Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDrug Trade
IN THE NEWS

Drug Trade

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 7, 1992
No one was charged when the Eastern Police District's "Zone Rangers" unit cut across town to seize drug paraphernalia at the Sonja Wholesale shop downtown. The listed owner, Joseph Yi, was reportedly out of the country. The store's employees were allowed to remain at the building, which police described as a "warehouse" for drug equipment. Still, the incident threw light on an ugly fact of life: Many otherwise legitimate businesses profit from the drug trade, even if they never handle an ounce of addictive substances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Drug sales in broad daylight at Lexington Market. An addict telling viewers Baltimore "is where you want to be for heroin," and then, after she scores, letting the camera watch her cook and shoot up in her car on a street that appears to be in Hampden. A masked drug dealer sitting at a table full of dope, pointing his gun at the camera and saying, "Coming to you live from Baltimore. " An on-screen headline that says, "Baltimore is the heroin capital of America. " This is how Baltimore is depicted in the National Geographic Channel's "Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire," which premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ROBERT CAMERON NEW | November 29, 1992
In one year the drug trade in America can be crushed. Wishful thinking? Not at all.The key to all law enforcement is community willingness to help the police find and prosecute law breakers. Prohibition failed because the people disagreed with the law, and they sat back and watched it being broken. The present situation with drugs is entirely different. People agree with the law.Maryland is a typical state insofar as the problem of drugs and the penalties exacted for prosecution. Simple possession of any illegal substance, from marijuana to heroin, carries a maximum penalty of four years in jail or $25,000 in fines, or both.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
This letter is in reply to Dan Rodricks ' column in The Sun, "A long line of heroin deaths, Baltimore to New York" (Feb. 4). In his moving column, Mr. Rodricks bemoans the loss of so many lives, including that of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, to the ravages of chronic heroin addiction. Mr. Rodricks remembers some worthy people who succumbed to this addiction in Baltimore. He is baffled and distressed that addicts are jailed for their malady, rather than hospitalized and treated.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | August 27, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- There is a downside to the opening of post-apartheid South Africa to the rest of the world, which has brought in trade and investment, concert tours and international sports. It has also brought drug trafficking.That was the message Lee Brown brought here during a four-day tour this week. Dr. Brown, director of the White House Office of National Drug Policy, better known as the country's drug czar, said that South Africa has the potential to become a major transit point in the world's narcotics traffic.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 11, 2005
DRUG DEALERS: Your mothers have been calling; your grandmothers too. I speak with them almost daily. The conversations are always pleasant, but the subject is always sad, and the subject is always you - the sons and grandsons who hustle drugs on the streets of Baltimore. Frustrated rowhouse matriarchs watch every day as you go out the door to do what the mother of a dealer named Donyell calls "selling that poison." Donyell, by the way, got out of the game a few weeks ago, after a brief story about him appeared in this column.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | September 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Back in the 1980s, Timothy McNally concocted an innovative scheme to net members of the Medellin drug cartel.As one of Miami's top federal drug investigators, he set up a fake store front to sell cellular phones and beepers, monitored the calls and 6l then intercepted cocaine shipments to dealers.The agents were so successful that the drug squad was able to videotape suspects as they returned to the shop to complain about their lost drugs.The investigation produced indictments against more than 100 people, including several key members of the Colombian cartel, and confiscation of more than 110 tons of drugs.
NEWS
By Peter Moskos | August 3, 2004
U.S. ATTORNEY Thomas M. DiBiagio recently announced the indictment of seven members of the North Avenue Boys. He said the bad guys are "finished." That's great. They should be in jail. But it won't help the community. Other drug dealers have already taken their place. North Avenue is no better off. Three years ago, I was a police officer at the scene on East North Avenue when 12 people were shot at an "RIP party" for a North Avenue Boys drug dealer who had himself been murdered. I saw the blood mixed with spaghetti.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Lisa Respers and Traci A. Johnson and Lisa Respers,Staff Writers | January 30, 1994
Icicles festoon the jungle gym behind the apartments on Westminster's South Center Street. Winter tightens its grip, temporarily keeping children out of school, their parents away from work and drug dealers off the streets.One year after a 22-year-old man was gunned down in the Carroll neighborhood as a result of a drug deal gone awry, people who live in the 100 block of S. Center St. have vastly different perceptions of whether the danger and the drug trafficking have abated."Oh, yeah, it's been much different.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Doug Donovan and Gus G. Sentementes and Doug Donovan,Sun reporters | October 21, 2006
As a Baltimore city councilman in the 1990s, Martin O'Malley railed against the Police Department's failures to effectively combat a brazen drug trade that was fueling more than 300 homicides annually. When he ran for mayor in 1999, O'Malley promised to make crime-fighting his top priority. His victory gave him the mandate to launch a controversial, zero-tolerance approach to drug corners, to revamp the Police Department's inner workings and to boldly pledge that murders would be reduced to 175 a year.
