Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDrug Rehabilitation
IN THE NEWS

Drug Rehabilitation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1996
A 20-year-old Francis Scott Key High School student was granted probation before judgment yesterday and ordered to enroll in a drug rehabilitation program within three weeks.Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. ordered Steven E. Lewis of Westminster released from the Carroll County Detention Center, where he had been since Nov. 4 for failing to complete terms of his probation in another case.Lewis was initially granted probation before judgment in November 1995 on charges involving a breaking and entering and an assault on a man in Westminster.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Luke Lavoie, Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 24, 2013
Howard County police found the convicted felon wanted in the shooting of an officer as the man limped along U.S. 1 Thursday morning, concluding a manhunt that had begun the day before while authorities canvassed the area. Stephon Prather, 29, was found walking with the help of two sticks near the spot where police said he exchanged gunshots Wednesday with three officers. Authorities said he had been shot twice in the legs and believe he spent the night in a storm drain where investigators later found a gun. Prather's capture came after hundreds of officers — including aviation, canine and foot patrol units — scoured a half-mile-wide wooded area along the busy thoroughfare in Laurel.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kathleen B. Hennelly and Kathleen B. Hennelly,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 24, 1996
Two 16-year-old girls have been charged as adults in an attempted carjacking in Ellicott City early Friday and a 14-year-old girl has been charged as a juvenile in the case, Howard County police said.Asia T. McPhaul of Temple Hills and Denise T. VanRyn of Baltimore were in the Howard County Detention Center yesterday on $50,000 bail each.Police said there would be a hearing this week at which the defense is expected to argue that the two should be tried as juveniles.The third girl was released Friday to the Oakview Treatment Center, a drug rehabilitation facility in Ellicott City.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 12, 2013
I laughed at a news report quoting an official who lamented that Lexington Market lacked a French bakery. The Lexington Market I know is a place that has a thriving bakery, but it sells red velvet cake by the slice and at a price to fit its customers' pocketbooks. As beat-up and poorly maintained as the market is, it possesses a thriving urban vitality. It's good to go there for a Baltimore reality check. The people-watching is incredible and a lot of money seems to change hands.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 20, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Concluding that drug rehabilitation programs are "a neglected front line in the war against drug abuse," a panel of experts is proposing a shift in federal resources to improve and expand the nation's drug treatment system.In a study undertaken by the prestigious Institute of Medicine, researchers found that rehabilitation is an important and cost-effective means of fighting the war on drugs."The treatment methods available today can yield benefits . . . that well exceed the costs of delivering these services," Lawrence S. Lewin, chairman of the research panel, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1999
Republican mayoral candidate David F. Tufaro yesterday picked up the endorsement of an African-American community group opposing Democratic nominee Martin O'Malley's plans to implement zero tolerance.Group leaders from Together Everyone Achieves More (TEAM), a small group of Southwest Baltimore community activists, said yesterday that they will back Tufaro, who supports the organization's call to create an intensive three-year drug rehabilitation and job training program. TEAM is pushing for more drug rehabilitation in the city.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
The recent article regarding city finances ("Trash fee, job cuts urged," Feb. 12) cited no evidence of the primary cause of the population loss of Baltimore City. The mayor assumes that high property taxes are the reason. I disagree. I believe drug-fed crime is the primary cause. Can't someone do a simple poll to find out why people have left Baltimore? If I am right, the answer is not to cut city services to lower property taxes but to decriminalize drugs and establish more health clinics for drug rehabilitation.
NEWS
March 29, 2009
Seeking a voice on group homes It is disappointing to see continued misrepresentation of neighborhoods' opposition to the group home legislation before the City Council ("Treatment centers part of the solution," letters, March 22). We are not anti drug rehabilitation or group home operations; we are pro communities having a voice in the establishment of these facilities, many of which are run as for-profit businesses, in our neighborhoods. We can all agree that there is a need for group homes; however, this flawed legislation would create more problems than it would solve.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2001
Five months after residents thought they'd stopped the demolition of Conowingo Village, an abandoned neighborhood in Harford County, the state and the power company that owns the property are poised to announce that most of the homes will be demolished and the area turned into parkland. Neither the Department of Natural Resources nor Pennsylvania-based Exelon Generation would give details of the negotiations, but Del. Barry Glassman, a Harford Republican who has worked on the issue, said he expects an announcement in the next several weeks that the state will take over the property and preserve one or two homes.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
A bill inspired by Kirk R. DeCosmo, a drug trafficker convicted in one Glen Burnie case of vehicular homicide a decade ago and charged in another this year, brought tearful testimony before a legislative committee yesterday from the sister of his first victim. House Bill 1071, which would require monthly drug testing for drivers who have killed while under the influence, was endorsed by B.J. Brokus; her sister, Freda Kay Seifert, 44, died in a fiery 1987 collision on Ritchie Highway caused by DeCosmo.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The quiet at East Federal and North Bethel streets in the city's Oliver neighborhood on Tuesday morning was punctuated only by the steady rumble of a city work crew, preparing a nearby alleyway for repaving. Missing, said a local community organizer, Earl Johnson, were the shouts and murmurs of the young men who normally crowd the surrounding sidewalks and corners of the East Baltimore block, an area notorious as an open drug market. "There are usually 40 to 50 people milling around.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
The recent article regarding city finances ("Trash fee, job cuts urged," Feb. 12) cited no evidence of the primary cause of the population loss of Baltimore City. The mayor assumes that high property taxes are the reason. I disagree. I believe drug-fed crime is the primary cause. Can't someone do a simple poll to find out why people have left Baltimore? If I am right, the answer is not to cut city services to lower property taxes but to decriminalize drugs and establish more health clinics for drug rehabilitation.
