Market, at 2900 Springhill Ave. Becker has until Oct. 1 to clear the site or post $100,000 bond to stay the decision and appeal.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Acting on neighbors' complaints about drug traffic, Anne Arundel County police raided a home Thursday in Glen Burnie, where they seized drugs, a gun and drug paraphernalia, police said. Police said they found a little more than 56 grams of marijuana, a .20-gauge shotgun and drug paraphernalia at the residence in the 800 block of Bentwillow Drive. They charged Patrick Andrew Swain, 20, with possession of marijuana, possession with intent to distribute and possession drug paraphernalia, they said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 22, 1996
SO THE CITY loses another good neighbor. Paul Weinberg, working out of his hardware store at Walbrook Junction merely since the end of World War II, locks his doors in a week, bequeaths the 3100 block of West North Avenue to the junkies, and that's that.Maybe you saw Marilyn McCraven's article in this newspaper last week. About Weinberg pulling out of his hardware store after 51 years, and the lady at the dry cleaners nearby doing the same after 26 years because thieves ripped out her copper water piping a week ago and left her without heat, and the barber a few doors away talking about his customers' fears of all those junkies hanging out on the corner all day long.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 22, 1996
It was all right at Greenmount and North avenues the other morning. Leon was there, currently in the twilight of a crummy life at the end of a needle, and he said he didn't hold anything personally against this president of the United States.This was good to hear, and sensible, despite the words of Bob Dole, who runs against Bill Clinton by blaming him for the unceasing condition of narcotics traffic in the nation."You heard about this?" I asked Leon. "Dole says Clinton hasn't done anything to stop your drug problem."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 23, 1999
THE LAST thing the next police commissioner of Baltimore, Ronald L. Daniel, wants to hear this morning are words from the last commissioner, who sent him to Siberia and never imagined he would return. But maybe a little arithmetic will give us all a sense of perspective as Daniel comes in from the cold.The last commissioner was Thomas C. Frazier, now departed against his will. One autumn day a couple of years ago, he sat in his office and began calculating the mathematics of a city's self-destruction.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2011
For decades, veteran police officers viewed Baltimore's Northeast Police District, dominated by middle-class, low-crime neighborhoods, as a "country club" assignment. But a rise in crime in some neighborhoods is changing that sentiment. Shootings and violence have been on the rise in the district — the city's largest, spanning 17 square miles including Lauraville, Ednor Gardens and Belair Edison — and it leads the city in homicides this year. The Police Department recently designated two neighborhoods in the area as "violent crime enforcement zones," putting them on a par with some of the most troubled spots in the city.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
From a window of his family's longtime North Bond Street rowhouse in East Baltimore, Lloyd Williams videotaped the activity on the street. A builder and home remodeler who grew up in the Oliver neighborhood, Williams was shocked by how the area had deteriorated since he left in the early 1990s. The scene was surreal, he thought, with addicts darting around corners to score drugs. "It was something out of a story, some type of science-fiction story, to see people controlled by drugs so vividly," he said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2010
The weeds behind the vacant lot next to Carolyn Pitt's Aiken Street home had reached her clothesline, but on Tuesday, volunteers mowed the plants down, picked up trash and painted the nearby playground to ignite efforts to revitalize the neighborhood. "Beer bottle, glass, needles - you name it" can be found in the small patch of pavement with a missing basketball hoop, Pitt, 54, said from her tidy front steps. "It's wonderful they are giving kids a chance to play over there," she said as she sat with two of her grandchildren, who she will not allow to play in the area because of the constant drug traffic.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2006
In an effort to disrupt drug dealing outside of corner convenience stores operating in residential neighborhoods, a Baltimore councilwoman is pushing for legislation that would give police the authority to temporarily close such businesses. If Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke's bill is approved, Baltimore police would be armed with a power once enacted during some of the city's worst years of drug violence in the early 1990s. While some council members express concern about punishing business owners for activities of people congregating outside their stores, most side with Clarke and community leaders who say temporary curfews might stem the foot traffic fueling the drug trade in many neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Ihosvani Rodriguez and Ihosvani Rodriguez,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | August 5, 2005
MIAMI - Federal agents yesterday rounded up 22 Miami-Dade County school system employees who were accused of being part of a prescription drug ring that illegally obtained and sold thousands of tablets of the painkiller oxycodone since 2003. Officials found no evidence that school employees sold the drug to students or used the highly addictive painkillers at work. The employees included five school bus drivers, 13 school bus attendants, a cook, two custodians and a school cashier. A Miami-Dade transit bus driver who was arrested worked previously as a school bus driver.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 10, 2004
JAMES WATKINS went to his grave this week with his secrets locked away forever. The Baltimore Police Department once made him a deputy chief, but the state's attorney's office called him a criminal. The courts haltingly gave Watkins legal vindication, and maybe even peace of mind. But, a quarter-century after his ordeal, only the Bear knew the final truth of things. They called him the Bear for his bulk and his larger-than-life persona. One summer afternoon -- this goes back to 1971, before we had 14-year-olds running crack cocaine and Stop Snitching DVDs all over town, when people still had naive delusions about controlling drug traffic -- Watkins led his Tactical Division's Stop Squad onto Pennsylvania Avenue and randomly arrested 35 people for the crime of standing on a sidewalk in America.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 26, 1991
''Could you get me a fix?''''Yeah, I could make a connection for you. It's no trouble.''The words echo from a distance of 20 years. The second voice belongs to a dope dealer outside the Cherry Hill Shopping Center. The first voice, asking for illegal drugs, is Dr. Neil Solomon's.Twenty years after the fact, he's come back to the problem which never went away.''Sure,'' he said yesterday, two days after he was named to head the Governor's Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission. ''I remember Cherry Hill very well.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 23, 1993
A message arrives the other day to call my brother Sidney, who is not precisely my brother. This is our little joke. A long time ago, when they rushed Sidney into intensive care at Union Memorial Hospital, nobody was admitted to see him except immediate family.''It's OK,'' I explained at the front desk. ''I'm his brother.''Nobody questioned this until the nurse got me to Sidney's bedside, where she noticed that he and I not only had separate last names but separate skin color as well. The nurse rolled her eyes and decided to let it go. The brother tag has stuck for more than 20 years.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2003
A Colorado man and a city woman were arrested Wednesday after their van was stopped in West Baltimore for a traffic violation, and officers found more than 400 pounds of marijuana in cardboard boxes, officials said. Gerardo Garcia, 27, of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Michaun Guest of Baltimore are each charged with possession with the intent to distribute marijuana, according to the city state's attorney's office. Guest's age and address were not available. Garcia was driving the van, which had Maryland license tags and was registered to a Severn man, police said.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pointing to the need to redirect resources to the war on terrorism, the Pentagon has quietly decided to scale back its effort to combat international drug trafficking, a central element of the national "war on drugs" for 14 years. Officials are weighing how exactly to pare the $1 billion-a-year program, but they want to reduce deployment of special operations troops on counter-narcotics missions and cut back the military's training of anti-drug police and soldiers in the United States and abroad.
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