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January 24, 2012
Editor: I attended that County Executive's budget hearing held at Havre de Grace High School last week during which several people spoke in favor of the Harford County Public Schools teaching a drug awareness program. At the end of the hearing, the County Executive and Mary Chance, a member of his budget committee, addressed the audience stating they have tried to bring drug and alcohol abuse education back into the public schools, but have met resistance from the school system.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
In the wake of recent deaths linked to electronic dance music events, attendees at Baltimore's first Moonrise Festival said the shows themselves should not be made a scapegoat. Police and fire officials reported no major incidents Saturday at the Moonrise Festival, which continues Sunday. Last weekend, two people, ages 20 and 17, died of what police called suspected drug overdoses after attending the Mad Decent Block Party, which was held at the Merriweather Post Pavilion in Howard County.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
The University of Maryland Medical Center has struck an agreement with the Center for Health Information, a Virginia-based company specializing in geriatrics and drug education, to provide drug information for health care customers.In return, CHI will underwrite a drug information residency position at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.The University of Maryland joins two other university-affiliated pharmacy programs in the CHI venture, named the Drug Information Network.Other institutions signed on are the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston and North Carolina Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
Your recent editorial, "The Harris boycott" (July 7) put far too much emphasis on the politics and not enough on what really matters. The Washington, D.C., City Council has just passed the most lenient marijuana decriminalization law in the nation, with a $25 fine that is not only less than the average traffic ticket but involves no point system. Do we really want the capital of our nation and mecca for family tourism to go down this path? The data show that states with lenient decriminalization laws have higher rates of youth use, as reported to the Centers for Disease Control, than those that have stricter decriminalization with higher civil penalties for the first offense, increasing penalties for repeat offenders, and/or requirements for drug education.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | August 30, 1991
More than 100 Baltimore County high school teachers met at the Holiday Inn in Timonium yesterday to discuss an addition to the county's curriculum that officials hope will send a clear message to high school students regarding drug abuse.The curriculum, which was written by teachers in 1990, will incorporate drug education into students' regular social studies classes. Ninth-graders will learn about drugs and their relationship with government roles and social behavior, while 12th-graders will study moral and public policy issues related to drugs.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 1996
SEATTLE -- Heroin fatalities here rose 294 percent from 1985 to 1995. A survey showed 88 percent of high school students had tried alcohol or other drugs.What's a city to do? In Seattle this fall, the Police Department canceled its primary drug education program in the schools, DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education). Spokane had pulled out a few weeks earlier.The two cancellations are the latest and most prominent in a trickle of defections from the popular Los Angeles-founded program that sends uniformed officers into three-fourths of the Unites States' school districts to teach youngsters how to say no drugs, gangs and violence.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 16, 1998
The 40 southwest Baltimore County children gathered yesterday at St. Clement's Church in Lansdowne for basketball, arts and crafts -- and a video depicting a 10-year-old boy being accidentally shot to death by his friend.The video and the discussion it sparked are part of a weeklong day camp sponsored by Baltimore County Police with a curriculum that focuses on drug education and ways to settle disputes without violence.Modeled after similar programs across the country, the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE)
NEWS
By Julia Kim Leff | May 12, 2014
Last month, when Gov. Martin O'Malley passed historic legislation to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana, Maryland was abuzz. Politicians, the media, advocates and critics voiced their opinions (both supporting and opposing the bill) loud and clear. But there was a critical voice missing from this conversation: the voice of a teenager. It's widely understood that decriminalization is the first step toward legalization, and teens understand all too well how this will play out in conversations at the dinner table and in drug education classrooms at school.
NEWS
October 29, 1993
THIS JUST IN from Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard pre-med students got an unexpected lesson in anatomy, when three naked men believed to be from Princeton streaked through their chemistry classes."
NEWS
By JONATHAN ZIMMERMAN | June 14, 1991
Like every other state, Vermont mandates that its publicschools provide ''drug and alcohol education.'' When I taught social studies there, a good chunk of our annual in-service training day was devoted to the subject.At the podium stood a substance-abuse counselor, a stock character at such ceremonies. In somber tones, he listed several key ''warning signs'' of adolescent drug use: irritability, ''amotivational syndrome,'' and -- a perennial favorite -- poor self-esteem. In the great drug-theory drag-race, what educators call an ''individual deficiency model'' of youth behavior (low self-esteem makes kids get high)
NEWS
By Julia Kim Leff | May 12, 2014
Last month, when Gov. Martin O'Malley passed historic legislation to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana, Maryland was abuzz. Politicians, the media, advocates and critics voiced their opinions (both supporting and opposing the bill) loud and clear. But there was a critical voice missing from this conversation: the voice of a teenager. It's widely understood that decriminalization is the first step toward legalization, and teens understand all too well how this will play out in conversations at the dinner table and in drug education classrooms at school.
