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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
Criminal profiling -- glamorized in movies and television and used in high-profile murder and rape cases -- has become a taboo phrase among drug interdiction detectives, tainted by claims of racial and ethnic bias.Developed as a kind of checklist to spot drug couriers, such profiles have been the target of successful lawsuits in Maryland, New Jersey and elsewhere by groups contending that they unfairly target certain groups when it comes to drug searches."The word 'profile' is a loaded term," said Lawrence Sherman, a University of Maryland criminologist who developed a successful gun-seizure program using traffic enforcement techniques similar to ones used by Maryland State Police in drug seizures.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
In more than two decades with the Drug Enforcement Administration, Carl Kotowski had never seen anything like it. At the conclusion of a nine-month heroin task force investigation that led to more than 100 federal agents and Baltimore police officers fanning out yesterday morning and arresting 11 people, authorities made a most unusual find: a woman's purse made entirely of $100 bills. The illegal drug organization was "very unique in some of its concealment," Kotowski, the assistant special agent in charge of the DEA's Baltimore office, said of the suspects' hollowed-out cans of bathroom cleanser and soda cans with secret compartments to store drugs.
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NEWS
April 25, 2001
THE CALLOUS destruction of a small Cessna plane by a Peruvian air force pilot, killing an American missionary and her baby, puts the program of drug interdiction in the Andes in jeopardy. A suspension of CIA surveillance flights in Peru was properly ordered. Congressional support for the aid package Plan Colombia is likely to plummet. This attack was on a flight by an experienced missionary pilot doing what he has done many times. U.S. sources were slow to admit CIA involvement, and then said its agents argued against the attack until further identification could be made.
NEWS
By [Nia-Malika Henderson] | November 19, 2006
Bryan Simonaire Occupation Republican state senator-elect from District 31, in northeastern Anne Arundel County. In the News Simonaire, who campaigned on conservative values, went from trailing his Democratic opponent, former Del. Walter Shandrowsky, by 198 votes to defeating him by 659 votes after absentee and provisional ballots were counted in the hotly contested race to replace retiring Sen. Philip C. Jimeno. Career Highlights Simonaire is a senior systems engineer at Northrop Grumman Corp.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
In the nearly two years since a court order supposedly settled the issue of race-based searches, state police are not prepared to explain why almost three-quarters of the motorists they stop along a northern stretch of Interstate 95 are black.But they insist that the specialized drug interdiction unit near the center of the dispute was disbanded this summer because of financial constraints, not problems with traffic stops.And they vow to fight a contempt motion filed Thursday by the American Civil Liberties Union claiming that state police continue to use race as the sole reason for stopping and searching motorists along a 44-mile stretch of I-95 through Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 1996
PALOS PARK, Ill. -- Declaring that President Clinton had "surrendered" in the war against drugs, Bob Dole vowed yesterday to devote the nation's military capability to halting the influx of drugs and said he would prepare the National Guard to "move in" to combat them."
NEWS
By [Nia-Malika Henderson] | November 19, 2006
Bryan Simonaire Occupation Republican state senator-elect from District 31, in northeastern Anne Arundel County. In the News Simonaire, who campaigned on conservative values, went from trailing his Democratic opponent, former Del. Walter Shandrowsky, by 198 votes to defeating him by 659 votes after absentee and provisional ballots were counted in the hotly contested race to replace retiring Sen. Philip C. Jimeno. Career Highlights Simonaire is a senior systems engineer at Northrop Grumman Corp.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
The hand-held vacuum looks like a Dust Buster, but it collects more than just lint. Call it the drug buster.With this new drug-detection system, called the Ionscan 400, the state is searching for the most minute traces of illegal narcotics on people who visit or work at Maryland's prisons. Officials say it's more accurate than a drug-sniffing dog -- and never gets tired or needs food or exercise."The message we're sending is if you're a bad person and trying to get drugs into our prisons, we're going to catch you," said William W. Sondervan, an assistant commissioner for the state Division of Correction, during a demonstration this week at the Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
In more than two decades with the Drug Enforcement Administration, Carl Kotowski had never seen anything like it. At the conclusion of a nine-month heroin task force investigation that led to more than 100 federal agents and Baltimore police officers fanning out yesterday morning and arresting 11 people, authorities made a most unusual find: a woman's purse made entirely of $100 bills. The illegal drug organization was "very unique in some of its concealment," Kotowski, the assistant special agent in charge of the DEA's Baltimore office, said of the suspects' hollowed-out cans of bathroom cleanser and soda cans with secret compartments to store drugs.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
A top Maryland State Police official has reduced by half a six-member highway anti-drug team in order to cut costs, but he also admitted there was some concern about racial sensitivity by the all-white unit that patrols Interstate 95."Had we not had to reduce the personnel due to the [lack of financial] resources, we probably would've left it the way it was," Lt. Col. Ernest Leatherbury, chief of field operations for the 1,540-officer state police force, said yesterday.State police made the decision several weeks ago to transfer three members of the Special Traffic Interdiction Force to other routine duties after they learned the state Department of Transportation could not afford to support all six members of the anti-drug unit.
