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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
A group of alleged Black Guerrilla Family members met last December to discuss a robbery with a confidential source, who, unbeknownst to them, was working with the Drug Enforcement Administration. The price of cocaine in Baltimore City at that moment was "high" at $40,000 per kilogram, agents wrote in court documents, making the proposed robbery "especially lucrative. " "Coke price [is] high and everything, but a better price is free," the source told the group. In a more recent court document, however, that estimate had tumbled by 30 percent.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
A group of alleged Black Guerrilla Family members met last December to discuss a robbery with a confidential source, who, unbeknownst to them, was working with the Drug Enforcement Administration. The price of cocaine in Baltimore City at that moment was "high" at $40,000 per kilogram, agents wrote in court documents, making the proposed robbery "especially lucrative. " "Coke price [is] high and everything, but a better price is free," the source told the group. In a more recent court document, however, that estimate had tumbled by 30 percent.
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FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 4, 1995
Have you ever heard kids squabbling? "Did not!" "Did too!" An argument over prescription drug prices has taken on the same character.Families USA, a consumer watchdog group, maintains that prices of popular prescription medications have risen at almost twice the rate of inflation.Ron Pollack, the director of Families USA, says, "The public should be worried. If, year after year, the prices of prescription drugs increase faster than inflation, more and more people will find them unaffordable."
EXPLORE
August 12, 2011
Editor: It was with a mixture of bemusement and surprise that I read Andy Harris' ad in the Aug. 3 Aegis . He is attempting to portray himself as Medicare's savior. However, I have a letter from Representative Harris dated July 18 in which he supports Representative Ryan's Voucher system for Medicaid. This would in fact decimate the program. The vouchers would pay for a diminishing portion of health insurance premiums and seniors, if they can get coverage at all, would pay increasingly higher percentages for Medicaid care.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Instead of imposing controls on drug prices, President Clinton's health care task force may suggest forming a review board to help keep prices down.The board would be loosely modeled after a Canadian agency that has helped control prescription drug prices in that country, according to confidential work papers obtained from the Task Force on National Health Care.The Canadian agency, the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board, has helped slow the rise of drug prices in Canada, according to a recent congressional study.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | May 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Backing off from mandatory price controls on drugs, the White House health care reform task force is recommending a more politically acceptable plan that would pressure pharmaceutical companies to limit price increases to the rate of inflation.Companies would have to sign agreements to limit increases to the Consumer Price Index for all products -- which rose 2.9 percent last year, about half the 5.7 percent rate for drugs -- or face harsh sanctions, such as loss of access to the lucrativegovernment market for drugs, said a task force staff member.
NEWS
By Cyril T. Zaneski and Cyril T. Zaneski,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2004
Two government Web sites will lift the veil this week on the mysteries of prescription drug prices. Starting today, Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. will offer price comparisons for the 25 most prescribed medications at 1,200 retail pharmacies at his office's Web site, www.oag.state.md.us. And the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will publish prices of 60,000 drugs at 75,000 pharmacies nationwide at its Web site, www.medicare.gov, on Thursday. Both are aimed at helping people who have no health insurance save money on their medications.
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | May 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's health policy advisers have suggested that the government set guidelines for new drug prices, monitor compliance and reprimand companies whose prices are judged to be excessive.But under heavy lobbying by the drug industry, the administration has apparently backed away from the idea of trying to impose rigid, legally binding controls on drug prices. Prominent Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell, D-Maine, have also expressed distaste for price controls in general.
EXPLORE
August 12, 2011
Editor: It was with a mixture of bemusement and surprise that I read Andy Harris' ad in the Aug. 3 Aegis . He is attempting to portray himself as Medicare's savior. However, I have a letter from Representative Harris dated July 18 in which he supports Representative Ryan's Voucher system for Medicaid. This would in fact decimate the program. The vouchers would pay for a diminishing portion of health insurance premiums and seniors, if they can get coverage at all, would pay increasingly higher percentages for Medicaid care.
NEWS
February 1, 1994
GOP -- Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas said yesterday that Congress would not pass a comprehensive health bill this year "if we don't address it on a bipartisan basis."Speaking to the American Hospital Association, Mr. Dole endorsed President Clinton's goal of providing health insurance coverage for all Americans, but he urged the White House to be flexible and open to compromise. "The administration is attempting to sell price controls and global budgets and government monopolies as answers to very real problems," Mr. Dole said.
NEWS
November 26, 2008
As the nation's president-elect and incoming Congress mull a variety of fixes for the nation's ailing health care system, there's at least one relatively simple step that could be taken to make prescription drugs more affordable for hundreds of thousands of Marylanders. It requires only that the federal government give states the power to enable lower and middle-income families to buy prescription drugs at the same prices paid by the Medicaid program. It wouldn't cost taxpayers a dime but would make prescription drugs 40 percent to 45 percent more affordable for participants.
