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By New York Times News Service | August 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The government and the drug industry are near an agreement to require companies to pay fees that would be used by the Food and Drug Administration to hire 600 examiners and speed approval of drugs, officials on both sides said yesterday.The agreement, being worked out by congressional staff members, is intended to resolve what the government and industry have said for the last few years is a catastrophe waiting to happen: The number of drug applications is rapidly increasing, especially because of the boom in biotechnology products, some of which might save lives if they were available.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Not long after Neill Franklin stepped behind a lectern in Annapolis to argue for making marijuana legal, the retired law enforcement officer was fighting tears again. It happens all the time - whenever he pauses to think of the futility of the war on drugs and the lives he says have been wasted. "We've been at this forever," he said. "It never worked. " As a broadening coalition pushes to legalize marijuana in Maryland this year, advocates have turned to Franklin to help sell the idea.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - Over fierce resistance from the drug industry, Congress is moving to authorize research that systematically compares the effectiveness and cost of top-selling prescription drugs. Proponents say that if Medicare is to spend $400 billion on new drug benefits over the next 10 years, it should have objective, reliable information about which medicines are most effective. The House voted last month to provide $12 million to the Public Health Service to conduct "research on the comparative effectiveness" of prescription drugs.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 24, 2013
In the early 1980s, transit officials in Washington couldn't figure out why traffic on the Beltway would grind to a near halt every day around the exact same time. The usual explanations didn't fit. Then it was discovered that a single driver was to blame. Every day on his drive to work, this commuter would plant himself in the left lane and set his cruise control to 55 mph, the posted speed limit, forcing those behind him to merge right, and you can imagine the effects. To his credit, this driver came forward in a letter to the editor of The Washington Post.
NEWS
October 30, 1996
GARY P. JORDAN is not a household name in the country or even in Baltimore. But thanks to him, households with generic drugs can feel more certain that the products will actually work.As the first assistant United States attorney in Baltimore, Mr. Jordan exposed corruption in the generic drug industry, helping to ensure the safety of products that substitute for brand names. He died Friday in his home near Bel Air after a three-year bout with cancer at age 45.Mr. Jordan served as U.S. attorney for four months in 1993, between the terms of Richard D. Bennett, the former federal prosecutor, and current office-holder Lynne Ann Battaglia.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
WASHINGTON - Under pressure from critics in Congress and elsewhere to curb expensive marketing to doctors, the leading drug-industry lobby recommended yesterday that companies stop treating physicians to restaurant meals and other handouts. The industry group, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, said it was revising its voluntary marketing guidelines in order to make sure that sales efforts focus on giving doctors the latest, most accurate information about drugs. However, the new recommendations take aim at practices that are already losing favor and would eliminate only a small fraction of the estimated $20 billion a year the companies spend on marketing to doctors.
BUSINESS
By Tom Hamburger and Tom Hamburger,Tribune Washington Bureau | August 14, 2009
WASHINGTON - -As a candidate for president, Barack Obama criticized drug companies and the influence they wield in Washington. He ran a TV ad targeting the industry's chief lobbyist, former Louisiana Rep. Billy Tauzin, and the role Tauzin played in preventing Medicare from negotiating lower drug prices. Since the election, Tauzin has morphed into the president's partner. He has been invited to the White House a half-dozen times in recent months. There, he says, he secured an agreement that the administration would not try to overturn the Medicare drug policy that Obama had criticized.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
SAN DIEGO - Seated at an oceanfront restaurant in picturesque LaJolla, a group of psychiatrists happily consume a meal featuring foie gras, escargots, white asparagus salad and two bottles of a charming California chardonnay.Their conversation is good-natured, mostly about colleagues and current events. When the table of five receives its $400 bill, a sales representative from one of the nation's largest drug companies scoops it up - as all the doctors fully expected.Will the physicians now prescribe his drugs more often?
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 19, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Drug industry experts and a bipartisan group of legislators in the House of Representatives say the Food and Drug Administration's campaign against importing prescription drugs is intended more to help the drug industry than to protect public health. They accuse the FDA of overstating the health hazards of foreign drugs to help the drug industry defeat legislation legalizing the purchase, or "re-importation," of U.S.-made drugs from Canada and 24 other countries where drugs are less expensive than they are in the United States.
NEWS
June 26, 2011
The Sun article regarding the U.S. Supreme Court and the pharmaceutical industry ("Drug industry tallies 2 high-court victories," June 24), reports how a decision of the court is "shielding the makers of generic drugs from most lawsuits filed by injured patients. " Something is wrong when the incomplete copy of a patented drug is treated better than the original. A patient injured by a generic drug needs some avenue for corrective action. Suing the manufacturer should at least be a patient's last recourse.