NEWS
By Andy Harris | March 31, 2014
Last week, the Maryland Senate approved Senate Bill 364, which would "decriminalize" possession of marijuana. The Senate bill, which passed 36 to 8, would remove criminal penalties for possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana and impose small civil fines, with a provision for the judge to order drug education only after the third offense. The bill has gone to the House of Delegates, where a hearing is scheduled for Tuesday. One could argue that people whose only crime is smoking or possessing a small amount of marijuana should not be punished with an arrest record, which could destroy their chances of getting a job and other benefits later in life.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
As the federal government shifts its drug control strategy toward drug treatment and education initiatives, the U.S. drug czar said Wednesday at an event in Baltimore that he plans to emphasize the expansion of drug courts to divert nonviolent offenders to treatment instead of prison. Gil Kerlikowske, director of national drug control policy, announced the changes at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine as he laid out his goals for the year. The former Seattle police chief said there would be no official change in the federal stance that marijuana is an illegal and harmful drug, a hot issue since two states voted to allow its use last year.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 14, 2013
In response to a 2010 Youth Commission Survey, in which 49 percent of youth in grades six to 12 indicated they feel strongly that alcohol and drug abuse educational program and initiatives are needed, the Harford County Department of Community Services launched the new prevention program, Above the Influence Alcohol and Drug Education Program, in January. The Above the Influence Alcohol & Drug Education Program was attended by eight Harford County youth. The morning portion of the program focused on alcohol education and featured a victim impact speaker, a discussion on the effects of alcohol and drug use on the family, as well as some interactive activities.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Cortly "C.D. " Witherspoon, a Baltimore minister and activist, has been scoping out convenience stores that sell products such as "Scooby Snax. " The glossy package features a picture of a dazed-looking cartoon character, Scooby Doo. A sticker advises that the contents have a blueberry flavor, though the package contains dried herbs, not candy. The minister's mission has been to get such products out of the hands of Baltimore's youth, who are smoking the stuff in hopes of getting high.
EXPLORE
January 24, 2012
Editor: I attended that County Executive's budget hearing held at Havre de Grace High School last week during which several people spoke in favor of the Harford County Public Schools teaching a drug awareness program. At the end of the hearing, the County Executive and Mary Chance, a member of his budget committee, addressed the audience stating they have tried to bring drug and alcohol abuse education back into the public schools, but have met resistance from the school system.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | June 9, 1991
WESTMINSTER - As the county's drug prevention coordinator a few years ago, Joanne Hayes saw a real need for a similar position in the Carroll school system.The district, she believed, needed someone to coordinate the many community and school drug education and prevention programs that had evolved since the nation declared war on drugs."A lot of ideas make sense," said Hayes, the mother of three adult children. "But not many are carried out."The idea of a coordinator in the schools, however, has been carried out.With money from a federal Drug Free Schools grant, Carroll hired Hayes last summer to be its substance abuse prevention school/community coordinator.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
In America in the '90s it's practically a given: In addition to reading, writing and arithmetic, schools are expected to teach children about drugs.But how effective are school-based drug education and prevention programs? Should you enroll your child in one?According to Harold E. Shinitzky, a psychologist with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, school-based programs are definitely worthwhile -- but only if parents and school administrators have made the right choices."You've probably heard this before: For every dollar spent on drug treatment you save $12 of cost to society," says Shinitzky.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2004
The police officer is in full uniform, with radios strapped to his belt and a handgun in his holster. He stands alert at the entrance to a Baltimore County high school, scanning the faces of the teenagers streaming past. He spots someone. "Hey, there," he says to a senior girl, his imposing posture melting into an embrace. "Welcome back. You excited about school?" This is Officer Tony Barr, and this, Parkville High School, is his beat. His job means that he's a part-time teacher, a part-time counselor - and a full-time peace officer.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2001
Sitting elbow to elbow with President Bush yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening warned that his proposed $1.6 trillion tax cut over 10 years was too large and would harm education programs and prescription drug coverage. His remarks, broadcast live on national television from the East Room of the White House where the National Governors' Association met with the president, came on the eve of Bush's first budget presentation to Congress. The timing was lost on no one, least of all Bush, who spoke before Glendening and softly lobbied the governors to endorse his tax plan.
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