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NEWS
February 25, 2012
As a former drug abuse counselor, I was appalled by the statement made by a school administrator that it's the teachers who have to shape up in to quell violent behavior by students ("School behavior policies shifting," Feb. 20). Better have the student take a drug test. Where there is harm to people or property, there usually is drug use. Alcohol is a drug. It changes people, intensifies their emotions, so if people start out angry, they will be angrier later on. If the student is the victim, or observes violence in the home or neighborhood, it is more likely that that behavior will be copied.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Wesley Case, Justin George, Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Does the EDM scene have a drug problem? The question, which has followed the increasingly mainstream electronic dance music genre for years, is being raised again in the wake of the deaths of two males, ages 20 and 17, who attended an all-day EDM show last weekend in Columbia. Nineteen other people were sent to hospitals from Friday's Mad Decent Block Party at Merriweather Post Pavilion, which featured artists such as Diplo, Flux Pavilion and Dillon Francis. The concerns come as Baltimore prepares for the first-ever Moonrise Festival, which will take place Saturday and Sunday at Pimlico Race Course and feature genre heavyweights Kaskade and Bassnectar.
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FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
This week, mega-superstar Michael Jackson admitted an addiction to painkillers.Last week, actor River Phoenix's autopsy revealed an overdose of cocaine and heroin caused his death.When celebrities are arrested, confess or worse -- die -- because of drugs, does all the media attention help the struggle to control the drug epidemic?"What it does is focus the general public's attention on the use of drugs by celebrities or middle-class people," says Richard Lane, director of Man Alive Research Inc., a Baltimore methadone treatment center.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
In The Sun article "New views about crime" (May 25) the writers failed to mention the Libertarian approach to the failed war on drugs. As the Libertarian candidate for attorney general, my main campaign theme is to end the drug war. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. We have more people in prison than Russia and China combined! At the same time we have the highest rate of drug usage in the world. A definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over and expect a different result.
NEWS
October 4, 1992
Last week, Perspective published the text of a letter fro Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to Bob Martinez, the federal "drug czar." The Schmoke letter said law enforcement efforts were not controlling drugs, which needed to be treated more as a public health problem. Here is the text of the reply from Mr. Martinez, dated September 30.Mayor Schmoke:Thank you for sharing your views on the President's National Drug Control Strategy. I welcome not only your comments, but those of all the mayors, legislators, and other city and state officials around the country who have shared their experiences and insights with us. I sought this counsel in good faith, and I regard it as an important contribution to the process by which the National Strategy is developed.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2001
"OUT OF SIGHT, out of mind." All too often that is how parents feel about the increasing drug problem among young people in Carroll County. Mike College, a retired Maryland State Police narcotics officer, said society often forgets about heroin use until it becomes front-page news. "Heroin has been here before, and it's still here," he said. College said statistics can't be ignored. Heroin overdose deaths in Carroll County rose from two in 1999 to eight last year. Perhaps more frightening for parents, nine of 10 youths treated at the Carroll County Drug Treatment facility were approached with drugs by friends.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | October 16, 1990
Paul still breaks into tears when he thinks about how close he came to dying before finally breaking free of 19 years of drug addiction and crime.The 38-year-old Anne Arundel Community College student took the first steps toward recovery when he enrolled at the college two years ago, to prepare for a career in veterinary medicine.And thanks to the efforts of an English teacher at AACC, Paul can take advantage of a support network geared to help him make it through the days at school -- a network he has found so helpful that Paul now volunteers to help others with similar problems.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | August 28, 1992
London. -- The other day, my 23-year-old daughter arrived back in London from an eight-month stint as a sports instructor in Aspen, Colo. To her shock and dismay, she learned that while she was in America, one of her London girlhood chums was put away for six years for dealing in cocaine.Cocaine is everywhere in London. She knows that and so do I. But even by her standards, what she saw in Aspen was an abundance that the Cornucopians of London couldn't match in their wildest dreams.In her opinion, and I couldn't find a credible argument to dissuade her, the police of Aspen must be privy to the marijuana-cocaine life-style, otherwise so plentiful a trade could not survive relatively unmolested.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1995
Bywater Mutual Homes was designed more than 20 years ago as an idealistic experiment aimed at turning tenants into homeowners. Now, many dwellers say drugs, not residents, own the community."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
