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Drug Free Zones

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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | February 13, 1993
Maryland's highest court has dismissed charges against a man arrested for loitering and drug violations in a "drug-free zone" in Baltimore but delayed a decision on whether the city's zones are constitutional.The Maryland Court of Appeals' decision on Wednesday came two days after the high court upheld a separate state law setting up drug-free zones within 1,000 feet of schools in Maryland.Baltimore's ordinance provides for misdemeanor penalties against anyone loitering to sell narcotics in areas designated as drug-free zones.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,rick.maese@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
BEIJING - Four years ago in Athens, 26 Olympians tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs, which most agree was only a fraction of those who had artificial help gushing through their bloodstream. This weekend in China, Ukrainian weightlifter Igor Razoronov submitted a dirty test. He was just the sixth athlete busted at these Summer Games, representing quite a falloff from the 2004 total. There really aren't a whole lot of conclusions for us to draw here. The athletes have either been scared clean, or they've stayed ahead of the drug testers.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1998
Fed up with illegal drug markets in his district, a West Baltimore councilman called on city police and state prosecutors yesterday to determine whether "drug-free zones" are working.Established in 1989 during the "just say no to drugs" movement, the law, which allows police to search and arrest loiterers, has been questioned on constitutional grounds by judges and prosecutors.Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. called for the study of the law while standing in a drug-free zone established at Pennsylvania and North avenues.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | January 24, 2007
Stepping up efforts to curb drug activity throughout Annapolis, the city council is backing a House of Delegates bill that would allow the entire city to be designated as a drug-free zone with stiffer penalties for convicted dealers. The council unanimously passed the resolution, which was sponsored by Alderwoman Julie Stankivic, the Ward 6 independent, on Monday night. It expands on a council resolution last year that supported letting the city classify areas around school bus stops, Head Start facilities and public housing properties as drug-free zones.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
The Schmoke administration is working to revise the city's drug-free zone law, saying that the measure sometimes is a detriment to law enforcement, rather than the drug-fighting tool envisioned when it was enacted in 1989."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1999
Baltimore City Council will return from its holiday recess tonight to broadcast its first meeting over the Internet, when members will introduce legislation to save the city's drug-free zones.Last year, Council President Lawrence A. Bell III spent $150,000 on the high-tech information system that includes digital cameras in the council chambers. Previously,the council relied on camera operators and the city's cable channel to transmit meetings.Despite criticism for the spending while the city faces a $25 million budget shortfall next year, Bell has called the technical addition a revolutionary step in public access that makes Baltimore one of the first cyberspace councils in the nation.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Baltimore failed to prosecute almost all the people arrested in drug-free zones during the first nine months of this year, a West Baltimore councilman's research shows.Fed up with illegal drug markets in his 4th District, Democratic Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. in May vowed to determine whether "drug-free zones" are working.A law established in 1989, during the "Just say no to drugs" movement, allows police to search and arrest loiterers in designated drug-free zones. The zones tend to be located around schools and high crime areas.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 11, 2006
In an effort to expand the city's drug-free zones, the Annapolis city council unanimously passed a resolution yesterday that would allow the city to include school bus stops, Head Start facilities and public housing among the designated areas. Currently, drug-free zones in Maryland are around schools. They allow courts to double a normal sentence for people convicted of distributing drugs in those areas. Aldermen said that creating more drug-free zones would be like giving judges and prosecutors "another tool in the toolbox."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1999
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will ask the City Council to eliminate Baltimore's "drug-free zones" law because city prosecutors and judges did not uphold it.Schmoke will make the request on behalf of Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, who wants the council to help devise legislation that would allow officers to more effectively seize illegal guns and drugs.The council established 50 drug-free zones in 1989 during the "Just say no to drugs" movement. In the zones, located around schools and high-crime areas, police are allowed to search and arrest loiterers.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | February 17, 1991
A spokesman for the county's volunteer fire companies asked a House committee Wednesday to include Carroll's fire carnival grounds in a bill that would extend drug-free zones to community recreation centers.Eugene Curfman, legislative chairman for the Carroll Volunteer Firemen's Association, requested that the amendment be added to a billsponsored by Delegate Rose Lee Blumenthal, D-Prince George's, that seeks to protect children and senior citizens from drug dealers.Several years ago, the General Assembly passed a law imposing stiffer penalties on those convicted of drug-related offenses within 1,000 feet of public school grounds, called drug-free school zones.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 11, 2006