NEWS
March 29, 2009
Seeking a voice on group homes It is disappointing to see continued misrepresentation of neighborhoods' opposition to the group home legislation before the City Council ("Treatment centers part of the solution," letters, March 22). We are not anti drug rehabilitation or group home operations; we are pro communities having a voice in the establishment of these facilities, many of which are run as for-profit businesses, in our neighborhoods. We can all agree that there is a need for group homes; however, this flawed legislation would create more problems than it would solve.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 4, 2005
There's no question that Michael Rabuck should have been institutionalized. People and their property in the city and Baltimore County were safer with him off the street. But this drug-addicted man ended up in a maximum-security prison, the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, where other inmates were eager to give him heroin - and willing to kill him if he did not get his family to pay for it. So his family paid for it. Money his parents could have spent for something worthwhile - say, their son's drug rehabilitation - went instead to associates of Jessup prisoners who kept Rabuck, 29, supplied with the heroin that ultimately killed him. Michael Rabuck was no innocent.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 20, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Rush Limbaugh is back on the air after five weeks of drug rehabilitation, although experts say it could be weeks before El Rushbo recovers his full sense of self-importance. His return sermon bombarded listeners with fusillades of what sounded a lot like humility, evidence that his rehabilitative treatment had broken down his defenses, cracked through his sense of denial and gotten him in touch with his feelings, as well as his audience. It took at least a half-hour before his voice could de-mellow enough to take a New Age-sounding shot at "lib-brools": "The attempt to manipulate lib-brools into changing who they are and becoming nice guys and liking us is always going to fail because it's not our job to make them like us," he opined.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2001
Five months after residents thought they'd stopped the demolition of Conowingo Village, an abandoned neighborhood in Harford County, the state and the power company that owns the property are poised to announce that most of the homes will be demolished and the area turned into parkland. Neither the Department of Natural Resources nor Pennsylvania-based Exelon Generation would give details of the negotiations, but Del. Barry Glassman, a Harford Republican who has worked on the issue, said he expects an announcement in the next several weeks that the state will take over the property and preserve one or two homes.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1999
Mayoral candidate Mary W. Conaway announced yesterday that if elected, she would appoint a high-level Cabinet official to coordinate new anti-drug efforts in the city.The official would oversee drug rehabilitation -- including job and literacy training -- among several city departments, said Conaway, who is the city's Register of Wills.Vowing to help eradicate what she called "blight in Baltimore City," Conaway pledged to create an agency to keep track of addicts moving through corrections, parole and social service programs.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | August 7, 1991
One of the nation's most controversial drug treatment programs has opened in Columbia amid protests, picket lines and legal wrangling over whether the facility will be allowed to operate in Maryland.Sixprotesters carried picket signs Monday outside Straight Inc.'s office in the Oakland Ridge Industrial Park, denouncing the drug rehabilitation program for youngsters as violent and abusive.The protesters said they expect to be picketing the office, whichopened July 29, every Monday and Friday.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
The state proposed strict new policies yesterday to prevent transit workers with drug problems from returning to the controls of trains and buses - even as investigators said preliminary tests show no evidence of illegal drugs behind Tuesday's crash of a light rail train at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The Mass Transit Administration said, however, that four of its 2,400 workers in "safety-sensitive" positions - including drivers - are still on the job after twice testing positive for drugs.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
A bill inspired by Kirk R. DeCosmo, a drug trafficker convicted in one Glen Burnie case of vehicular homicide a decade ago and charged in another this year, brought tearful testimony before a legislative committee yesterday from the sister of his first victim. House Bill 1071, which would require monthly drug testing for drivers who have killed while under the influence, was endorsed by B.J. Brokus; her sister, Freda Kay Seifert, 44, died in a fiery 1987 collision on Ritchie Highway caused by DeCosmo.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.