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NEWS
November 26, 1996
An article in Thursday's Maryland section incorrectly identified the Carter Braxton Chapter where a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration official spoke.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 11/26/96
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
George B. Brosan, a career law enforcement officer who had served as Maryland State Police superintendent, died Thursday of cancer at his Annapolis home. He was 78. "He was a titan in both attitude and influence, and had a splendid career in law enforcement," said Cornelius J. Behan, retired Baltimore County police chief. "He was devoted to his family and he was devoted to the job. He brought integrity to his work and the agency by respecting the rules and the rule of law. " "George was as honest as can be and his integrity was never questioned," said Frank Panessa of Annapolis, who had worked with Mr. Brosan at the U.S. Customs Service as well as the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which became the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 24, 2013
Synthetic drugs, sexting, prescription drug abuse and Internet safety are among the many topics that will be discussed at Harford County's Annual Symposium on Drug Prevention, Intervention and Treatment this Wednesday, June 26. The daylong symposium will be held from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Patterson Mill High School, 85 Patterson Mill Road in Bel Air. The Annual Symposium on Drug Prevention, Intervention and Treatment focuses on relevant and...
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Law enforcement agencies across Maryland have launched a joint investigation to find the source of a deadly variant of heroin that has claimed dozens of lives in recent months and sent outreach workers scrambling to warn addicts. Authorities say the powerful mixture of heroin and the synthetic opiate fentanyl has also turned up in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. In Maryland, they say, they have been caught off guard by the scale of the problem. For months, health workers, drug users and police have caught glimpses of the cocktail and the damage it has caused.
NEWS
By Stan Rappaport | October 25, 2013
There will be 10 locations in Howard County for residents to participate in the Drug Enforcement Administration's National Take Back Initiative on Saturday, Oct. 26. The event, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., allows citizens to dispose of unwanted prescriptions, both controlled and non-controlled, and over-the-counter medications safely and anonymously. The HC DrugFree office in the Wilde Lake Village Center in Columbia will be the only site collecting syringes and needles. Here are the drop-off locations: • Northern District Police Station, 3410 Court House Drive, Ellicott City • Southern District Police Station, 11226 Scaggsville Road, Laurel • Wilde Lake Village HC DrugFree, 10451 Twin Rivers Road, Suite 404, Columbia • Harper's Choice Community Policing Office, 5485 Harpers Farm Road, Columbia • Oakland Mills Police Satellite Office, 5820 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia • Long Reach Police Satellite Office, 8775 Cloudleap Court, Columbia • Owen Brown Police Satellite Office, 7154 Cradlerock Way, Columbia • North Laurel Police Satellite Office, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road, Laurel • Gary J. Arthur Community Center, 2400 Rt. 97, Cooksville • Maryland State Police Waterloo Barrack, 7777 Washington Boulevard, Jessup
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1999
After 39 years in law enforcement, Thomas Constantine announced yesterday that he would step down as the administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration.Constantine, 60, said his decision was not motivated by political considerations. He said he wants to return to New York and spend more time with his family. But he has disagreed, sometimes forcefully, with the Clinton administration's portrayal of Mexico as a full ally in fighting the flow of drugs into the United States.In February, Constantine asserted that Mexican drug trafficking organizations posed the worst criminal threat to the nation that he had seen in nearly 40 years in law enforcement.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Authorities charged 17 alleged members of a West Baltimore cocaine and heroin ring that used distinctive yellow and green packaging for its product, the State's Attorney's Office said Wednesday. Three men were charged in federal court and had their initial appearances before a judge in the afternoon. Of the 14 others, 9 were arrested Wednesday in a series of raids that police said hit multiple places around Baltimore. The drug ring operated in the Gilmor Homes public housing project and the case was developed by the Baltimore police and Drug Enforcement Administration using wiretaps, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Walter S. "Bud" Fialkewicz, who had worked as an agent supervisor for the Drug Enforcement Administration, died Aug. 28 of a heart attack at a grandson's home in Coral Gables, Fla. He was 86 and lived in Silver Spring. The son of a baker and a homemaker, Walter Stanley Fialkewicz was born in Baltimore and raised on East Pratt Street in Highlandtown. He was a graduate of Patterson Park High School, and from 1944 to 1946 served as an Army Air Corps tail gunner. Mr. Fialkewicz remained in the Army Reserve, where he attained the rank of major.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Law enforcement agencies across Maryland have launched a joint investigation to find the source of a deadly variant of heroin that has claimed dozens of lives in recent months and sent outreach workers scrambling to warn addicts. Authorities say the powerful mixture of heroin and the synthetic opiate fentanyl has also turned up in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. In Maryland, they say, they have been caught off guard by the scale of the problem. For months, health workers, drug users and police have caught glimpses of the cocktail and the damage it has caused.