In an effort to expand the city's drug-free zones, the Annapolis city council unanimously passed a resolution yesterday that would allow the city to include school bus stops, Head Start facilities and public housing among the designated areas. Currently, drug-free zones in Maryland are around schools. They allow courts to double a normal sentence for people convicted of distributing drugs in those areas. Aldermen said that creating more drug-free zones would be like giving judges and prosecutors "another tool in the toolbox."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
Annapolis Alderman Herbert H. McMillan announced radical changes yesterday in his anti-loitering bill, including an amendment requiring neighborhoods to seek drug-free zone designation before police could enforce it in their communities.If the bill is approved next month, Annapolitans will have to apply at City Hall for "Drug-Loitering Free Zone" status. Only then could officers ask loiterers suspected of drug activity in the designated communities to move along or face arrest.McMillan, a Ward 5 Republican, introduced the bill in May after hearing complaints from Neighborhood Watch leaders that police could not move suspected drug dealers from public housing community sidewalks, which are the property of the Annapolis Housing Authority, a private entity.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
Annapolis Alderman Herbert H. McMillan announced radical changes yesterday in his anti-loitering bill, including an amendment requiring neighborhoods to seek drug-free zone designation before police could enforce it in their communities.If the bill is approved next month, Annapolitans will have to apply at City Hall for "Drug-Loitering Free Zone" status. Only then could officers ask loiterers suspected of drug activity in the designated communities to move along or face arrest.McMillan, a Ward 5 Republican, introduced the bill in May after hearing complaints from Neighborhood Watch leaders that police could not move suspected drug dealers from public housing community sidewalks, which are the property of the Annapolis Housing Authority, a private entity.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1999
Baltimore City Council will return from its holiday recess tonight to broadcast its first meeting over the Internet, when members will introduce legislation to save the city's drug-free zones.Last year, Council President Lawrence A. Bell III spent $150,000 on the high-tech information system that includes digital cameras in the council chambers. Previously,the council relied on camera operators and the city's cable channel to transmit meetings.Despite criticism for the spending while the city faces a $25 million budget shortfall next year, Bell has called the technical addition a revolutionary step in public access that makes Baltimore one of the first cyberspace councils in the nation.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1999
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will ask the City Council to eliminate Baltimore's "drug-free zones" law because city prosecutors and judges did not uphold it.Schmoke will make the request on behalf of Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, who wants the council to help devise legislation that would allow officers to more effectively seize illegal guns and drugs.The council established 50 drug-free zones in 1989 during the "Just say no to drugs" movement. In the zones, located around schools and high-crime areas, police are allowed to search and arrest loiterers.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Baltimore failed to prosecute almost all the people arrested in drug-free zones during the first nine months of this year, a West Baltimore councilman's research shows.Fed up with illegal drug markets in his 4th District, Democratic Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. in May vowed to determine whether "drug-free zones" are working.A law established in 1989, during the "Just say no to drugs" movement, allows police to search and arrest loiterers in designated drug-free zones. The zones tend to be located around schools and high crime areas.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 9, 1990
Twenty-three people, including three juveniles, were arrested last night as officers swept through drug-free zones in three police districts.Those arrested were charged with possession of narcotics or loitering in a drug-free zone with intent to traffic in narcotics, said Sgt. J.C. Smith, who heads the narcotics squad in the Southwestern District.The other districts were the Western and the Southern.Smith said the police sweeps were prompted by numerous resident complaints of alleged drug activity in the zones that have signs posted warning that any one frequenting the area for the purpose of dealing in narcotics will be arrested.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 9, 1990
Twenty-three people, including three juveniles, were arrested last night as officers swept through drug-free zones in three police districts.Those arrested were charged with possession of narcotics or loitering in a drug-free zone with intent to traffic in narcotics, said Sgt. J.C. Smith, who heads the narcotics squad in the Southwestern District.The other districts were the Western and the Southern.Smith said the police sweeps were prompted by numerous resident complaints of alleged drug activity in the zones that have signs posted warning that any one frequenting the area for the purpose of dealing in narcotics will be arrested.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1998
Fed up with illegal drug markets in his district, a West Baltimore councilman called on city police and state prosecutors yesterday to determine whether "drug-free zones" are working.Established in 1989 during the "just say no to drugs" movement, the law, which allows police to search and arrest loiterers, has been questioned on constitutional grounds by judges and prosecutors.Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. called for the study of the law while standing in a drug-free zone established at Pennsylvania and North avenues.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
To make it tougher for drug dealers to operate, several City Council members want to eliminate push-button pay phones in Baltimore's drug-free zones.Councilman Lawrence A. Bell III says the idea behind the proposed legislation, which would require public phones in those areas to have rotary dials, is simple."
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