NEWS
January 5, 2014
So, after decades of literal open-warfare in the city driven by the drug trade, it takes a transplanted police commissioner from that bastion of safety, Oakland, Calif., to tell us that crime in the city is primarily limited to those who live and operate in the drug culture and that the "good guys and gals" should feel safe ("Batts: Crime dropped for 'everyday citizens' in 2013," Dec. 31). I can't wait for the new fire chief from the mega-metropolis of Lincoln, Neb., to tell us that the increased fire deaths in the city are primarily the result of smoke inhalation.
NEWS
By Sherrilyn Ifill | January 2, 2014
In a television interview, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts offered reassurance that the city's stubbornly high murder rate is not a cause for concern among "everyday citizens. " Instead, Mr. Batts has explained, more than 80 percent of the murders are gang member on gang member, drug-dealer on drug-dealer.  The chief's remarks may be factually accurate, but they also reinforce a view that underlies the response to inner city violence in too many American cities - the idea that violent crime and murder is unworthy of our outrage so long as the victims are gang members or participants in the drug trade.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
Baltimore's NAACP president said the city's gun violence affects a wide range of residents, even if the victims themselves tend to be involved in the drug trade.  On Monday, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said gun violence was "localized" and "not throughout the city as a whole. " He said "80 to 85 percent" of the victims are black men involved in the drug trade, and said "everyday citizens" saw crime, such as burglary and car break-ins, drop in 2013.  Through a spokesman, Batts has declined to clarify or elaborate on the comment.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
With murders, non-fatal shootings and street robberies up in 2013, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts emphasized in television interviews Monday that crime affecting "everyday citizens" was moving in the right direction.  "It's not throughout the city as a whole," Batts told WBAL-TV of the violence. "It's very localized and unfortunately, it's with African American men who are involved in the drug trade and 80 to 85 percent of the victims are involved in the drug trade going back and forth.
NEWS
By Leigh Maddox | October 7, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has recently made the case for beefing up law enforcement to battle this year's rise in crime, including in an op-ed in The Sun. "So long as levels of enforcement continue to decline," he argued, "shootings and homicides will continue to go up. " This argument overlooks the way an emphasis on enforcement prevents this city from tackling violent crime. In fact, over-enforcement has the opposite effect and renders crime more pernicious in the communities that are most affected.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
Unlike Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, we do have regrets regarding the wisdom of sponsoring the Baltimore Grand Prix and similar events ( "Rawlings-Blake: No regrets on the Grand Prix," Sept. 16). First, let's be clear. The Baltimore portrayed in "The Wire" is the clearest picture of what has been happening in this city for decades. It is a bitter pill to swallow. We've lived in Baltimore for 45 years, almost half a century. During this period we have served over a million meals, distributed at least 650 tons of non-perishable food to our neighbors and seen the suffering continue unabated.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
Four people charged with being involved in the drug trade in the Stillmeadows and Pioneer City neighborhoods are scheduled to appear today in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, and 12 additional suspects are to go before county judges for drug-related offenses in those West County neighborhoods in the coming weeks. The cases represent the fruits of a broad police effort that began in March to crack down on illegal drug activity - and associated crimes - in those neighborhoods. "We know there is drug activity over there, which contributes to shootings and assaults," said Lt. David D. Waltemeyer, a spokesman for the county police.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 5, 2004
The chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus denounced yesterday homegrown basketball star Carmelo Anthony's appearance on a DVD that features men smoking marijuana and making violent threats against police informants. In a written statement, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Maryland Democrat, said, "His [Anthony's] appearance in the videos sends a dangerous message that condones drug dealers and the deadly consequences of their criminal activities." Anthony and his agent have said that he was home visiting friends and didn't realize that he would be appearing on a widely distributed video.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
The 300 Man March, Baltimore's latest effort to rally against the worsening toll of killings that has hit the city this summer, turns out to have been inaptly named. Significantly more people than that are reported to have shown up - twice that many, by some estimates. They were people who are fed up with their communities being defined, their lives being dictated, by those who trade in violence and intimidation. It is widely known here that no matter how high Baltimore may climb on the list of America's most dangerous cities, that danger is largely confined to a handful of neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Neill Franklin | June 17, 2013
Thirteen years ago, Cpl. Ed Toatley was working undercover for the Maryland State Police when he was murdered during a botched drug deal in Washington, D.C. Ed was a close friend of mine, and his tragic death Oct. 30, 2000, began my quest to end America's longest war, the failed war on drugs. That quest led me to the newly formed Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), an international nonprofit organization for law enforcement professionals embarking on journeys similar to mine, where I have served as executive director for the past three years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.