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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 29, 2009
So, give me that again: Heroin and cocaine are illegal - controlled, dangerous substances - because they are harmful to society, destroyers of bodies and minds, destroyers of families, even whole neighborhoods? Is that it? We have state and federal prohibitions against the sale and possession of these narcotics because, otherwise, we would have widespread dysfunction in American households and mayhem on our streets? We have devoted billions of taxpayer dollars and millions of hours of police work to stopping the illegal drug commerce because, without that effort, we think the United States would be a dangerous place?
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NEWS
May 30, 2014
In The Sun article "New views about crime" (May 25) the writers failed to mention the Libertarian approach to the failed war on drugs. As the Libertarian candidate for attorney general, my main campaign theme is to end the drug war. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. We have more people in prison than Russia and China combined! At the same time we have the highest rate of drug usage in the world. A definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect a different result.
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NEWS
By Peter Moskos | August 3, 2004
U.S. ATTORNEY Thomas M. DiBiagio recently announced the indictment of seven members of the North Avenue Boys. He said the bad guys are "finished." That's great. They should be in jail. But it won't help the community. Other drug dealers have already taken their place. North Avenue is no better off. Three years ago, I was a police officer at the scene on East North Avenue when 12 people were shot at an "RIP party" for a North Avenue Boys drug dealer who had himself been murdered. I saw the blood mixed with spaghetti.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
As the search for Baltimore's next top cop plods along, at least one candidate appears to be openly campaigning for the post - and has a well-known supporter.  Stanford "Neill" Franklin, who had a 33-year law enforcement career in Maryland and is now executive director of a national group of police against drug prohibition , seems to want the job. A web article appeared this week featuring endorsements for Franklin , including one from...
NEWS
By David Simon | March 12, 2011
Felicia Pearson is, first of all, entitled to the presumption of innocence. And I would note that a previous, but recent drug arrest that targeted her was later found to be unwarranted and the charges were dropped. Nonetheless, I'm certainly sad at the news of her arrest this week. This young lady has, from her earliest moments, had one of the hardest lives imaginable. And whatever good fortune came from her role in "The Wire" seems, in retrospect, limited to that project. She worked hard as an actor and was entirely professional, but the entertainment industry as a whole does not offer a great many roles for those who can portray people from the other America.
NEWS
February 11, 2000
It's drug prohibition that's the source of the expense, violence In their recent column, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Dan Morhaim wrote: "Substance abuse . . . costs the state an estimated $5.5 billion a year." ("State must take charge on drug addiction," Opinion Commentary, Feb. 1) They should have said that it is the failed policy of drug prohibition, not substance abuse itself, that costs the state $5.5 billion a year. The authors gave lip service to drug treatment, but didn't note that the state's budget allots two-thirds of drug-related funds to law enforcement and prisons.
NEWS
By Kevin A. Sabet | October 9, 2011
Prohibition - America's notoriously "failed social experiment" to rid the country of alcohol - took center stage this past week as PBS broadcast Ken Burns' highly acclaimed series on the subject. And already, it has been seized on by drug-legalization advocates who say it proves that drug prohibition should be abandoned. But a closer look at what resulted from alcohol prohibition and its relevance to today's anti-drug effort reveals a far more nuanced picture than the legalization lobby might like to admit.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
As the search for Baltimore's next top cop plods along, at least one candidate appears to be openly campaigning for the post - and has a well-known supporter.  Stanford "Neill" Franklin, who had a 33-year law enforcement career in Maryland and is now executive director of a national group of police against drug prohibition , seems to want the job. A web article appeared this week featuring endorsements for Franklin , including one from...
NEWS
May 30, 2014
In The Sun article "New views about crime" (May 25) the writers failed to mention the Libertarian approach to the failed war on drugs. As the Libertarian candidate for attorney general, my main campaign theme is to end the drug war. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. We have more people in prison than Russia and China combined! At the same time we have the highest rate of drug usage in the world. A definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect a different result.
NEWS
By Devon Hutchins | June 4, 2009
The week before the legislative session ended, Maryland's General Assembly hosted Michael Phelps to recognize his achievements at the Beijing Olympics. Just two months after critics claimed his career and reputation would never recover from the infamous photo of him apparently smoking marijuana that circulated the Internet, state senators and delegates honored him with a standing ovation. The incident underscores what some recognize as a shift away from the disproportionately "tough on crime" attitude for which Maryland legislators have been known.