BUSINESS
By Philadelphia Inquirer | October 9, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- GlaxoSmithKline PLC has named Andrew Witty, head of the firm's European drug business, to succeed outgoing chief executive J.P. Garnier at the end of May. The decision by the board of directors yesterday caps a very public, two-year competition for the top job among Witty and two other executives. The two others were David Stout, president of pharmaceuticals operations, who lives in the Philadelphia area, and Chris Viehbacher, who heads GlaxoSmithKline's U.S. pharmaceuticals operations in Research Triangle Park, N.C. Witty, 43, the youngest of the three, will take responsibility for running the world's second-largest pharmaceutical firm and its pipeline of new drugs, which will be critical to its future.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Johanna Neuman,Los Angeles Times | January 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Defying a presidential veto threat, the House has approved a bill to require federal officials to negotiate with drug companies for lower prices for the 23 million people who have Medicare's prescription drug coverage. Although the bill is unlikely to become law, it will help shape a debate that could result in a more limited measure to allow some dickering between the government and the pharmaceutical industry over drug costs. Supporters of such efforts argue that the vast scale of the Medicare program would result in more significant discounts for prescriptions than private insurers are able to obtain.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | January 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- On the evening before he would be sworn in as the next senator from Maryland, Benjamin L. Cardin's family and friends converged on Washington to celebrate the moment. Cardin, who played on his image as a policy-oriented legislator while campaigning for the office, couldn't resist scheduling a little field trip. He led a group of supporters to the National Archives, where they examined records of appointments to the Supreme Court, challenges between the executive and legislative branches and the first speech George Washington gave to Congress.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
Not by accident has the pharmaceutical industry earned a reputation as one of the most powerful and effective lobbies on Capitol Hill. It's big, it's well connected and it's clever. So it should come as no surprise that the drug lobby is throwing up barriers to block Democrats from honoring their promise to use Medicare's purchasing power to negotiate lower prescription prices for retirees. What's intriguing is the industry tactic of claiming the Medicare prescription drug program is working too well to be touched.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | October 27, 2006
Wal-Mart's $4 generic-prescription program - launched yesterday in Maryland and 11 other states as part of an accelerated rollout - will likely provide price relief for the uninsured, a quick surge in sales and matching deals from other large retailers. Target quickly said yesterday that it will match the price of $4 for a month's supply of pills in all states where Wal-Mart offers it. Kmart has a program - started months before Wal-Mart's - providing some generics at $15 for a three-month supply.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 22, 1994
Drug company executives are crying the blues. Their industry has taken some heavy hits in recent weeks.The General Accounting Office compared drug prices in the United States and Great Britain and found that Americans are paying a lot more for the same medicine. Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., complains that "the U.S. is substantially subsidizing low drug prices for the rest of the world."Congress also accuses the industry of not living up to its promise to keep drug prices in line with inflation.
BUSINESS
By Philadelphia Inquirer | October 9, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- GlaxoSmithKline PLC has named Andrew Witty, head of the firm's European drug business, to succeed outgoing chief executive J.P. Garnier at the end of May. The decision by the board of directors yesterday caps a very public, two-year competition for the top job among Witty and two other executives. The two others were David Stout, president of pharmaceuticals operations, who lives in the Philadelphia area, and Chris Viehbacher, who heads GlaxoSmithKline's U.S. pharmaceuticals operations in Research Triangle Park, N.C. Witty, 43, the youngest of the three, will take responsibility for running the world's second-largest pharmaceutical firm and its pipeline of new drugs, which will be critical to its future.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2006
On Feb. 3, Joyce Elkins filled a prescription for a two-week supply of nitrogen mustard, a decades-old cancer drug used to treat a rare form of lymphoma. The cost was $77.50. On Feb. 17, Elkins, a 64-year-old retiree who lives in Georgetown, Texas, returned to her pharmacy for a refill. This time, after a huge increase in the wholesale price of the drug, the cost was $548.01. Elkins' insurance does not cover nitrogen mustard, which she must take for at least the next six months, at a cost that will now total nearly $7,000.
BUSINESS
BY TRICIA BISHOP and BY TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Four years ago, when Timothy Fagan was 16 and struggling to recover from a nine-hour operation that had replaced his liver and left him severely anemic, doctors prescribed a weekly injectable drug called Epogen to boost his red blood cell count. It nearly killed him. "Several hours after each injection, my son woke up screaming in pain," Fagan's father told a congressional committee last November. "Tim was doubled over crying, screaming, `Help me,' and I didn't know what to do." His doctors, too, were dumbfounded -- until the pharmacy called eight weeks later.
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