NEWS
April 25, 2001
THE CALLOUS destruction of a small Cessna plane by a Peruvian air force pilot, killing an American missionary and her baby, puts the program of drug interdiction in the Andes in jeopardy. A suspension of CIA surveillance flights in Peru was properly ordered. Congressional support for the aid package Plan Colombia is likely to plummet. This attack was on a flight by an experienced missionary pilot doing what he has done many times. U.S. sources were slow to admit CIA involvement, and then said its agents argued against the attack until further identification could be made.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
The hand-held vacuum looks like a Dust Buster, but it collects more than just lint. Call it the drug buster.With this new drug-detection system, called the Ionscan 400, the state is searching for the most minute traces of illegal narcotics on people who visit or work at Maryland's prisons. Officials say it's more accurate than a drug-sniffing dog -- and never gets tired or needs food or exercise."The message we're sending is if you're a bad person and trying to get drugs into our prisons, we're going to catch you," said William W. Sondervan, an assistant commissioner for the state Division of Correction, during a demonstration this week at the Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
Criminal profiling -- glamorized in movies and television and used in high-profile murder and rape cases -- has become a taboo phrase among drug interdiction detectives, tainted by claims of racial and ethnic bias.Developed as a kind of checklist to spot drug couriers, such profiles have been the target of successful lawsuits in Maryland, New Jersey and elsewhere by groups contending that they unfairly target certain groups when it comes to drug searches."The word 'profile' is a loaded term," said Lawrence Sherman, a University of Maryland criminologist who developed a successful gun-seizure program using traffic enforcement techniques similar to ones used by Maryland State Police in drug seizures.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
In the nearly two years since a court order supposedly settled the issue of race-based searches, state police are not prepared to explain why almost three-quarters of the motorists they stop along a northern stretch of Interstate 95 are black.But they insist that the specialized drug interdiction unit near the center of the dispute was disbanded this summer because of financial constraints, not problems with traffic stops.And they vow to fight a contempt motion filed Thursday by the American Civil Liberties Union claiming that state police continue to use race as the sole reason for stopping and searching motorists along a 44-mile stretch of I-95 through Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 1996
PALOS PARK, Ill. -- Declaring that President Clinton had "surrendered" in the war against drugs, Bob Dole vowed yesterday to devote the nation's military capability to halting the influx of drugs and said he would prepare the National Guard to "move in" to combat them."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
A top Maryland State Police official has reduced by half a six-member highway anti-drug team in order to cut costs, but he also admitted there was some concern about racial sensitivity by the all-white unit that patrols Interstate 95."Had we not had to reduce the personnel due to the [lack of financial] resources, we probably would've left it the way it was," Lt. Col. Ernest Leatherbury, chief of field operations for the 1,540-officer state police force, said yesterday.State police made the decision several weeks ago to transfer three members of the Special Traffic Interdiction Force to other routine duties after they learned the state Department of Transportation could not afford to support all six members of the anti-drug unit.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
The courier with the cocaine just might be that young mother balancing a baby on her knee on the southbound train. Or the guy in the business suit, keeping carefully to the speed limit as he drives down Interstate 95. Or the kid playing the Game-boy aboard the New York-to-Baltimore bus.So how do the police catch the couriers?Surprisingly, police say, relatively few Baltimore-bound drug smugglers are caught on the basis of tips from informants. Far more often, state troopers or police detectives pick out someone who is behaving suspiciously, confront them -- and watch them give themselves away with lies, contradictions, or outright confessions.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
With waves of cars and trucks rushing past him on Interstate 95, Tfc. Steven Hohner eyes the traffic from behind the wheel of his unmarked patrol car and declares, "I guarantee you a car with dope or dope money just passed us in the last 30 minutes."It's not an idle claim.Trooper Hohner, 26, is part of a six-man team that roams I-95 between Baltimore and the Delaware line looking for drug smugglers among the 100,000 vehicles that whiz by each day.The team has found quite a few.Last year, Trooper Hohner's drug interdiction team seized 96 pounds of cocaine, 173 pounds of marijuana and $617,740 in alleged drug money, while making 233 drug arrests -- tops in the state.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
With waves of cars and trucks rushing past him on Interstate 95, Tfc. Steven Hohner eyes the traffic from behind the wheel of his unmarked patrol car and declares, "I guarantee you a car with dope or dope money just passed us in the last 30 minutes."It's not an idle claim.Trooper Hohner, 26, is part of a six-man team that roams I-95 between Baltimore and the Delaware line looking for drug smugglers among the 100,000 vehicles that whiz by each day.The team has found quite a few.Last year, Trooper Hohner's drug interdiction team seized 96 pounds of cocaine, 173 pounds of marijuana and $617,740 in alleged drug money, while making 233 drug arrests -- tops in the state.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
The courier with the cocaine just might be that young mother balancing a baby on her knee on the southbound train. Or the guy in the business suit, keeping carefully to the speed limit as he drives down Interstate 95. Or the kid playing the Game-boy aboard the New York-to-Baltimore bus.So how do the police catch the couriers?Surprisingly, police say, relatively few Baltimore-bound drug smugglers are caught on the basis of tips from informants. Far more often, state troopers or police detectives pick out someone who is behaving suspiciously, confront them -- and watch them give themselves away with lies, contradictions, or outright confessions.
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