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By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House approved a sweeping overhaul of the nation's drug safety system yesterday, as Congress moved swiftly to send President Bush a bill that significantly improves patient protections. The lopsided 403-16 House vote followed Senate passage in May of similar legislation to strengthen the Food and Drug Administration's ability to detect risky side effects of medicines already on the market. Congressional and independent inquiries conducted after the 2004 withdrawal of Vioxx found the agency's safety office to be understaffed, ill-equipped and overwhelmed.
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NEWS
March 1, 2013
Congress must act immediately on a balanced approach that will stop dangerous cuts and instead invest in our children and communities by closing tax loopholes for the wealthiest Americans and big corporations ("Social Security braces for cuts," Feb. 26). We as a nation can ill afford cuts to education, law enforcement and emergency responders, food and drug safety, mental health services, research and innovation, programs senior citizens rely on, or to the Internal Revenue Service.
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NEWS
By R. Alonso-Zaldivar and R. Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Embarrassed by recent safety debacles, the Food and Drug Administration pledged yesterday to improve its monitoring of dangerous side effects from medications that it has approved for patients. The agency's action follows the withdrawal of Vioxx, a powerful arthritis medication, and new warnings about prescribing anti-depressants to children and teens. "We don't always understand the full magnitude of drug risks prior to approval," acknowledged Dr. Steven Galson, acting director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | October 26, 2009
Question: : The inside of my mouth became very sensitive to salt, acid and anything spicy. When my wife looked, she said it looked like thrush. I went to my dentist to have it checked out. After a visual assessment and asking about medications, one of his first questions was, "Are you using a cinnamon toothpaste?" Stopping the cinnamon toothpaste and using a prescription medicated mouthwash called "Magic Mouthwash" cured the condition in about 10 days. I hope this will help other readers.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2004
The past few months have been tough for the Food and Drug Administration. The agency has been accused of turning a blind eye to the suicide risks of antidepressants, of being slow to recognize potentially deadly problems with Vioxx and of allowing other drugs to stay on the market despite known hazards. "They're giving a free pass to drugs on safety," said FDA safety officer Dr. David J. Graham, who raised early concerns about Vioxx and says some other popular drugs also pose too much risk.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - In recent years, critics have said the Food and Drug Administration focuses too much energy on approving new drugs and pays too little attention to health risks from medicines once they're on the market - and used by a much larger population. Two months ago, responding to that criticism on the eve of hearings examining the safety of Bextra, Celebrex, Vioxx and other painkillers, the FDA announced the creation of an oversight board to aggressively monitor drugs once they're on the market and tell the public about emerging health risks.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Congress must act immediately on a balanced approach that will stop dangerous cuts and instead invest in our children and communities by closing tax loopholes for the wealthiest Americans and big corporations ("Social Security braces for cuts," Feb. 26). We as a nation can ill afford cuts to education, law enforcement and emergency responders, food and drug safety, mental health services, research and innovation, programs senior citizens rely on, or to the Internal Revenue Service.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | September 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration's ability to assure the safety of prescription drugs is seriously compromised by internal squabbling, insufficient resources and inadequate authority, according to a long-awaited report released yesterday. The report, by the Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, adds to criticism of an agency embattled since revelations of deaths from certain painkillers and implantable heart devices began appearing in 2004. Its recommendations may also bolster reform efforts in Congress.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Embarrassed by reports of deaths linked to painkillers and suicides related to antidepressants in 2004, the Food and Drug Administration went into information overdrive. It issued more safety alerts, revised more drug package inserts and posted more updates on its Web site than ever before - all to keep doctors informed about the medications they prescribe. But critics say sheer volume isn't enough. Physicians, academics and health company officials complain that they are still not getting enough practical help.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 23, 2008
WASHINGTON - Two government health agencies that have traditionally operated as self-contained bureaucratic fiefdoms announced yesterday a joint venture that promises to improve prescription drug safety for Americans, while potentially reducing wasteful spending on medications. The Food and Drug Administration and Medicare agreed on rules for using information from Medicare's giant claims databases to create a computerized early-warning network for problems with medications and medical devices that come to light after they go on the market.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 23, 2008
WASHINGTON - Two government health agencies that have traditionally operated as self-contained bureaucratic fiefdoms announced yesterday a joint venture that promises to improve prescription drug safety for Americans, while potentially reducing wasteful spending on medications. The Food and Drug Administration and Medicare agreed on rules for using information from Medicare's giant claims databases to create a computerized early-warning network for problems with medications and medical devices that come to light after they go on the market.
NEWS
By Claire Panosian Dunavan | May 9, 2008
Not long ago, the global crisis in tainted and counterfeit drugs hit home for me. My cousin Laura - high-octane teacher, wife and mom - was rushed to her local emergency room. Six weeks earlier, she had had surgery for a broken tibia and fibula. Now a vein in her leg had clotted, and she needed immediate, high-dose anticoagulation. Physically and psychologically, Laura's first hospital stay had been bad enough. Unfortunately, after the surgery, no one had told her to stop taking her birth control pills because of the risk of clotting.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Spurred by the public's deepening fears of deadly imports, Congress is moving to give federal health officials the added money and new police powers they have long wanted to fix a broken drug safety system. After years of criticizing the Food and Drug Administration's failures, Democratic and Republican legislators are coming together on strengthening the embattled agency. "FDA is overstretched in terms of its responsibilities and underfunded," Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a Massachusetts Democrat, said at a hearing last week on the agency's troubles.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | September 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House overwhelmingly approved a measure yesterday that would take significant steps to strengthen the nation's drug safety system. It would expand the government's authority to monitor drugs for dangerous side effects and warn of potential harms after the drugs go on sale. Democratic Rep. John D. Dingell of Michigan, chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said the legislation contained "much-needed reforms." The House vote ratified a compromise by House and Senate negotiators after months of negotiations over details of the 422-page bill.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House approved a sweeping overhaul of the nation's drug safety system yesterday, as Congress moved swiftly to send President Bush a bill that significantly improves patient protections. The lopsided 403-16 House vote followed Senate passage in May of similar legislation to strengthen the Food and Drug Administration's ability to detect risky side effects of medicines already on the market. Congressional and independent inquiries conducted after the 2004 withdrawal of Vioxx found the agency's safety office to be understaffed, ill-equipped and overwhelmed.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | September 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration's ability to assure the safety of prescription drugs is seriously compromised by internal squabbling, insufficient resources and inadequate authority, according to a long-awaited report released yesterday. The report, by the Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, adds to criticism of an agency embattled since revelations of deaths from certain painkillers and implantable heart devices began appearing in 2004. Its recommendations may also bolster reform efforts in Congress.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | October 26, 2009
Question: : The inside of my mouth became very sensitive to salt, acid and anything spicy. When my wife looked, she said it looked like thrush. I went to my dentist to have it checked out. After a visual assessment and asking about medications, one of his first questions was, "Are you using a cinnamon toothpaste?" Stopping the cinnamon toothpaste and using a prescription medicated mouthwash called "Magic Mouthwash" cured the condition in about 10 days. I hope this will help other readers.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Embarrassed by reports of deaths linked to painkillers and suicides related to antidepressants in 2004, the Food and Drug Administration went into information overdrive. It issued more safety alerts, revised more drug package inserts and posted more updates on its Web site than ever before - all to keep doctors informed about the medications they prescribe. But critics say sheer volume isn't enough. Physicians, academics and health company officials complain that they are still not getting enough practical help.
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