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Drug Dealer

NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts claimed Thursday that the agency's decision to stop notifying citizens of reported shootings over Twitter was never official policy and he would have vetoed it if it had been brought to him.  Speaking at an LGBT forum, The Sun's Kevin Rector reports that Batts said the idea came from someone "lower down in the organization" who was concerned, like he is, about incorrect information going out over...
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Clifton Johnson wipes down his used Lexus once a day with a carefully folded white towel. A mango-scented air freshener hangs from the rearview mirror. The car's polished wood paneling gleams from the rays shining through the sun roof. The car has more than 119,000 miles on it, but Johnson treats it like it's brand-new. Both are on their second lives. At 45, Johnson is trying for a fresh start after spending most of his life dealing drugs, in jail or imprisoned. During his days as a drug dealer and supplier, Johnson owned a white Lexus and a green Pathfinder that were confiscated or repossessed.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Really Raw Honey is known for its straight-from-the-hive product, a creamy white treat sold online and in hundreds of stores like Whole Foods. But the buzz about the Highlandtown-based company this week involved handguns, rifles, ammunition and cocaine Baltimore police say were seized in raids on the firm's warehouse and its owner's North Baltimore home. Owner Frantz Walker was charged with armed drug trafficking and held at Central Booking on $1 million bail until he posted bond Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
Growing up in Park Heights during the crack-ridden 1990s, Brandon Scott used to wash cars at his uncle's shop, where some of the customers were drug dealers — and unlikely sources of advice for the high school track star who would grow up to become a city councilman. "I had one guy tell me as I was going off to St. Mary's [College], 'If I had a chance to do it again, I would have taken that football scholarship. Forget about this money,'" he remembers. The following year, the man was shot dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Baltimore author Sheri Booker sees dead people. In her mind's eye, she can clearly remember the 600-pound man whose corpse had to be hoisted by a crane out of his apartment window, the teenage suicide victim who tattooed instructions about his funeral arrangements onto his arm, and the thug whose death incited a brawl that erupted at his viewing and continued into the street. Booker, who now is 31, began working at the Wylie Funeral Home in West Baltimore in 1997 at age 15, partly as a way of coping with her grief over the death of a beloved aunt.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
A Baltimore police officer accepted cash payments and provided protection for a man she believed to be a drug dealer — a man who was actually working with department investigators and FBI agents to build a criminal case against her, authorities alleged Friday. Ashley Roane, a 25-year-old patrol officer in the Southwestern District, agreed to access law enforcement databases listing informants and other sensitive information for the drug dealer, and provided Social Security numbers to him as part of a scheme to obtain false tax refunds, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
A former Baltimore Police officer pleaded guilty Thursday to improperly accessing a law enforcement database to provide information to a drug dealer who was under federal investigation. Keith Nowlin, 39, of Laurel, pleaded guilty to one count of accessing a protected computer without authorization. In June 18, 2010, prosecutors say Nowlin, then an officer assigned to the Northeastern District, exchanged text messages with a man named Marvin Mobley, who was being monitored through a wiretap as part of a drug trafficking investigation.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
When Brenda Brown stood before a judge, she figured she had only one real option: plead guilty. She had been caught with three bags of marijuana in her pocket in Northwest Baltimore. She didn't know that Kendell Richburg, the arresting officer, had lied about having seen her buy the drugs, potentially violating her constitutional right against unreasonable search and seizure. Now, her case is among hundreds under review by prosecutors in light of Richburg's conduct. Brown, 52, is serving a sentence that includes a year of probation, court costs, counseling, drug testing and another possession count on a lengthy rap sheet.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A Baltimore contract killer, who was caught telling an undercover FBI agent that he would murder someone for drugs and cash, pleaded guilty Thursday and was sentenced to more than 19 years in federal prison, the U.S. Attorney's office announced.  "There are other hit men like Antonio McKiver who commit drug-related murders in Baltimore," U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein said in a news release. "Our challenge is to catch them before the next murder so we don't need to chase them afterwards.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
A Baltimore judge sentenced Jason K. Hamel to 50 years in prison for the Federal Hill murder of an alleged drug dealer who tricked him into paying $5,000 for a T-shirt he said was a package of cocaine. The shooting happened in 800 block of Battery Avenue on June 20, 2008 when Hamel, 33, went to meet his victim Keyva Bluitt and two other men to do the supposed drug deal. Hamel picked up the package at around 9:15 p.m. and soon realized the deception, according to the Baltimore state's attorney's office.
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