DUBLIN, Ireland -- Night after night, for weeks now, thousands of angry Dubliners have been marching up to the doorsteps of people they suspect to be drug dealers, shouting, cursing and demanding that they leave the neighborhood. The police stand by, not making arrests, merely keeping the demonstrators in line."Get out now!" a demonstrator shouted, with several hundred people cheering him, during a recent protest in a working-class area of Dublin's north side."We're addicts, not pushers," a haggard young woman shouted back from a second-floor window.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A Baltimore County councilwoman is seeking to tighten a local ban on synthetic marijuana, saying manufacturers have found ways around a state ban enacted last year as well as federal and county laws. Councilwoman Vicki Almond said existing laws against synthetic marijuana, often called K2 or Spice, only prohibit certain chemical compounds - and manufacturers can tweak formulas to make them legal. "These chemicals - they just change them so often that there's no way to keep up with naming the chemicals that are involved in this stuff," said Almond, who introduced the county legislation.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
Commentator Scott Soffen was spot-on about the U.S.' failed drug policy ( "It's time to end the war on drugs," Nov. 12). By any objective standard, our national drug policies have been an unmitigated disaster. The U.S. is spending tens of billions of dollars a year perpetuating the same failed policies that do not solve the drug problem but instead exacerbate it, all the while stigmatizing users and disproportionately affecting low-income communities. Sadly, there has not been nearly enough national leadership on this issue.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
Many of us have been saying for years that we are not going to arrest our way out of our nation's drug problem, so I totally support the change of philosophy and policy about sentencing certain drug offenders ( "Minimal reform on mandatory sentencing," Aug. 14). I would like to caution both the public and our criminal justice system that just changing sentencing policies does not mean we have solved anything. As a former addict, I can tell you that most low level drug dealers are also addicted to drugs themselves.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Cortly "C.D. " Witherspoon, a Baltimore minister and activist, has been scoping out convenience stores that sell products such as "Scooby Snax. " The glossy package features a picture of a dazed-looking cartoon character, Scooby Doo. A sticker advises that the contents have a blueberry flavor, though the package contains dried herbs, not candy. The minister's mission has been to get such products out of the hands of Baltimore's youth, who are smoking the stuff in hopes of getting high.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
Regarding your recent article about Baltimore's drug problem, anyone whom has visited a city courthouse, taken a police ride-along or grown up in one of the city's poorer black communities knows there is a war going on here ("Anti-drug-war cop wants Baltimore police commissioner opening," July 26). That war is being fought for unclear reasons with horrific results. The official name for it is the "war on drugs," but a more apt name would be the war on reason. Prohibition has failed, and the effects it is having on Baltimore are far worse than those of the city's high property tax rate.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 19, 2012
When Harford County's chief prosecutor, State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly, reached a plea agreement with a repeat-offending burglar that gave the 28-year-old admitted drug abuser 28 years to serve in prison, there was a lot to like about the deal. Asked about the plea agreement, Cassilly said: "If you're going to break into houses to steal stuff for your drug problem, we're going to ask for jail time. If you have a history of breaking into people's houses, we're going to ask for serious jail time.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
As promised by the principal of Westminster High School, a state trooper and an emergency room physician delivered a strong warning to parents and students at an anti-drug forum last night.The trooper recited statistics that he said are evidence of a growing drug problem in Carroll County.The Carroll County General Hospital emergency room physician told of three heroin-related deaths and more than 50 cases of heroin overdose in the past six months.Knowledge is essential in the battle against drugs, but Sherri-Le W. Bream, the principal, asked for more than avid listeners.
FEATURES
By Anthony Schmitz and Anthony Schmitz,In Health Magazine Universal Press Syndicate | September 17, 1991
WELL AFTER he had retired from his career as a high school teacher and principal, Oliver Stendgren still kept active, hunting, fishing and tending his garden. Tall and broad-shouldered, he'd been an imposing figure in his prime. And even when he reached his 80s, age seemed to have touched Stendgren's body only lightly.His mind, unfortunately, was another matter. By the time Stendgren was 84, his daughter Sheila (the names of Stendgren and his daughter have been changed to protect their privacy)
NEWS
February 25, 2012
As a former drug abuse counselor, I was appalled by the statement made by a school administrator that it's the teachers who have to shape up in to quell violent behavior by students ("School behavior policies shifting," Feb. 20). Better have the student take a drug test. Where there is harm to people or property, there usually is drug use. Alcohol is a drug. It changes people, intensifies their emotions, so if people start out angry, they will be angrier later on. If the student is the victim, or observes violence in the home or neighborhood, it is more likely that that behavior will be copied.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meagan O'Neill | February 16, 2012
I woke up this morning with one thought -- The night is finally here! Well, maybe not quite, but I know I don't speak only for myself when I say that I've been waiting for this episode since it was first teased in the series opener. Whenever"Revenge" is discussed, at some point the question arises: “Do you think Daniel is really dead?!” Now we know the answer: Nope! I think most knew it was unlikely that Daniel would actually be killed off the show, but we have also learned that nothing is predictable on "Revenge.
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