NEWS
February 17, 1992
Disarray in federal drug policy is dismaying, when the violence and human waste of drug abuse are plain for all to see. Instead of turf wars between federal agencies and disputes between the White House and Pentagon over the proper role of military power, the country needs leadership.There are serious questions about involving U.S. military personnel in police work, to be sure. It is one thing to use Navy ships to haul Coast Guard law-enforcement detachments to halt drugs at sea and Air Force planes to help Drug Enforcement Administration agents bring down drug transports.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Authorities charged 17 alleged members of a West Baltimore cocaine and heroin ring that used distinctive yellow and green packaging for its product, the State's Attorney's Office said Wednesday. Three men were charged in federal court and had their initial appearances before a judge in the afternoon. Of the 14 others, 9 were arrested Wednesday in a series of raids that police said hit multiple places around Baltimore. The drug ring operated in the Gilmor Homes public housing project and the case was developed by the Baltimore police and Drug Enforcement Administration using wiretaps, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Stan Rappaport | October 25, 2013
There will be 10 locations in Howard County for residents to participate in the Drug Enforcement Administration's National Take Back Initiative on Saturday, Oct. 26. The event, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., allows citizens to dispose of unwanted prescriptions, both controlled and non-controlled, and over-the-counter medications safely and anonymously. The HC DrugFree office in the Wilde Lake Village Center in Columbia will be the only site collecting syringes and needles. Here are the drop-off locations: • Northern District Police Station, 3410 Court House Drive, Ellicott City • Southern District Police Station, 11226 Scaggsville Road, Laurel • Wilde Lake Village HC DrugFree, 10451 Twin Rivers Road, Suite 404, Columbia • Harper's Choice Community Policing Office, 5485 Harpers Farm Road, Columbia • Oakland Mills Police Satellite Office, 5820 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia • Long Reach Police Satellite Office, 8775 Cloudleap Court, Columbia • Owen Brown Police Satellite Office, 7154 Cradlerock Way, Columbia • North Laurel Police Satellite Office, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road, Laurel • Gary J. Arthur Community Center, 2400 Rt. 97, Cooksville • Maryland State Police Waterloo Barrack, 7777 Washington Boulevard, Jessup
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 24, 2013
Synthetic drugs, sexting, prescription drug abuse and Internet safety are among the many topics that will be discussed at Harford County's Annual Symposium on Drug Prevention, Intervention and Treatment this Wednesday, June 26. The daylong symposium will be held from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Patterson Mill High School, 85 Patterson Mill Road in Bel Air. The Annual Symposium on Drug Prevention, Intervention and Treatment focuses on relevant and...
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 7, 2013
Nearly 1,800 pounds of unused and expired medication was turned in Harford County by more than 500 people during the Nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 27. The 1,782 pounds of medicine turned in was properly disposed of and destroyed. This effort will significantly help in addressing the alarming rate of drug overdoses relating to prescription and over-the-counter medicines, county officials said. Nationally, an estimated 6.2 million Americans over the age of 12 years old reported misusing prescription drugs.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 27, 2013
Let me start with this: If not for the absurd war on drugs — by far, the nation's longest war — we would not have had so many killings on the streets of Baltimore over the years. The United States leads the world in incarceration. Without the war on drugs, thousands of men and women would be home with their families instead of in cellblocks; they might even be employed. There would be less social dysfunction and community upheaval. There would be less crime overall. If not for the war on drugs, now in its fifth decade, we would not have gangsters, like the reputed Black Guerrilla Family leaders Eric Brown and Tavon White.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Walter S. "Bud" Fialkewicz, who had worked as an agent supervisor for the Drug Enforcement Administration, died Aug. 28 of a heart attack at a grandson's home in Coral Gables, Fla. He was 86 and lived in Silver Spring. The son of a baker and a homemaker, Walter Stanley Fialkewicz was born in Baltimore and raised on East Pratt Street in Highlandtown. He was a graduate of Patterson Park High School, and from 1944 to 1946 served as an Army Air Corps tail gunner. Mr. Fialkewicz remained in the Army Reserve, where he attained the rank of major.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 7, 2013
Nearly 1,800 pounds of unused and expired medication was turned in Harford County by more than 500 people during the Nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 27. The 1,782 pounds of medicine turned in was properly disposed of and destroyed. This effort will significantly help in addressing the alarming rate of drug overdoses relating to prescription and over-the-counter medicines, county officials said. Nationally, an estimated 6.2 million Americans over the age of 12 years old reported misusing prescription drugs.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
He went by the name "Preacherman," according to federal law enforcement authorities, and he made his living on the streets of East Baltimore robbing drug dealers and selling the stolen merchandise himself. It's a perilous way to spend one's day. Someone once dared rob "Preacherman," and, according to a federal indictment unsealed last week, he bragged to a police informant that he shot and killed the robbery suspect, Donte Vandiver, on Belnord Avenue on May 24. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says in court documents filed last week that "Preacherman" is 27-year-old Tyrell Smith.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
He went by the name "Preacherman," according to federal law enforcement authorities, and he made his living on the streets of East Baltimore robbing drug dealers and selling the stolen merchandise himself. It's a perilous way to spend one's day. Someone once dared rob "Preacherman," and, according to a federal indictment unsealed last week, he bragged to a police informant that he shot and killed the robbery suspect, Donte Vandiver, on Belnord Avenue on May 24. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says in court documents filed last week that "Preacherman" is 27-year-old Tyrell Smith.
NEWS
By Robert Weiner and Zoe Pagonis | July 27, 2009
In Baltimore last week, new U.S. drug czar Gil Kerlikowske made the case for expansion of drug courts to treat rather than imprison addicts and called for drugs to be considered a "public health crisis." Why, then, is the Obama administration proposing to spend an even higher percentage of its anti-drug resources on law enforcement than the administration of George W. Bush? Nowhere are these issues more resonant than in Baltimore. Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, a star of HBO's The Wire and a native of the city, said that her mother stole clothes off of her body for drug money and locked her in a closet.
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