NEWS
June 26, 2011
The Sun article regarding the U.S. Supreme Court and the pharmaceutical industry ("Drug industry tallies 2 high-court victories," June 24), reports how a decision of the court is "shielding the makers of generic drugs from most lawsuits filed by injured patients. " Something is wrong when the incomplete copy of a patented drug is treated better than the original. A patient injured by a generic drug needs some avenue for corrective action. Suing the manufacturer should at least be a patient's last recourse.
BUSINESS
By Tom Hamburger and Tom Hamburger,Tribune Washington Bureau | August 14, 2009
WASHINGTON - -As a candidate for president, Barack Obama criticized drug companies and the influence they wield in Washington. He ran a TV ad targeting the industry's chief lobbyist, former Louisiana Rep. Billy Tauzin, and the role Tauzin played in preventing Medicare from negotiating lower drug prices. Since the election, Tauzin has morphed into the president's partner. He has been invited to the White House a half-dozen times in recent months. There, he says, he secured an agreement that the administration would not try to overturn the Medicare drug policy that Obama had criticized.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
WASHINGTON - Under pressure from critics in Congress and elsewhere to curb expensive marketing to doctors, the leading drug-industry lobby recommended yesterday that companies stop treating physicians to restaurant meals and other handouts. The industry group, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, said it was revising its voluntary marketing guidelines in order to make sure that sales efforts focus on giving doctors the latest, most accurate information about drugs. However, the new recommendations take aim at practices that are already losing favor and would eliminate only a small fraction of the estimated $20 billion a year the companies spend on marketing to doctors.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate overwhelmingly approved a landmark drug safety bill yesterday, doubling the number of government scientists assigned to ferret out risky side effects in medicines on the market. It would create a computerized network to scan medical insurance and pharmacy records for signs of trouble with new drugs and would significantly expand the Food and Drug Administration's power to require drugmakers to reduce risks. "This is unquestionably the biggest change in the FDA's regulatory authority in a very long time," said former FDA Commissioner Mark McClellan.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate, clearing the way for action on a major overhaul of the government's troubled drug safety system, has sidetracked a controversial amendment that would have let Americans buy medicines from foreign suppliers but threatened to stall action on the larger bill. The drug import measure, which was tacked onto the FDA overhaul, could have saved consumers billions of dollars, its sponsors said. But the pharmaceutical industry has argued that pharmacies risk being flooded with counterfeit drugs.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 26, 2007
Nearly 95 percent of physicians in the United States receive free food, beverages, drug samples, sports tickets or other benefits from drug company sales representatives eager to influence their prescribing habits, according to a report today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Family practice physicians, who prescribe a broad range of drugs, were more likely to receive visits and gifts from sales representatives than are other specialist groups involved in the survey, researchers said.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
IN A SHAMEFUL display of manipulation, the pharmaceutical industry trotted out ailing celebrities last week to help lobby against legislation designed to increase competition from generic drugs. Talk-show host Montel Williams, who has multiple sclerosis, was among those voicing the drug industry's message that any effort to curb its profits would dim the hopes of people waiting for cures and treatments for such diseases that might otherwise come from new research. While the occasion marked a new low in tactics, the refrain was very familiar.
NEWS
July 5, 2004
TO SEE WHY health costs are spiraling out of control, look in the medicine cabinet. Drug prices rise rapidly and unchecked, putting an increasingly unsustainable burden on health insurance. And how does the pharmaceutical industry spend a huge chunk of its profits? On hawking drugs to physicians and consumers in order to boost the use of expensive medicines, thus burdening the health insurance system even further. Over more than a dozen years of heated debate in Washington, drugmakers have steadfastly resisted all encroachments on their fat profit margins, warning of dire consequences.
BUSINESS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,Los Angeles Times | April 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Drugmakers spent $155 million lobbying the federal government from 2005 to mid-2006, setting a record that they could outdo this year as Congress considers high stakes legislation for the industry and for consumers, a public interest group said yesterday in a report. Researchers at the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity said the drug industry spent nearly $111 million on lobbying in 2005, a record for the sector in any one year. The record pace appeared to be sustained in the first half of 2006, the report said.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Federal health officials want to alter the foundations of the system entrusted with making sure new drugs are safe and effective. By streamlining the way scientists determine a new drug's safety and effectiveness, advocates say, new cures can be delivered to dying patients much more quickly. But many scientists outside Washington say this effort, spearheaded by the Bush administration and drug companies, could rush new treatments to market too quickly - and wind up hurting rather than helping patients.
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