NEWS
By Kevin A. Sabet | October 9, 2011
Prohibition - America's notoriously "failed social experiment" to rid the country of alcohol - took center stage this past week as PBS broadcast Ken Burns' highly acclaimed series on the subject. And already, it has been seized on by drug-legalization advocates who say it proves that drug prohibition should be abandoned. But a closer look at what resulted from alcohol prohibition and its relevance to today's anti-drug effort reveals a far more nuanced picture than the legalization lobby might like to admit.
NEWS
By David Simon | March 12, 2011
Felicia Pearson is, first of all, entitled to the presumption of innocence. And I would note that a previous, but recent drug arrest that targeted her was later found to be unwarranted and the charges were dropped. Nonetheless, I'm certainly sad at the news of her arrest this week. This young lady has, from her earliest moments, had one of the hardest lives imaginable. And whatever good fortune came from her role in "The Wire" seems, in retrospect, limited to that project. She worked hard as an actor and was entirely professional, but the entertainment industry as a whole does not offer a great many roles for those who can portray people from the other America.
NEWS
By Neill Franklin | March 7, 2011
Several thousand miles, and a comparable cultural divide, separate Elkins, W.Va., from San Luis Potosi, Mexico. But recently, they became sister cities of a grim sort when law enforcement professionals lost their lives fighting America's longest, most costly and least winnable war: the so-called "war on drugs. " On Highway 57, halfway between Monterrey and Mexico City, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Special Agent Jaime Zapata died when cartel gunmen ambushed the car carrying him and a colleague, who was wounded.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 29, 2009
So, give me that again: Heroin and cocaine are illegal - controlled, dangerous substances - because they are harmful to society, destroyers of bodies and minds, destroyers of families, even whole neighborhoods? Is that it? We have state and federal prohibitions against the sale and possession of these narcotics because, otherwise, we would have widespread dysfunction in American households and mayhem on our streets? We have devoted billions of taxpayer dollars and millions of hours of police work to stopping the illegal drug commerce because, without that effort, we think the United States would be a dangerous place?
NEWS
By Devon Hutchins | June 4, 2009
The week before the legislative session ended, Maryland's General Assembly hosted Michael Phelps to recognize his achievements at the Beijing Olympics. Just two months after critics claimed his career and reputation would never recover from the infamous photo of him apparently smoking marijuana that circulated the Internet, state senators and delegates honored him with a standing ovation. The incident underscores what some recognize as a shift away from the disproportionately "tough on crime" attitude for which Maryland legislators have been known.
NEWS
By Peter Moskos | August 3, 2004
U.S. ATTORNEY Thomas M. DiBiagio recently announced the indictment of seven members of the North Avenue Boys. He said the bad guys are "finished." That's great. They should be in jail. But it won't help the community. Other drug dealers have already taken their place. North Avenue is no better off. Three years ago, I was a police officer at the scene on East North Avenue when 12 people were shot at an "RIP party" for a North Avenue Boys drug dealer who had himself been murdered. I saw the blood mixed with spaghetti.
NEWS
January 7, 2003
Our drug policy should focus on harm reduction According to a recent Sun article on Baltimore's intensive anti-drug campaign, "Some experts say that temporary stepped-up enforcement in certain areas simply shifts crime from one part of the city to another" ("Intensive campaign by city police yields short-term success," Dec. 29). Does moving open-air drug markets from one neighborhood to the next constitute victory in the war on drugs? Attempts to limit the supply of illegal drugs while demand remains constant only increase the profits from drug trafficking.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Evidence shows that marijuana can be medicine If Jeffrey A. Schaler wants to legalize every drug for everybody, he certainly has a right to that opinion ("Decision to smoke pot shouldn't involve doctor," Opinion Commentary, May 12). But it is odd to see him join forces with arch-prohibitionists in demonizing and distorting the views of medical marijuana advocates. And the Marijuana Policy Project - which led the fight for the medical marijuana bill awaiting Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s signature - does not "argue that marijuana is a panacea."
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