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Drug Dealer

NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Anyone seeking to purchase a gun — even those buying weapons at a show or through a private dealer — should be required to pass a background check through a national database, according to recommendations drafted by a panel of violence reduction experts convened by the Johns Hopkins University. "It is really indefensible that we have a system where someone is able to obtain a firearm with no background check or record-keeping," said Daniel Webster, director of the Center for Gun Policy and Research at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
The word of the week, "hope," was written on a whiteboard for East Baltimore students - part of an after-school program on the site where an arsonist killed Angela Dawson, her husband and five of their children a decade ago. The children who come to the Dawson Family Safe Haven won't run into trouble like that, organizers say, not if their plan works. "Standing here now you can hear children laughing and talking," said Pamela V. Carter, a former city councilwoman who runs the programs in the home that was set afire by a drug dealer in retaliation for Dawson's complaints to police.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 7, 2012
Kemba Smith Pradia went to Tallahassee, Fla., last week to demand the right to vote. Back in the '90s, when she was just Kemba Smith, she became a poster child for the excesses and inanities of the so-called War on Drugs. Ms. Pradia, then a college student in Virginia, became involved with, and terrorized by, a man who choked and punched her regularly and viciously. By the impenetrable logic of battered women, she thought it was her fault. The boyfriend was a drug dealer. Pradia never handled drugs, never used drugs, never sold drugs.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Sun reporter | September 17, 2012
Responding to criticism, Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein said prosecutors are often in favor of tougher penalties than those handed down by city judges, who have the final say.  Bernstein's comment came after a "court watcher" from North Baltimore, Stephen Gewirtz, sent an e-mail blast to residents describing sentencing of a 54-year-old man named Lonnie Butler, who pleaded guilty Monday to selling heroin in Better Waverly. He received a sentence of seven years, but Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams suspended all but two years and gave Butler credit for time served.  Resident Andrew Timleck sent a reply to the e-mail recipient criticizing the sentence, saying Butler had a lengthy record of charges stretching back 22 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Hiaasen | August 6, 2012
Little Boxes on the hillside, little boxes filled with sticky weed. Little boxes on the hillside, little boxes will get you high. When Nancy looks for work, she remembers to leave brick dancer, soccer mom drug dealer, arsonist, and most hardcore MILF off her resume. Meanwhile, her sister Jill is pregnant. Hopefully not with Doug's baby, and when I say "hopefully," I am quoting her. Andy has been parenting Nancy's children, then Jill's creepy twins, and even Nancy and Jill themselves.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
An alleged Baltimore contract killer who went by the street name "Tony Montana" is in federal custody after authorities say he agreed to execute the associate of an apparent drug dealer — who was actually an undercover FBI agent. Court documents outline a series of meetings between 46-year-old Antonio McKiver and the agent, during which conversations were recorded detailing how McKiver would take out the target in exchange for $15,000 and a kilogram of cocaine. "That ain't no problem," McKiver allegedly said in one conversation, according to court records.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 4, 2012
Seven years ago this week, I put out a plea to the drug dealers of Baltimore to stop killing each other and to give me a call (at 410-332-6166) if they'd like help finding legitimate work. The phone started ringing immediately, and it rang for months, and then years. Drug dealers were among the callers. However, the vast majority were men who had been incarcerated for a whole range of offenses but who now couldn't find work. And it wasn't for lack of trying. Too many employers, they said, refused to hire someone with a criminal record.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Six weeks after Scott M. Greenberg was found shot to death in his parents' house in Owings Mills in August, 2009, police arrested Gerald E. Sears and charged him with murder, robbery and drug-dealing. Police never found the murder weapon, or the wallet, bank card and cell phone they claim Sears took from Greenberg. Nor did they find Sears' fingerprints or DNA in the house. What they did get were cell phone records, Sears' admission that he'd been in the house to sell crack cocaine, and no sign the house on Velvet Valley Way had been ransacked by a burglar.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 12, 2012
Two city drug dealers have been sentenced to prison in separate cases, including one who police said dealt cocaine in a small neighborhood in Northeast Baltimore called the 4X4, according to federal prosecutors. In that case, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office said that 30-year-old Tony Robinson, known by "Peterman" and "Pete," was part of a drug group from June 2009 through August 2010 in the area between Edison Highway and Belair Road. Prosecutors said that Robinson pleaded guilty in the case in which he sold 280 grams of cocaine and 5 kilograms of powder cocaine.
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