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Drug Dealer

FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 26, 2004
SUN SCORE * America's #1 Best Selling Black Author" proclaims the cover of late pulp writer Donald Goines' 1974 novel Never Die Alone. It's a depressing proclamation no matter how many French cultists prop it up with lavish blurbs like "flashing talent straight from the streets of the lost" (L'Express) or "His stories almost have an ethnographic value" (La Liberte de l'Est). Underline the "almost." Goines, a gangster author who's now a hero to gangsta rappers, wrote two novels behind bars and 16 in the four years between his release in 1970 and his murder in 1974.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2005
On one end of the cell phone line was a veteran of the Baltimore Police Department looking for a way to restore his reputation inside an agency that had fired him. On the other end was a drug kingpin who ran a $50 million marijuana ring and ordered the murders of at least three people. In between, federal investigators were secretly listening for evidence of a crime. Based on those wiretaps, Sgt. Jeremiah Kelly now stands accused of participating in one of the city's largest drug conspiracies.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2001
A 52-year-old Israeli national who was considered a major drug dealer before he fled from federal authorities in the 1980s to carve out a new life as a coffee merchant in Brazil pleaded guilty yesterday to a felony drug charge in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Reuven Tenamee, sought for the past decade as the leader of a ring that imported cocaine from Miami and New York, pleaded guilty before Judge J. Frederick Motz to one count of distribution of cocaine. He was apprehended in November by authorities checking his passport at the airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands, where he had flown on business, his lawyer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Appearing as Malik "Poot" Carr for five seasons on "The Wire," Tray Chaney enjoyed one of the longest lives any drug dealer has ever had in prime time. "I was so lucky in my very first acting role," says Chaney, now living in La Plata, Charles County. "You can't be any more blessed than that starting out. " He's intent on sharing some of that blessed feeling. The father of two runs a production company and has a new film coming out in December. He's promoting HIV testing for the Prince George's County Health Department and making appearances and a music video for United Way of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,Special to The Evening Sun | November 6, 1991
About a half hour into "Wicked Ways" at the Lyric Opera House last night it was "deja vu all over again," as Yogi Bera said.It has all been shown before: the evil drug dealer, the prodigal children, the God-fearing parents who pray that their children will stop running with the wrong crowd, return to school or church and make something of their lives.While the story line may be getting a little worn around the edges, "Wicked Ways" is probably the strongest in the string of nationally touring urban contemporary musicals that have played the Lyric in the past couple of years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In one of the largest police corruption cases in Washington's history, a dozen officers have been indicted on charges that they took bribes to protect federal undercover agents who they thought were drug dealers and to help transport cocaine.The indictment was returned by a federal grand jury Tuesday, when the defendants were taken into custody. All 12 pleaded not guilty yesterday and were taken from the courtroom to a local jail, where they will be held pending hearings on whether they should be granted bail.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | November 21, 1990
A Baltimore police officer who paid a drug dealer for a gram of cocaine with a personal check was fired from the force yesterday, the police said.Officer Carl V. Smith, 35, who had been assigned to the Youth Section in the department's Community Service Division, was ordered off the force by Police Commissioner Edward V. Woods.A departmental trial board had found Officer Smith guilty Nov. 12 of purchasing cocaine from a known drug dealer on 10 occasions while under surveillance by the department's Internal Investigation Division.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn SUN STAFF | October 2, 1997
The hand-held vacuum looks like a Dust Buster, but it collects more than just lint. Call it the drug buster.With this new drug-detection system, called the Ionscan 400, the state is searching for the most minute traces of illegal narcotics on people who visit or work at Maryland's prisons. Officials say it's more accurate than a drug-sniffing dog -- and never gets tired or needs food or exercise."The message we're sending is if you're a bad person and trying to get drugs into our prisons, we're going to catch you," said William W. Sondervan, an assistant commissioner for the state Division of Correction, during a demonstration this week at the Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 22, 1991
So what do we do with the 10-year-old with the gun?I mean, besides putting his photograph on the front page of the newspaper. What do we do after that? What happens to him?And while we're on the subject, does anyone know what became of the 8-year-old who was holding dope for a drug dealer on Booth Street in West Baltimore three years ago? Is he still among the junkies? Does he still live on a street safe for no one but the young, hard-bitten drug dealers who give strangers the evil eye? Whatever happened to that kid?
NEWS
March 8, 2008
An 18-year-old man has pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in the shooting of a man who was using a toy gun to rob a drug dealer. He was sentenced to eight years in prison, the Baltimore state's attorney's office said. On Aug. 9, prosecutors said, Omar McGee learned that Troy Richardson, 30, of Dundalk was robbing a drug dealer in an alley off the 3400 block of Dupont Ave., near where McGee lived in Northwest Baltimore. McGee shot Richardson twice in the leg and once in the face, prosecutors said.
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